Greek Syntax: Lexham SGNT Running Text

Awhile back, I posted about the Lexham Syntactic Greek New Testament (Lexham SGNT). At that time, I mentioned I’d blog about the makeup of that project.

It’s been nearly two weeks since that post. But now it is time to make good and describe the pieces of the Lexham SGNT in a little more detail.

The Lexham SGNT consists of three primary resources. These are:
  • The Lexham Syntactic Greek New Testament
  • The Lexham Syntactic Greek New Testament: Sentence Analysis
  • The Lexham Syntactic Greek New Testament: Expansions and Annotations
This post details the first item in the above list, the Lexham Syntactic Greek New Testament (aka the “running text” of the Lexham SGNT).

Of the Making of Books (Part 2)

Today’s guest blogger is Ken Smith, General Manager of Electronic Publishing Services at Logos.
(This is the second in a series of articles about our nearly 60 publishing partners who market their own electronic products using our technology.)

InterVarsity Press (US) and Inter-Varsity Press (UK)
IVP is an example of a “hybrid” partnership, where we have licensed certain titles from them (e.g., The IVP New Testament Commentary Series) and they have marketed others in their own product collections. As always, our primary goal is to make more quality books available to our users, regardless of how they are distributed.

After a few years of licensing books from both the US and UK branches of IVP, we were thrilled when they co-published their Essential IVP Reference Collection in December of 2000.

For the first time, best-selling and highly respected titles like The Dictionary of Jesus and the Gospels, The Dictionary of Paul and His Letters and The New Bible Atlas were made available in electronic format and compatible with all of our existing electronic books. All told, 13 of IVP’s best biblical dictionaries and commentaries are included in this tremendously valuable product.

In September of 2005, IVP released another significant electronic product: The Ancient Christian Commentary on Scripture (Volume I).

The first ACCS electronic collection includes twelve volumes from this monumental work in progress. Here’s a little trivia for you: What is the connection between ACCS and the Logos edition of the Early Church Fathers? If you guessed Tom Oden, the General Editor of ACCS, you know your Logos history! It was a partnership with Tom and Drew University that made possible the initial digitization of that 38-volume, nearly 19,000 page work.

Previous: Thomas Nelson | Next: Fortress Press

Mindset for Missions

John Fallahee, who works in our ministry and academic relations department, returned last week from 12 days spent visiting the country of Albania. This is his mini-report from the trip…

In a unique partnership with Logos Bible Software, The Master’s Academy International and Southeastern Europe Theological Seminary we were able to train up the next generation of pastors with Logos Bible Software.

With generous donations from the local church, various individuals, institutions, and non-profit foundations each student was equipped with his own laptop, Scholar’s Library, and key Logos compatible books like Theological Journals, HALOT, and BDAG.

These Albanian pastors were trained in theological research as well as equipped to teach and preach, with the assistance of Logos Bible Software. What made this event significant is these men have “leap-frogged” over their peers in the number of resources available to them to study as well as the equipping and training they have received to work with the original languages. In the words of one of the students at the end of training, “I am overwhelmed with the generosity of believers from America, and see now how this tool will save me time and help me preach God’s Word better to my fellow Albanians.”


Note: We have been cleared to use these photos on the site.

On the air in the early morning

Scott LindseyIt was pretty dark in Bellingham, WA at 5:30 AM yesterday, but the lights were on here at Logos Bible Software. Scott Lindsey, ministry relations manager, was on the air with American Family Radio stations, being interviewed from his desk. (This is the problem with being on the west coast.)

Our receptionist and three salespeople dragged themselves out of bed to be in the office in case we got some calls. The phone lit up after Scott said “Imagine a truck pulling up in front of your home on Christmas morning with a complete Bible college library, and a research assistant for your own personal use.”

We are glad that so many people see the benefits of a large Bible reference library, and apologize to those of you who had to wait on the phones yesterday morning.

Heirloom Books

While going through digital images of books we’ve had scanned at Dallas Theological Seminary library, I recently came across this flyleaf in a commentary by John Owen.

Lewis Sperry Chafer (1871-1952; bio) was the founding president of Dallas Theological Seminary, and he wrote a systematic theology that we just shipped on Monday.

His father, Thomas Franklin Chafer, died when Lewis was just 11 years old. As you can see, the Owen commentary belonged first to the personal library of the father, was passed to the son, and from there to the seminary.

I’ve heard it said (by detractors of the digital library paradigm) that you never hear of anyone bequeathing digital books to their children. But I just checked with our manager of customer support, John Brandt, who told me it has happened a few times during his 6 years with the company. All we need is a letter from the executor of the estate and we can transfer the licenses to the inheritor.

(Note to self: update will to include name of daughter born almost 2 years ago AND specify beneficiary of digital library.)

I find it interesting that used print booksellers, who often acquire entire personal libraries from an estate or a retiring scholar, will sometimes keep that personal library intact. Dove Booksellers does this and lists the books as collections on their website. It’s fascinating to look through the books that belonged to a notable scholar and see what they found worthy of owning. [Caution: this practice can produce severe book envy.]

But it’s only a matter of time until the same thing happens with Logos Bible Software users who have amassed a personal library numbering in the thousands. Maybe someday you’ll find yourself looking through a list of 1,500 electronic books owned by a notable scholar in a field you’re interested in and we’ll offer you a way to buy them all in one fell swoop as a custom collection.
It could happen…

Syntax: Thinking About Clause Boundaries

When approaching a text, one of the initial steps of exegesis is to do some general background study, thus becoming familiar with the larger context of a passage. If I’m looking at a passage in First John, I should have a decent idea of the author, recipient and setting of the letter. Logos has several resources (commentaries, handbooks, dictionaries, encyclopedias, etc.) that should provide assistance with this general process.

After this initial step, according to many guides to NT exegesis (e.g. Fee’s NT Exegesis) the next step is to work through the the grammar and syntax of the passage. Some guides mention that one should read (and re-read, and re-read) the passage. One must be familiar with the current context and the larger context for exegesis to be effective.

When you’re familiar with the text through the reading (and re-reading) of it, you’ve arrived at the point where detailed picking apart of the text is required. This is the point where one really begins to consider issues of grammar and syntax of the original language.

There are existing resources to consult to learn these things; some are even available in Logos Bible Software. These should be consulted and applied. But detailed reading of a book that provides hints, clues and process for exegesis does not magically transform the reader into a competent and confident exegete of Scripture. This only happens through practice and repetition.

And this is why morphologically and syntactically annotated editions of the primary texts of the Hebrew Bible and the Greek New Testament are necessary. They provide an example for you to check your work against, to use in the sharpening of your own skills. This is very helpful when you don’t have a hard-grading seminary prof check your work for accuracy.

This article walks through some ways to think about clause boundaries using Logos Bible Software; comparing these to the information provided by the Lexham Syntactic Greek New Testament.

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Of the Making of Books

Today’s guest blogger is Ken Smith, General Manager of Electronic Publishing Services at Logos.
While there are hundreds of wonderful electronic books included with our “Library” products or available for individual purchase on our web site, there is also a gold mine of additional books that may not be as well-known to many of our customers.

For nearly ten years, we have been partnering with publishers to produce products for them to market using our technology. Here is one of the first products of that type, released by Baker in February of 1996:

I have had the distinct pleasure of overseeing the production of over 175 products from about 60 different publishers in the past ten years. Today’s blog entry is the first installment in a series of articles that will introduce a number of those publishers and products.

Thomas Nelson Publishers
One of our first and most prolific partners is Thomas Nelson. In June of 1997, they released a collection of more than 70 of their best reference books titled Nelson’s Electronic Bible Reference Library (NEBRL).

The Nelson Reference & Electronic imprint has gone on to publish nearly 500 titles using our technology. In March of 2002, the NEBRL product was reconfigured, updated to use the new Libronix Digital Library System and rebranded as eBible™. Their other products range from collections of best-selling books by Max Lucado, John MacArthur, Charles Stanley, Jack Hayford, J. Vernon McGee, David Jeremiah and John Maxwell to the highly-respected Word Biblical Commentary series.

Most of Nelson’s products are available for sale on our web site, either in collections or individually. In fact, we recently added a “mega-collection” of 325 Nelson titles at a huge savings over the individual purchase price.

Max LucadoJohn MacArthurDavid JeremiahWord Biblical CommentaryNelson 325 Book Unlock

Partnering with Nelson has been a very beneficial relationship for both companies. Using our technology allows Nelson to carry a full range of the highest-quality electronic products with zero investment in programming. Adding Nelson’s outstanding reference and trade titles to the Logos “family” has heightened our profile among religious publishers and given our customers a much greater selection of quality books to integrate with their existing Logos products.
Next: InterVarsity Press

It’s Beginning to Look a Lot Like Christmas

The Logos elves were hard at work decorating the place last week. I caught a couple of them (Jacquie and Tracy) in the act…

Click a thumbnail image to see a larger version.

Greek Syntax: Introducing the Lexham Syntactic Greek New Testament

I’ve posted in the past regarding a project we’ve been working on with the good folks at OpenText.org; to make their syntactic analysis of the entire Greek New Testament available in Logos Bible Software. It is a massive project, and it will provide oodles of chunky syntactic goodness to Logos Bible Software users to inform and sharpen their studies of the New Testament.

But that isn’t all that we’ve got cookin’ on the Greek Syntax front. We’ve been working on our own syntactic analysis of the Greek New Testament. We’re calling it the Lexham Syntactic Greek New Testament; this post (including a video link, see below!) introduces the work and begins to discuss it in some more detail.

I should say that this project involves a lot of work, and that it will be released in stages as the work progresses. We waited until we had the first major chunk — the General (or Catholic) Epistles, Hebrews through Jude — to consider a release. The first release (as happenstance would have it, perfectly timed with Logos Bible Software 3.0! What serendipity!) will therefore include these books. We hope to release an update in the spring that will include data for the book of Revelation. After that, the Pauline Epistles will trickle out over the following year or so; other books after that. At least, that’s the plan for now.

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Syntax: Now in the 3.0 Beta!

The Andersen-Forbes syntax data is now available as part of the Libronix DLS 3.0 beta. The syntax stuff is 200+ megabytes of data, so we’ve split it out into a separate beta download.

Once you’ve installed all of that, you may want to know what to do with all of this syntax information. I’ve written a short LDLS Syntax Crash Course which is available in PDF format here. You may also want to re-read some or all of the articles in the syntax category on this blog. Or you may want to re-read my ETS paper on the subject.

We are interested in your feedback and your questions. You can leave them as questions in the comments section of the blog, or you can do it on the beta newsgroup forum at news.logos.com.