So do I call it Logos or Libronix or what?

I apologize. I know it is confusing, and I am sorry.

Libronix is a brand name owned by Logos. The Libronix Digital Library System is what we call our software platform. Logos Bible Software is what we call the products that contain both the Libronix DLS and a collection of electronic books, because without the books there is nothing Bible-specific about the Libronix DLS.

Other companies use the Libronix DLS, too, under license from us, and they give their products (consisting of the Libronix DLS and their electronic books) different names, like eBible or The Essential IVP Reference Collection.

We created the Libronix brand many years ago with the idea of separating our technology from our content-based products in order to make it easier for other companies to license and use our technology in their own products. We did not use the word “Logos” in the technology brand in order to avoid confusion between ours and other Bible software packages; we also had secular publishers licensing the technology, and the word “Logos” did not mean anything in that context.

Back then we also imagined that we might split the company into two organizations, one focused on technology and one on Bible software content. We created the Libronix Corporation as a wholly-owned subsidiary of Logos in anticipation of that split. Our strategy has changed, though, and we are now completely focused on serving the Bible software market and our publishing partners in Bible-related publishing. Libronix Corporation still exists, but as no more than a file folder of paperwork and a separate phone number that rings at the Logos reception desk.

What do we call our product? Logos Bible Software. This is the product you can buy, in specifically named collections: Logos Bible Software Pastor’s Library, Logos Bible Software Scholar’s Library, etc.

What do we call our software platform? The Libronix DLS. This is the technology platform shared by many publishers, including Logos Bible Software. When you are installing or activating or upgrading the software itself you are working with the Libronix DLS, and all of those actions affect all the Libronix DLS based books you have installed, regardless of which product they came in.

And finally, Libronix is a word that we made up. That made it easier for trademark and domain name purposes. We pronounce it like “library” and “electronics”.

Greek Syntax: Lexham SGNT Expansions and Annotations

Last week, I posted on the Lexham SGNT “running text”. I mentioned at that time that there are three primary pieces of the Lexham Syntactic Greek New Testament:

  • The Lexham Syntactic Greek New Testament
  • The Lexham Syntactic Greek New Testament: Sentence Analysis
  • The Lexham Syntactic Greek New Testament: Expansions and Annotations

Today it is time to look at the Expansions and Annotations resource. This resource is still in a state of flux, so the implementation may change somewhat between now and the time that the Lexham SGNT is released.

Continue Reading…

ICC: A big job but somebody had to do it

Nearly two years after the initial prepublication announcement, the complete International Critical Commentary Series (ICC) is finished… The commentary series that took more than 100 years to write (and counting) has been digitized in just over 2.

As you can see, this is one big set of books. Fifty-three bound volumes to be exact. When we posted the prepub page on December 12, 2003, we had no idea how many people would pony up $1,000 for the set. But we knew the value of the series for biblical study and knew that of any electronic publisher we were in the best position to get it done.

The books were shipped off to the data keying center and came back needing lots of correction. In particular, the ancient language text (like Hebrew, Aramaic, Syriac, Coptic and Greek) required a team of developers to go through it word by word, correcting the files as they went. This turned out to be such a headache that we devised a new tool (dubbed Shibboleth and mentioned briefly by Bob on his own blog) to speed up the process.

The specifics about the ways Shibboleth speeds up and improves the process is fodder for another post, probably by someone who knows more about it than I do. But I can say that “there was much rejoicing” in the text development department the day the final volume was completed, ship-checked and ready to head off to replication.

And now, just over two years after announcing the start of this massive project, it is being delivered to users so that these important volumes can be utilized by seminary professors and students, preachers, teachers and other folks studying the Bible.

Of the Making of Books (Part 3)

Today’s guest blogger is Ken Smith, General Manager of Electronic Publishing Services at Logos.

(This is the third in a series of articles about our nearly 60 publishing partners who market their own electronic products using our technology.)

Fortress Press

With some publishers, we start small and work our way up to bigger projects. With Fortress Press, it’s been quite the opposite. The first project we did with them in October, 2001 was the voluminous Luther’s Works on CD-ROM, co-published with Concordia Publishing House.

This massive, 55-volume work is one of the most ambitious projects we have ever embarked upon. Luther’s Works is one of those products, however, where the simplicity and compactness of the electronic medium vastly understates the significance, complexity and value of the work. For the price of a handful of print volumes, thousands of pages from one of Christianity’s most prolific and influential writers are yours in a format that is portable, easily accessible, and exceptionally useful.

At the opposite end of the spectrum, Fortress Press has since released a series of single or dual book/CD combination products that have proven very successful in the academic market.

Beginning with their Christian Theology Set, they now have 17 different titles in this category, including Hanson and Oakman’s Palestine in the Time of Jesus, Walter Brueggemann’s Theology of the Old Testament and most recently, Jewish Literature between the Bible and the Mishnah by George Nickelsburg.

We’ve recently made all of these titles available for sale on our web site, both individually and in an all-in-one collection. We like to think of them as free paperback books with purchase of your Libronix-compatible electronic editions!

Next: Galaxie Software

Looks Pretty Festive Around Here

Each year here at Logos, we have an inter-departmental Christmas decorating contest. The rules are pretty simple: Each department decorates its area, judges come around at the appointed time, and a winner is declared.

For the past few years in a row, the Logos Accounting department has won both the decorating contest and the bragging rights. It’s not hard to see why: The “Accounting Angels,” as they call themselves, are a group of ladies who are serious about their Christmas Spirit. In short, the Accounting department has been something of a juggernaut in this contest.

Continue Reading…

Merry Christmas!

Now that you are done with all your Christmas shopping (you are done, aren’t you?) you may want to take a look at some books for your own library. We just added a number of titles to both Community Pricing and the Pre-Pub programs.

It is a great blessing to have a job like ours, providing tools to help people study the Word. We are thankful for this privilege and for all of you, our customers, partners, and friends, who put those tools to use in study, teaching, and preaching. Thank you for your support and encouragement and prayers.

Merry Christmas!

Syntax: VSO, VOS, SVO, SOV, OVS, OSV

No, I didn’t just randomly press the V, S, and O keys. What these letters represent are the six possible arrangements of subject (S), object (O), and verb (V) within a clause. Several people have asked me, “How would I search for SVO versus VSO clauses in the Andersen-Forbes (A-F) database?” It’s pretty easy, actually.

Continue Reading…

Greek Syntax: Lexham SGNT Running Text

Awhile back, I posted about the Lexham Syntactic Greek New Testament (Lexham SGNT). At that time, I mentioned I’d blog about the makeup of that project.

It’s been nearly two weeks since that post. But now it is time to make good and describe the pieces of the Lexham SGNT in a little more detail.

The Lexham SGNT consists of three primary resources. These are:
  • The Lexham Syntactic Greek New Testament
  • The Lexham Syntactic Greek New Testament: Sentence Analysis
  • The Lexham Syntactic Greek New Testament: Expansions and Annotations
This post details the first item in the above list, the Lexham Syntactic Greek New Testament (aka the “running text” of the Lexham SGNT).

Of the Making of Books (Part 2)

Today’s guest blogger is Ken Smith, General Manager of Electronic Publishing Services at Logos.
(This is the second in a series of articles about our nearly 60 publishing partners who market their own electronic products using our technology.)

InterVarsity Press (US) and Inter-Varsity Press (UK)
IVP is an example of a “hybrid” partnership, where we have licensed certain titles from them (e.g., The IVP New Testament Commentary Series) and they have marketed others in their own product collections. As always, our primary goal is to make more quality books available to our users, regardless of how they are distributed.

After a few years of licensing books from both the US and UK branches of IVP, we were thrilled when they co-published their Essential IVP Reference Collection in December of 2000.

For the first time, best-selling and highly respected titles like The Dictionary of Jesus and the Gospels, The Dictionary of Paul and His Letters and The New Bible Atlas were made available in electronic format and compatible with all of our existing electronic books. All told, 13 of IVP’s best biblical dictionaries and commentaries are included in this tremendously valuable product.

In September of 2005, IVP released another significant electronic product: The Ancient Christian Commentary on Scripture (Volume I).

The first ACCS electronic collection includes twelve volumes from this monumental work in progress. Here’s a little trivia for you: What is the connection between ACCS and the Logos edition of the Early Church Fathers? If you guessed Tom Oden, the General Editor of ACCS, you know your Logos history! It was a partnership with Tom and Drew University that made possible the initial digitization of that 38-volume, nearly 19,000 page work.

Previous: Thomas Nelson | Next: Fortress Press

Mindset for Missions

John Fallahee, who works in our ministry and academic relations department, returned last week from 12 days spent visiting the country of Albania. This is his mini-report from the trip…

In a unique partnership with Logos Bible Software, The Master’s Academy International and Southeastern Europe Theological Seminary we were able to train up the next generation of pastors with Logos Bible Software.

With generous donations from the local church, various individuals, institutions, and non-profit foundations each student was equipped with his own laptop, Scholar’s Library, and key Logos compatible books like Theological Journals, HALOT, and BDAG.

These Albanian pastors were trained in theological research as well as equipped to teach and preach, with the assistance of Logos Bible Software. What made this event significant is these men have “leap-frogged” over their peers in the number of resources available to them to study as well as the equipping and training they have received to work with the original languages. In the words of one of the students at the end of training, “I am overwhelmed with the generosity of believers from America, and see now how this tool will save me time and help me preach God’s Word better to my fellow Albanians.”


Note: We have been cleared to use these photos on the site.