National Bible Week Essay Contest

In honor of National Bible Week, which is this week, we’re sponsoring an essay contest on Logos.com.

You are invited to write and submit a brief essay on Bible study. If we display the essay on the site, you’ll receive a $30 book unlock credit. The sign-up form is here.

We’ve posted 30 essays to date, with a nice variety of themes and perspectives represented. The essays give a flavor of all the different kinds of ministry going on among Logos users. I find this to be a real encouragement amidst the day to day grind; I’ll highlight below a couple of my favorite selections (you can read them all in their entirety on the Essays page)…

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Novel Use of Sentence Diagrammer

So, the other day, I had printed out a sentence diagram of Mark 1.16-20 and was evaluating it while making coffee (triple americano, no milk or sugar messing it up) at the Logos espresso machine.

Heidie from accounting walks by. “What’s that?” she says. I reply, “Sentence diagrams.” “Oh” Heidie says, “it looks sort of like playoff brackets.”

I hadn’t ever thought of that. But you could use the sentence diagrammer to make playoff brackets for whatever. I hear the NFL season ends in a month or so; now you’ll be ready to chart your team’s path to the Super Bowl!

(If you have the Sentence Diagramming Addin you can download the file for editing! Just unzip it to “\My Documents\Libronix DLS\SentenceDiagrams”.)

Overflow Crowd

Yesterday at the annual meeting of the Evangelical Theological Society, Logos bloggers and Information Architects Rick Brannan and Eli Evans presented our new syntactic databases. (Their presentation was part of a larger session which also included a presentation on how Logos Bible Software is used in the classroom at Moody Graduate School.)

This photo was taken while Eli presented the Andersen-Forbes syntactic database. We were flattered by all the interest and only wish the session had been in a larger room.

If you are with us here in Philadelphia, be sure to check out other Logos-related sessions at AAR/SBL.

Logos for the Mac: New Ship Date & Screenshots

Yesterday we announced a new release date for Logos Bible Software for the Mac: Spring 2006. We’re confident that the product will be shipping by the time June 21 rolls around, and we know it will be worth the wait.

Work is progressing steadily with no major obstacles, and the application looks great in the current build. Our artist-in-residence (who is a Mac devotee himself) turned out some very nice visuals for the interface so that Logos Bible Software would feel right at home on the Mac.

We get a lot of questions about how to participate in beta testing the Mac product. We’ll announce all public beta testing from the Logos for the Mac email list so sign up and stay tuned…

Disclaimer: Screenshots are from the prototype; the interface is subject to small or massive changes before we ship.

Syntax: Andersen-Forbes Introduction

I was recently dispatched to Melbourne to visit Frank Andersen and Dean Forbes. One of the things I was assigned to discover — other than what kangaroo chili tastes like* — was the underlying linguistic/textual/grammatical philosophy of the Andersen-Forbes database (hereafter, A-F). Sure, they’ve marked the entire Hebrew Bible for syntax, but what exactly does that mean?

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Product Guides on Logos.com

Thanks to one of our resident book experts (and book developer), Vincent Setterholm, we have launched a series of product guides on the Logos.com website. So far, these guides provide a basic introduction to the categories and sub-categories of books available for Logos Bible Software in the areas of Greek, Hebrew, and Other Ancient Languages. We hope to add additional categories soon.

I think Vincent does a great job of guiding the site visitor through the plethora of Logos tools and texts available for biblical language study.
For example, did you know that we now offer 9 Greek grammars and 8 Hebrew grammars that range from beginning to advanced, learning to reference? Or that we have a growing number of tools for studying Aramaic and Syriac?

These guides help fill a need I mentioned in an earlier post here on the Logos Blog: a need for “…objectively-written guides to books on Logos.com to help our users navigate the 5,000 titles now available for the system, much like a bookstore owner who offers suggestions based not on his own likes and dislikes but based on his extensive knowledge of what’s available.”
Thanks for leading us around a few aisles of the bookstore, Vincent!

Greek Syntax: Clauses in OpenText.org Material

It’s been awhile since I’ve posted about Greek syntax. In the interim, Eli has been regaling us with graph theory and all sorts of other chunky syntactical goodness.
Well, the drought is over.

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Biblical Counseling Library

The “Logos Pre-Pub Machine” has been in high gear for some time now…this week alone we shipped two significant, heavyweight products for biblical language study—Comfort & Barrett’s The Text of the Earliest New Testament Greek Manuscripts and The Targums—while in the past 10 days we’ve posted three new prepubs to take their place.

One of these new prepubs breaks new ground for us, and that is the Biblical Counseling Library, posted to the prepub page just yesterday.
What’s novel about it is this: it’s a thematic collection bringing together 29 books from 20 authors and 10 publishers…all on subjects related to biblical counseling. We’ve done lots of author collections, publisher collections, and so on…but not really a large, thematic collection like this.

Some of the titles included are breakout bestsellers (e.g., I Kissed Dating Goodbye and Finishing Strong) while others are evergreen category standards (e.g., Competent to Counsel and Inside Out). Authors include Jay E. Adams, Larry Crabb, Elizabeth George, Steve Farrar, Steve Gallagher, Jerry Bridges and Francis Schaeffer. Publishers represented include Tyndale, Navpress, Zondervan, Multnomah, and Harvest House.

This collection is discounted 61% off the list prices of the 29 books included. Any pastor or layperson who counsels others—whether professionally or in an informal way—would do well to add them to their digital library.
You heard about it here first…the NewsWire email hasn’t yet been sent. More tools for ministry…let the Pre-Pub Machine roll on!

Syntax: Why Graphs? Part II

http://blog.logos.com/archives/2005/11/syntax_andersen.html Consider the simple graph to the right. A graph, you will recall, is a diagram made up of labels and lines. This particular graph has some further special characteristics: (1) This is a directed graph, because the lines are arrows that indicate which labels are “on top,” so to speak; if this were a corporate organization chart, the arrows would always point from manager to employee. (2) This graph is acyclic, which is a fancy word meaning “no cycles,” which is a fancy way of saying that if you follow the arrows in the direction they are pointing, you will never visit the same label twice. Put another way, if no matter where you start, you will eventually reach the end. (3) This particular graph is a tree, because it has exactly one topmost label (the CEO in our org chart), and each label has one and only one arrow that points to it. That is, each employee has only one boss — wouldn’t that be nice?

I think that I shall never seea graph as lovely as a tree.

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Syntax: Why Graphs?

Why did we choose graphs to represent syntax instead of something else? Short answer: Because.
The long answer, however, is much more interesting: Because every method of graphically showing the syntactic form of a sentence or clause has its pros and cons. Graphs have a lot of pros, and not many cons.

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