Syntax Search Example: Articular Participle in Clause Complement (Object)

I was talking with Daniel Foster yesterday afternoon. We were talking about syntax search examples and how they’re different than other sorts of morphological searches.
One type of search that we used to rely on the Graphical Query Editor to do (and still do; we didn’t take this capability away) was to do what is generally known as “agreement searching”.
An example would be: Find where two words exist N words apart (where, say, N = 5) and the two words agree on some sort of morphological criteria (like, say, case, number or gender).
This sort of approach is commonly used to find where a noun or participle has an article, or where an adjective is associated with a noun. Things like that. In essence, we approximate an established syntactic relationship using proximity (within N words) and morphological criteria (sharing same case, number and gender).
What we really want, though, is where an article modifies a participle or noun. That is, where the article and participle have an established relationship. The number of words that separate them is incidental, they could be next to each other or they could be 15 words apart. We’re interested in the specific relationship.
The good news is: This search can be done in the New Testament with an underlying syntactic database. Since we’ll be searching the entire New Testament, we’ll use the OpenText.org Syntactically Analyzed Greek New Testament, which has been discussed previously on this blog.
The better news is: We can do even more — like, say, find where participles have an article that modifies, and where the “articular participle” is (for example) in the Complement (object) of a clause. Like what the below syntax search specifies.

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Highlighting English Based on Greek Morphology

It’s cool to see features and datasets combine in ways that weren’t originally anticipated.
Just the other day, Eli and I were talking with Dale Pritchett (VP Marketing and Bob’s father!) and Dale wondered about how to highlight an English text based on Greek or Hebrew morphology. Sort of like this:

Eli and I looked at each other quizzically. Then at about the same time we had the answer: Reverse Interlinear! And the cool part is that the feature already works in Logos Bible Software 3! It is a consequence of having data and functionality already in place, we just hadn’t quite stopped to realize the extent of the functionality. But it is a consequence of:

  • Having Reverse Interlinears available that align the original language texts (Greek and Hebrew) with a modern language translation at the word level.
  • Having morphological information in the original language texts underlying the English translation of the Reverse Interlinear.
  • Having a Visual Filter (a method of overlaying highlighting based on specified criteria) for morphologies.

Because of the architecture of Logos Bible Software … well, it just works. Nothing extra needed.
Here’s a short video (Flash, approx. 0.7 MB, no sound) that walks through how to specify the visual filter for the reverse interlinear. It walks through setting up a visual filter that highlights where finite verbs (i.e., verbs in the indicative, imperative, subjunctive or optative moods) occur in the Aorist tense. These will be visually highlighted with the “Box” style, so you can simply see them as you scroll through the text. And you’ll see how the ESV handles translating them. After the visual filter is set, I then show how interlinear lines are customizable. In the end, you see only the English text of the ESV, but the English words that represent the aorist verbs are highlighted … and no Greek is in sight.


Video: Flash, approx. 0.7 MB, no sound

Pretty cool. Give it a try if you’re running the Release Candidate!

Searching Libraries Remotely

I’m excited about a lot of the features in the upcoming Logos Bible Software 3. One of them that hasn’t received much air time is the Remote Library Search.

Huh?

That’s right. Remote Library Search.

Let’s face it, there are a decent amount of folks out there that are book geeks, just like me. We’re the type of people who:

  • Actually read footnote references.
  • Hate books that use endnotes instead of footnotes because you have to constantly refer to the back of the book.
  • Actually look up citations in footnotes and endnotes.
  • Feel like you need to obtain cited books if they sound interesting or appropriate based on the footnote.

Remote Library Search is for you.

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Meet the Staff: Kimi Sebens

I visited the shipping department on a slow day, so Kimi was able to show me around a little. As you might imagine, the shipping department puts product together and gets all the orders out to our customers worldwide.

Windows Media (1.9MB) | Quicktime (2.5MB)

Of the Making of Books (Part 9)

Today’s guest blogger is Ken Smith, General Manager of Electronic Publishing Services at Logos.
(This is the next installment in a series of articles about our nearly 60 publishing partners who market their own electronic products using our technology.)

AMG Publishers

You might recall that in Part 2 of this series, we described a “hybrid” partnership with InterVarsity Press (US and UK), where we license some titles and also create publisher-marketed products. Another successful partnership in this category is with AMG Publishers. If you don’t know the AMG name, you might recognize the name of their president—Spiros Zodhiates.

AMG’s first product, Bible Essentials, was released in April 2001 and updated to the Libronix Digital Library System in September 2004. This outstanding collection includes the well-known Complete Word Study Dictionary and Complete Word Study Bible (KJV), along with a dozen or so key reference titles.

We currently license several individual titles from AMG and also have two exciting collections in our pre-publication program: The Following God Workbook Series and Learning the Basics of New Testament Greek.

Next: Baker Publishing Group

Cool Post from a Logos User

A Logos user living in Siberia recently posted his solution to an interesting problem: how to locate discussions of a doctrinal concept (“Preservation of Scripture”) in his electronic library when that concept goes by many different names.

His solution was to create a search using the free Graphical Query Editor Addin which has been included in Logos base products since 2003. (If you don’t have the Addin installed, open Libronix DLS, click Tools | Libronix Update, and select it from the list.)

His query includes a word list so that the search picks up variations on the name of the doctrine, such as “preservation of the text,” “divine preservation,” etc. This is a great example of how versatile the Graphical Query tool is…it’s not just for biblical language searching!

I encourage you to check out the user’s post. If you want to run his search against your own books, it’s pretty easy to re-create from looking at his screenshot.

Or you can right-click on this link, choose to “Save Target As…”, save the file to “My Documents\Libronix DLS\GraphicalQueries,” then open and run it from within Libronix.

(Have I mentioned before that a cool benefit of the Libronix architecture is that most user-created files can be exchanged with other users via email attachments, just like any other computer file?)

I ran the search against my collection of journals and got dozens of excellent and relevant hits in 22 different articles.

We’re always on the lookout for posts like this from Logos users. Let the world know about the interesting things you’re doing with Logos Bible Software and we might blog you next!

Further reading:
Graphical Query Editor Tutorial

Logos Named a Best Christian Place to Work

The April issue of Christianity Today (p. 82) includes the results of the fourth annual Best Christian Places to Work survey, conducted by the Best Christian Workplaces Institute.

Logos Research Systems was selected as a Best Christian Place to Work for 2006!

Logos is listed alongside other organizations whose names you may recognize, such as Wycliffe Bible Translators, Dallas Theological Seminary, Crown Financial Ministries, and Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary.

Somewhere north of 10,600 employees at nearly 100 organizations around the U.S. were asked to fill out the survey, which posed questions around attraction and retention, motivation and commitment, Christian values, and a few other categories.

As someone who moved across the country four years ago to come work for Logos, I can say that I work with great group of people who make this a fun and rewarding place to come every day. It’s also a great feeling to play a role in equipping pastors, teachers, chaplains, students, and churchgoers all around the world with tools for better and richer Bible study.

Further reading:

Meet the Staff: Guillermo Powell

Guillermo Powell heads up the Spanish department at Logos, which is responsible for creating and promoting our Spanish language products to North America and the world. Guillermo was also the subject of a recent post about his trip to Perú.

Did you know that we offer a growing number of Spanish language collections, a Spanish toll-free order line — (800) 570-5400, a Spanish website complete with product demos in Spanish, Spanish support articles and training articles? Well, now you know.

Windows Media (2.1MB) | Quicktime (2.8MB)

Keepin’ the coffee warm

If you’ve read the Logos Bible Software Blog for awhile, you have probably heard us refer to the oh-so-cool automated espresso machine that does its part to keep Logos running smoothly.

And you’ve probably seen us refer to the Logos Clear Glass Mug. I use mine every day; it does the trick and does it well.

(pauses to sip from his double americano, no milk, no sugar)

But I don’t know that you’ve seen us extol the virtues of the Logos Insulated Travel Mug. This is a beautiful thing, it allows us to take 16 ounces of sweet java elixir from the machine out the door and on the road.

And it is the perfect conversation starter to tell your friends, neighbors, or even the person sitting next to you on the bus or train about your Bible software!

Logos Bible Software Desktop Backgrounds

Folks who plumb the depths of the Logos Bible Software website probably already know that we have a few desktop backgrounds available for download.

But if you are a newer Logos Bible Software user, or a new reader of this blog, you might not have found them yet. So check out this page that has all sorts of different resolutions of the two backgrounds we currently offer:

I’m a fan of Wallpaper #2, myself.