How to Retrieve Your Deleted Logos Notes

Documents.Logos.com lets you store your study notes, presentations, sentence diagrams, reading plans, and more—all in one place. And if you delete an important document, it’s easy to get your work back.

Here’s how to undelete files:

  1. Log in at Documents.Logos.com with your Logos.com credentials.
  2. Using the dropdown menu in the top-left corner, filter documents by visibility.
  3. Select “Deleted” to see all your deleted documents.

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  1. Just undelete the document you want back!

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If you don’t remember deleting a document, but you can’t seem to find it at Documents.Logos.com, it may be attached to a Faithlife group. Use the dropdown menu under your username to view your current groups and the documents associated with them.

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Documents.Logos.com makes it easy to collaborate and share. Start using it today!

How Ancient Thought Agreed (and Disagreed) with the Early Church

Stoicism, a school of Hellenistic thought founded in the third century BC and popular through AD 529, was more than a philosophy—it was a way of life. In this scope as a worldview, it was, writes Paul Tillich, “the only real alternative to Christianity in the Western world.”

But, fascinatingly, Stoicism shared more than scope with Christianity. It came to many of the same conclusions about how to think and live.

Who were the Stoics?

stoics-of-the-roman-era-collectionBeginning with Zeno of Citium, the Stoics located happiness not in goods or success but in virtue alone; they emphasized self-control as the path beyond destructive emotions. This self-control took the form of:

  • Meditation. The Stoics would, visualizing their personal futures, imagine the worst possible outcomes—not as distant, unlikely events, but as present sufferings. They sought to realize that even the worst misfortunes can be survived and are not worth fearing.
  • Training. They practiced rigorous physical discipline, from sexual abstinence to hard exercise to the avoidance of tempting foods.
  • Self-vigilance. They monitored their thoughts and emotions, seeking to avoid lust, greed, and ambition in favor of reason.

Seneca and Epictetus argued that a properly practicing Stoic was, in a sense, beyond misfortune. The Faithlife Study Bible’s article on Paul and the Stoics notes, “Stoics believed that the ideal sage was one who could face calamity and misfortune with casual indifference, feeling neither sorrow nor regret. Stoics were proud of their ability to endure hardships and often paraded their fortitude and strength through ‘hardship catalogs,’ which listed the adversities they had endured.” (It’s that serene indifference to misfortune that colors our modern sense of stoic.)

Similar notions of the self

If contemplation, discipline, and vigilance sound familiar, it’s because the early church and Stoicism were in so many ways alike. Both were characterized by:

  • An emphasis on hardship. As the FSB points out, Paul’s letters also feature “hardship catalogs”—for example, 2 Cor. 4:8–9 and 6:9–10. And, like the Stoics, Paul believed that enduring hardships leads to growth in character: he writes, “we rejoice in our sufferings, knowing that suffering produces endurance, and endurance produces character” (Rom. 5:3–5; cf. 1 Cor. 9:24–27).
  • A sense of man’s depravity, and a constant self-examination. Like the early Christians, the Stoics regarded humanity’s natural state, with its lust, ambition, and other impulses, as deeply flawed. Both worldviews focused on the observation of self and the suppression of wrong thought.
  • An inner freedom from the world. Adherents to both worldviews lived apart from the world’s shortcomings and hardships. The early Christians looked with hope to the world that is to come; the Stoics reminded themselves that all is predetermined and that misfortune is illusory.
  • An aversion to excess. Since the Stoics and the Christians both regarded greed as wrong thinking, they shared a distaste for material excess. For the Stoics, mere wealth wasn’t bad—it simply wasn’t good. “Wealth consists not in having great possessions,” said Epictetus, “but in having few wants.”

Differing notions of the divine

But, though Stoicism shared much with Christianity, it differed profoundly in its account of the divine. For the Stoics, the universe was “a vast quasi-rational being with intelligence and will” (FSB), whose animating force they called (what else?) logos. They didn’t believe in the afterlife; they did believe that the universe would end and then repeat itself.

(You’ll notice that the Stoic outlook far anticipated cosmologies we regard as modern. The notion of God as the universe’s totality reappeared with Spinoza and, famously, Einstein; eternal recurrence was taken up by Nietzsche and Schopenhauer.)
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Of course, Christianity’s and Stoicism’s distinct understandings of divinity entailed differing ways of life. Sharyn Dowd, in Reading Mark, notes that:

The Stoics . . . were also determinists; they believed that everything that happened was caused by the universal divine logos that pervaded and controlled all nature and human life. Therefore, the Stoics did not believe in petitionary prayer. People should accept the life circumstances decreed for them by the divine and not seek to change those circumstances in any way. (Emphasis added)

Even the Christian ascetics, so like the Stoics in their emphasis on discipline and their distaste for worldly excess, operated within different spheres and worked toward different goals:

  • For the Stoics, the work of self-examination was largely private. For the early Christian ascetics, penance and self-examination were deeply public, instantiated in professions of faith and confessions.
  • The Stoics sought self-control in order to master the self. The ascetics sought self-control in order to renounce the self.
  • For the Stoics, dependence on the world was to be replaced by dependence on oneself—”The wise person,” taught Seneca, “is self-sufficient.” Paul, in contrast, taught that Christians are profoundly dependent on God (FSB).
  • For the Stoics, love was at best suspect, toxic to self-sufficiency. For Paul and the early Christians, love was everything (FSB).

But despite these key differences, the parallels between Stoicism and Christianity—an emphasis on hardship, an understanding of humanity as innately flawed, a vigilant self-examination, an inner freedom, an aversion to excess—are remarkable.

* * *

diogenes-laertius-lives-of-eminent-philosophersStoicism was the immediate context within which early Christianity flourished—the great alternative in terms of scope as a worldview, the status quo that the church rejected in radical ways. To know the one is to better know the other.

Noet offers the key Stoic texts in the Stoics of the Roman Era Collection (currently 81% off on Community Pricing!), which sets you up with the core works of Seneca, Epictetus, and Marcus Aurelius. The early Stoics—Zeno, Cleanthes, and Chrysippus—left us less, but we can still study them in Diogenes Laertius’ invaluable Lives of Eminent Philosophers, on Community Pricing for 83% off.

Keep learning about Stoicism and Greco-Roman context: place your bids on the Stoics of the Roman Era Collection and Diogenes Laertius’ Lives of Eminent Philosophers.

Then deepen your library with Noet’s vast Classical Foundations Bundle—39 volumes of essential ancient and modern philosophy, 21 volumes of Greek and Latin resources, the famous Harvard Classics (designed as a Harvard education on a five-foot shelf), and the 1,114-volume Perseus Classics Collection.

P.S. Still not convinced that philosophy matters?

Create a Legacy at Your School with Logos 5!

Logos 5What if every seminary student had cutting-edge academic tools—word studies, lexicons, exegetical guides, reverse interlinears, and other original-language resources? What if they could study from an immense library of networked texts, full of classics, commentaries, and contemporary titles? And what if they could create bibliographies with ease?

For students at Dallas Theological Seminary (DTS), this isn’t a fantasy—it’s a reality!

Underwritten by generous donors and a small portion of students’ technology fees, DTS will be equipping more than 2,000 students with Logos 5 to aid their theological studies. This means that every student, no matter their income or educational program, will have access to the very best tools and resources for their biblical studies.

Logos 5: an invaluable tool

The best part of the DTS program is that, when students’ formal education is over, they’ll be able to take Logos 5 into their future ministry!

Logos 5 is more than a tool capable of academic-level study. It’s an important resource in the lives of pastors, counselors, youth leaders, and teachers. With Logos 5, these graduating students will be equipped with an immense library and helpful features to support a life’s work in the Word.

Make an investment in your alma mater!

Are you looking to make a lasting impact in the lives of students at your alma mater or another school? You can! Create a legacy with a donation of Logos 5 to the school of your choice.

If you’re interested in purchasing bulk licenses for your seminary or Bible college, please contact our sales team:

Academic SalesAcademic@Logos.com | (800) 878-4191

Logos Mobile Education Faculty Profile: Dr. Carl Sanders

Logos Bible Software recently announced an exciting opportunity for formal training in biblical and theological studies: Logos Mobile Education. Mobile Ed brings the professors, the library, the visual demonstrations of software features, and the online classroom community directly to you—on your desktop, laptop, or mobile device. It’s education where you are.

Introducing Dr. Carl Sanders

Logos Mobile Education launched with the Bible and Doctrine Foundations bundle. The curriculum includes four Introducing Bible Doctrine courses (TH101–104), and all four share a professor: Dr. Carl Sanders.

Dr. Sanders has taught at the college and seminary level since 1999 at several schools: Bethel University (St. Paul, MN), Northwestern College (St. Paul), and Washington Bible College (Washington, DC), where he also served as chair of the Bible and Theology Department (2003–12). He’s an associate professor of theology at Lancaster Bible College’s Capital Bible Seminary (Lancaster, PA). Dr. Sanders earned his bachelor’s degree from Pillsbury Baptist Bible College (Owatonna, MN), and his MDiv from Central Baptist Theological Seminary in Minneapolis. He also holds both a Master of Sacred Theology and a PhD in theological studies from Dallas Theological Seminary.

Sanders is well liked by his students for his down-to-earth presentation of Bible doctrine—students quickly learn that he loves talking about theology and has a quick wit. Among his strengths as a lecturer are his ability to distill information down to essential elements and his good-natured, fair way of explaining differences in theological positions. Sanders has a keen interest in urban ministry and has served for many years in racially diverse urban congregations. His interest in local church experience helps him practice theology in ways that reflect the diversity present in the body of Christ. He strives to make theology interesting and practical.

Start learning from Dr. Sanders and other leading scholars. Take the next step—or get started—on your journey to greater biblical and theological knowledge today with the Bible and Doctrine Foundations bundle.

Logos Mobile Education—it’s where you are.

Get Introductory Discounts on New Baker Collections!

Over the past year, we’ve made hundreds of new books from Baker Academic available in our format. If you don’t already have these books, now’s your chance to pick up a few bundles at discounted introductory prices.

You can get the following collections on sale through October 31—come Friday, November 1, the prices go up.

If you missed these titles as Pre-Pubs, or you’re simply looking to bulk up your library and get some nice discounts, this is your chance to get near-Pre-Pub savings on bestselling Baker collections. If you got some of these deals but missed a few, this is your second chance to complete your Baker library.

You’ll get an extra discount for any books you already own—just visit the product pages to see your special price!

  • With the Baker Gospel Studies Collection, you’ll get every volume on the Gospels in the Baker Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament—David L. Turner on Matthew, Robert H. Stein on Mark, Darrell L. Block’s two massive volumes on Luke, and Andreas Köstenberger on John. You’ll also get every volume on the Gospels in the Understanding the Bible Commentary series—formerly known as the New International Biblical Commentary. In addition to books from these sets, you’ll get Craig Keener’s book on miracles and his two-volume commentary on John, plus books by Brad H. Young, Francis J. Moloney, Graham H. Twelftree, and others.
  • The Walter A. Elwell Reference Collection contains the Evangelical Dictionary of Theology, the Baker Encyclopedia of Christian Apologetics, the Evangelical Dictionary of World Missions, and other bestselling reference titles from Baker.
  • With the Baker Studies in Apologetics Collection, you’ll get books by Norman Geisler, Paul Copan, William Lane Craig, and others, plus Michael L. Brown’s four-volume Answering Jewish Objections to Jesus. Whether you’re defending your faith, building up your own worldview, or simply wondering how to engage others’ questions, this collection is the perfect starting point.
  • If you’re looking for the ultimate preaching-resource library, you can’t do better than the Baker Studies on Preaching Collection. It contains books on every preaching topic you can think of: method, delivery, exegesis, and theology of preaching. You’ll also get two books’ worth of sermon illustrations—2,250 total.
  • The Baker Studies in Counseling Collection gives you key introductions by Paul D. Meier, Frank B. Minirth, and others. You’ll also get the Quick Scripture Reference for Counseling, the Baker Encyclopedia of Psychology and Counseling, Thomas C. Oden’s four-volume Classical Pastoral Care, and much more.

Remember, these discounts expire on October 31 at midnight (PDT)—act quickly to get near-Pre-Pub prices!

Logos 5: Use Clause Search to Find the Objects of Jesus’ Love

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris, who has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos seminars, provides many training materials.

Imagine that you’re studying John 11:5—in which John declares that Jesus loved Martha, Mary, and Lazarus—and you ask yourself, Who else does the NT record as an object of Jesus’ love? You’ll be happy to know that discovering the answer is simple with a Clause Search:

  • Click the Search icon to open the search panel.
  • Select Clause as the search type. (Note: Clause Search doesn’t appear in the Starter and Bronze base packages.) (A).
  • Select All Passages from the range dropdown list (B).
  • Select the SBLGNT from the Bible dropdown list (C).
  • Select Subject and English Verb from the list of search helps (D).

  • Notice that this query appears in the Find box: subject:A Man verb:to bury (E).

  • Replace A Man with Jesus in the Find box (F).
  • Replace bury with love in the Find box (G).

  • The final query looks like this: subject:Jesus verb:to love
  • Press the Enter key to generate the search.

You just located the places in the New Testament where the person Jesus (regardless of the words used to designate him) is the subject of a clause, and the verb is a Greek word translated as some form of the English word love(H).


If you know a little Greek, try this:

  • Select Subject and Greek Verb from the list of search helps (I).
  • Remove the Greek word from the Find box (J).

  • Begin typing this transliteration in the place of the removed Greek word: agap (K).
  • Select the search string that appears in the dropdown list (L).
  • Press the Enter key to generate the search.

Now you’ve located the places in the New Testament where the person Jesus (regardless of the words used to designate him) is the subject of a clause, and the verb is a form of the Greek lemma agapao(M).


 

 

To Live Is Christ, To Die Is Gain: An Interview with Matt Chandler

iPad mini giveawayToday’s interview is with Matt Chandler, coauthor of The Explicit Gospel and author of the new book To Live Is Christ, To Die Is Gain. To help kick-start The Gospel Tour, featuring Chandler and Tullian Tchividjian, we’ve partnered with David C. Cook to give away Logos 5 Silver, an iPad mini, a Logos edition of Chandler’s new book, and a Vyrso edition of Tchividjian’s new book (One Way Love). Enter to win by November 14!

1. What inspired you to write your new book, To Live Is Christ, To Die Is Gain? 

To Live Is Christ

After I converted to Christianity, my development was built upon following a moral code.  I did some of it well, but struggled in other areas, which saturated my heart with guilt rather than conviction, and filled my life with shame rather than delight.  The Holy Spirit used Philippians to awaken my heart and fill my life with the things that made me marvel at God’s goodness and grace.

2. To Live Is Christ confronts the issue of spiritual development—what’s your best piece of advice for becoming a mature Christian? What do you envision a “mature Christian” to be? 

I believe the Bible teaches that if you fill your life with the things that stir your affections for Jesus and avoid the things that rob your affections, while simultaneously seeking to put your sin to death, you’ll mature in a more visible and manifest way.

3. Your book is grounded in Paul’s letter to the Philippians. How can Paul’s story help modern-day Christians grow in their faith? 

The story we read about in Philippians is our story. We were rescued by Christ, have a tendency to wander, and are helped and held by our redeemer. The implications of that shape everything else in our lives, from relationships to money.

4. Philippians 1 says: “to live is Christ, and to die is gain”—why did you name your book after this verse? What special meaning does it hold for you? 

I think everyone assumes that the title is tied to my battle with brain cancer, but it’s not. I think that that simple line encompasses almost everything I want: to have my life, family, and church shaped by, led by, and empowered by the Holy Spirit. Meaning, we put Jesus at the focus of our lives and rejoice in the reality that death is dead.

5. What’s one thing you hope people walk away with from this book?

I want people walking away with hope—that the God who saved them has every intention of sanctifying them. It might not feel like a six-lane superhighway, but God is at work. Trust him, press into him; he cares for you.

6. How did the idea of The Gospel Tour get started? 

We (Tullian, David C. Cook, and Doug Hudson) began talking about what it might look like to try and encourage men and women with a night full of gospel goodness. My hope for the tour is my same hope for the book: to encourage the saints and be used by God as a conduit of hope in the journey toward Christlikeness.

***

Until November 14, enter The Gospel Tour giveaway for your chance to win Logos 5, an iPad mini, and free ebooks! 

Grasp the Bible’s Jewish Context: Get These 5 Discounted Pre-Pubs!

Judaism represents several millennia of rich history, complex debates, and influential texts. So why is it important to study ancient Judaism now? Because the study of ancient Judaism is the study of the cultural context in which Scripture was created. A clearer understanding of Judaism leads to a more contextualized understanding of God’s Word.

Discover new insights into ancient context: get these five Pre-Pubs on early Judaism at a great price. They’re about to ship, so pre-order now before the price goes up!

Get 40% off Text and Studies on Ancient Judaism (3 vols.)Text and Studies on Ancient Judaism

Regularly $149.95—get it for $89.95

This resource contributes substantial evidence on the Dead Sea Scrolls, Second Temple Judaism, and Samaritan studies. These volumes provide rare ancient texts and modern translations, and challenge popular assumptions about the Book of Giants, the Samaritans, and the Qumran community.

Get 36% off the T&T Clark Jewish Studies Collection (6 vols.)

Regularly $139.95—get it for $89.95

Get a detailed look at key issues surrounding early Jewish and Christian thought. These volumes offer clear, up-to-date studies on Jewish narrative texts from the Hellenistic period, the view of salvation in Second Temple literature, and the concept of the Messiah from Jewish and Christian perspectives.

Get 39% off the Biblical and Judaic Studies from the University of California Series (10 vols.)

Regularly $279.95—get it for $169.95

Biblical and Judaic Studies

This series brings together the writings of top scholars in ancient Judaic history, politics, language, and literature, and offers original arguments on ancient cultures. These well-researched critical volumes serve as an invaluable resource for students and scholars of Near Eastern studies, as well as anyone else interested in the details of Judaic history.

Get 22% off the Early Judaism Collection (5 vols.)

Regularly $114.95—get it for $89.95

Learn from the experts: get 50 years’ worth of research on early Judaism. With insights from George W. E. Nickelsburg and E. P. Sanders, whose Jesus and Judaism profoundly influenced scholars like N. T. Wright and James D. G. Dunn, this collection provides fresh translations of primary texts and explores key issues in early Judaism.

Get 20% off Wipf & Stock Topics in Jewish Studies (3 vols.)Wipf Jewish Studies

Regularly $49.95—get it for $39.95

These three volumes provide a thought-provoking analysis of identity, memory, and Zionism. Explore the complexity of Messianic Jewish identity, and examine multiple Christian perspectives on the conflict in Israel and the relationship between Zionism and Christianity.

Act now to get the best prices: pre-order these titles before they ship!

Bid Now on the Best Latin Dictionary for Historical and Theological Study

Last month, we released a massive update to the Perseus Classics Collection, adding morph tagging for all 259 Latin texts. This month, we’re promoting the best Latin dictionary for engaging those texts: Lewis and Short’s Latin Dictionary, better known as “Lewis and Short.”

The authority on classical through early-modern Latin

coverLewis and Short is the go-to resource for studying classical, medieval, Renaissance, and early-modern Latin texts. With over 2,000 pages of detailed lexical data, it’s simply the best single-volume Latin dictionary to have in your Logos library. With Lewis and Short, you can quickly and easily move from individual words in the Latin Perseus texts to their entries in Lewis and Short. Consulting definitions and exploring contextual usage has never been easier.

Grasp scriptural context

You might be asking, Why would I want to study Latin texts if I’m focused on Bible study? For starters, studying Latin enables you to engage the primary texts of the Roman era, which help you better understand the context in which the New Testament and early Christianity emerged. Ultimately, you’ll become a better student of the Greco-Roman world and New Testament backgrounds.

plinyFor example, Pliny the Younger, the high-ranking Roman official, wrote letters that help us understand the inner workings of Roman imperial society—including the early imperial persecution of Christians. In a letter to Emperor Trajan (Letters, vol. 2, p. 405) , Pliny asks how he should carry out trials of suspected Christians. He describes his current method of interrogating them, and how their worship practices seem to be “nothing more than depraved and excessive superstition.” The earliest surviving Roman document to refer to early Christians, Pliny’s letter is of great historical importance for understanding the unfavorable conditions in which Christianity first spread.

Works like Livy’s History of Rome and Julius Caesar’s Civil Wars help us understand Roman history. Livy recounts the mythical founding of Rome to the reign of Augustus; Caesar’ writings describe the military conquests that transformed the Roman Republic into an empire. Studying Livy and Caesar helps us understand how Romans understood themselves—how they narrated their sense of self and history. Contrasted with an understanding of the Gospels, understanding these Roman writers makes Jesus’ proclamation of a kingdom of mercy, peace, and forgiveness even more radical.

A language rich in Christian tradition

summaWe haven’t even talked about the importance of Latin for studying theology. Though Rome eventually fell, the language of the empire lived on, serving as the official language of Christendom for over a millennium. The early apologetic works of Tertuallian and Minucius Felix, which laid the foundation for Latin Christianity, give us a glimpse of how early Latin Christians combated paganism. Augustine composed his Confessions in Latin; Thomas Aquinas‘ magisterial Summa Theologica, also written in Latin, represents Christianity’s highest theological expression in the medieval era. You can’t fully engage these important theological works without some acquaintance with Latin. What better dictionary to have in your Logos library than Lewis and Short?

Bid now on Lewis and Short’s Latin Dictionary to help put this important resource into production. You’ll get it for 82% off, but you need to bid quickly—it won’t be on Community Pricing forever.

Bid now at 82% off!

6 Ways Faithlife Makes Small Groups Better

faithlife-churchesJoining a small group is simultaneously the most rewarding and the most challenging part of many people’s church experience. Those who make the jump to hosting a group find their rewards and challenges multiplied. We built the digital faith community at Faithlife.com to minimize the friction that makes small groups difficult, allowing you to focus on the rewards.

Here are six ways Faithlife makes small groups better:

1. Study together—Something powerful happens when a whole community rallies around a passage of Scripture. God highlights different facets of the passage for each of us; we learn best when we learn together. With dozens of reading plans to choose from, you’re sure to fine one for every season.

2. Pray for one another—Faithlife makes it possible to share what’s on your heart without venting to the whole world. Privacy controls let you dictate exactly who sees what you post, so your messages reach as far as you want—and no farther.

3. Plan events—When is the group meeting? Where? Who’s bringing food? The Faithlife calendar tool takes all the guesswork out of planning your small group meetings. Plan all your meetings in the calendar’s tab to avoid confusion, and add the calendar widget to the sidebar to be sure that everyone knows the plan.

4. Share notesCommunity Notes remain one of the best-loved features in the Faithlife Study Bible app, perhaps because it’s so easy to share your notes with your faith community on Faithlife. The Documents tab stores notes of all kinds, including study notes made in your Faithlife app, setlists from Proclaim, and much more. You can upload discussion questions ahead of time, or pass around handouts without killing trees.

5. Protect privacy—Faithlife offers three levels of involvement to every group member: member, follower, and observer. At the member level, users are fully visible, and can post to the group. At the follower level, users can’t post, but they can like member-posted content. At the observer level, users can watch what’s going on, but their personal information isn’t revealed to anyone else. (This can be very helpful for anonymous support groups.) Use these three levels to keep folks involved and protect their privacy.

6. Send newsletters—With this new feature, you can create and send group newsletters right from Faithlife.com. Look for this new feature on the Newsletters tab, and learn to use it on the Faithlife blog.

The best part: you get all these benefits for a grand total of $0. Faithlife.com is free—there’s no cost to create or join a group. And you can compound its value by accessing your Faithlife group through the Faithlife Study Bible app—the world’s largest, most powerful study Bible.

Visit Faithlife.com to create your group today.