Clearing Off Shelf Space

So you upgraded to Scholar’s Library: Gold…or just bought Scholar’s Library…and now you have a new problem: What to do with all those print books gathering dust on your shelves?

A) You could archive them all, just in case you ever need them again. (Warning: as your bookshelves begin to extend out of your study, down the hallway, and into the “spare” room, your long-suffering spouse may take issue with this policy.)B) You could sell the books to finance future purchases of electronic volumes to add to your library. Or,C) You could give them away to a deserving person who would use them in study and ministry.

If C) sounds like a good option, you might want to take advantage of an opportunity to give some of your quality books to students and professors at New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary (NOBTS). Many personal libraries at the school were destroyed in the flooding caused by Hurricane Katrina, but an effort is underway to replace the lost books.

This week’s Preaching Now newsletter describes an effort coordinated by Jerry Barlow, the dean of graduate studies at NOBTS, to replace the print libraries of students and profs at the school.
If you have quality books in the areas of preaching, pastoral care, Old Testament or New Testament, you can box them up and ship them to:

Preaching Books Project
c/o Dr. Jerry Barlow
New Orleans Baptist Seminary
3939 Gentilly Blvd.
New Orleans, LA 70126

It sounds like a great way to ensure that those old friends of yours will continue to be loved and appreciated instead of gathering dust and being neglected. It might also be fun to surprise your spouse with a box of books leaving the house for once rather than arriving!

The Find Bar

There are more than 100 new features in Logos Bible Software 3. One of the smallest is becoming a favorite of many users.

The Edit > Find Dialog has been replaced with a Find Bar. You can open it on a report or resource by selecting Edit > Find from the menus, or pressing Ctrl+F. This opens a small toolbar at the bottom of the window where you can immediately start typing. It then searches the text in that window as you type, putting a little starburst on the first occurrence.

FindBarCloseup.jpg

The Find Next button (or Enter key) moves to the next occurrence. Find Previous (or Shift+Enter) moves back to the previous occurrence.

The Find feature is not a replacement for searching, but it’s very helpful when you know you’re in the right place, but want to quickly jump to a specific word or phrase. For example, you might open a very long article on Moses in the Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary and want to find where in the article Moses’ sister Miriam is mentioned. The Find feature takes you right there, without launching a whole-book or whole-library search.

Syntax: Not Just For Searching

In previous blog posts, I’ve focused on how the syntax databases we offer are used when searching, when asking questions of the text. But this is not the only use. I don’t even know if it will end up being the primary use. I was reminded about this with a recent comment on one of my posts:

These blogs are extremely helpful for things like [structure searching], but make it difficult for an average joe like me to get a search result and have confidence that all the cases of what I’m looking for would be covered. . .I’d think “what kind of clause component will this show up in that I’ll miss with this search”. Certainly, I’ll get some results I’d want, but will I get them all?

Instead of focusing more on searching, I figured I’d step back and show another use that doesn’t require any searching knowledge at all. Just being able to see the structure of the text in a different way is helpful when reading through the text.

We read through the text in translations with paragraphs/etc frequently. Reading through a syntax graph in addition to reading the text in modern translation can help us slow down when we read, and take note of not simply each word but also the things going on around each word at the clause level.

Ephesians 5.18b-21 offers a good example. I’ll give you two hints: Look only at the clauses (primary and embedded) and the verbs in those clauses, and the relationship between these things. No searching necessary. Just reading slowly paying attention to the annotated syntax.

And there’s a video (Flash, 3 megs, with sound) that provides a little more information to help in seeing how this can be done.

Here’s Eph 5.18b-21 in the ESV, just plain text. Read it in this form and try to think about the underlying structure of the text:

18 And do not get drunk with wine, for that is debauchery, but be filled with the Spirit, 19 addressing one another in psalms and hymns and spiritual songs, singing and making melody to the Lord with all your heart, 20 giving thanks always and for everything to God the Father in the name of our Lord Jesus Christ, 21 submitting to one another out of reverence for Christ. (Eph 5.18-21, ESV)

What can we see from just looking at the syntax here? Check out the video for more explanation, but in short, you’ll see how to:

  • View only clause information in your graph, removing some of the word group annotation since we’re just looking at clause level data here
  • Find verbs in the annotation
  • Show why this is relevant when looking at the annotation for Ephesians 5.18b-21 (which is a whole primary clause)

Update: If you’re interested in using the Lexham Syntactic Greek New Testament to assist as you’re reading through the text, check out this post from May 2006. It’s a handy way to work through the Greek text of, say, First John and beef up your knowledge of the syntactic goings-on at the same time!

Update II: Note that I’ve blogged again about how reading the syntax graph can help when analyzing or outlining a particular passage: Organizing an Outline with Syntax Graphs.

Bible Word Study Report Part VI: Lemma Reports

This is the sixth post in my on-going series on the Bible Word Study (BWS) report.
This post will look into the Lemma Report sections of the BWS report.

To refresh our collective memories, we’re looking at 1Th 2.16. Here it is in the reverse interlinear, with the phrase in question marked up using new Visual Markup features.

The Lemma Report sections have to do with understanding how the study word (ἀναπληρόω) is used both inside of the Greek New Testament and in other Greek literature, like the LXX (Greek Old Testament) and the Works of Philo.

Continue Reading…

Spanish Department on the Road

In May, Guillermo and Rob of the Spanish department hit the road with Logos 3. First stop was Expolit in Miami, which is the largest book fair for Spanish language Christian literature in the world. This was a great time to develop our network of international distributors, connect with individual customers and publishers and sample some of the tasty restaurants of Miami (in that order, of course). The world of Spanish Christian literature is growing at an incredible pace and it is exciting to be part of it all.

After Expolit they split up. Guillermo traveled to Lima, Perú, to participate in the “Excellence in Training” conference organized by Overseas Council International. The conference aimed at strengthening the leadership of Spanish seminaries. Attendees were presidents and deans of seminaries from 17 different countries. Logos presented the tools and resources that students and faculty have available in their language and also proposed the development of new resources for the study of the Hebrew language. Logos is excited to partner with experienced and knowledgeable experts in Latin America to facilitate this development. More to come on that in the near future. A rather interesting side trip was a visit to “El Hueco”, the piracy mall of Peru. Here the visitor can buy a pirated copy of anything, including newly released DVD movies complete with plastic case and picture insert for US $0.50! Fortunately there was no Libronix on display (and no, he didn’t buy anything, tempting as it was).
Meanwhile, Rob had already boarded a plane to Spain right after Expolit. There he hooked up with Jon Haley, a great supporter of Logos, to put on some presentations and training. Jon uses our Biblioteca de Estudio Bíblico in the distance ed school for Spaniards that he started last year. The response to our presentations was enthusiastic and it showed us that Spain is bound to be a growing market. It’s also a fun place to visit! Rob drove by too many castles to keep track of and also visited the Church of the Sagrada Familia in Barcelona, a famous architectural marvel that has been under construction for over 80 years. The trip to Barcelona also provided an opportunity to visit our publishing partner Clie, which is the largest Christian publisher in the Spanish world.



June in Texas

Landon is doing the second leg of the Bible Road Trip; this is his fourth post from the road (read previous Road Trip posts).

It’s been a while since my last post, but we haven’t gone far! For the last ten days we’ve been sweltering across Texas, stopping to stun serious Bible students with this stupendous software. Seriously, it’s been a super time! As we leave today to head into other states for the last week of our 5 week leg, let’s catch you up on the stops around the “Lone Star” State.


We started in Dallas a weekend ago at St John’s Missionary Baptist Church and Denton Bible Church. It was great to see a good turnout from two churches in the same city. I’m thankful to see our prayers answered in that these events are appealing citywide (and further!).

We had a nanny come and stay for the next few days. Actually it was just my sister, Kay Vollans, who is in her last year of graduate work at Abilene Christian University, and who joined us for a few days on the “Bible Bus”. Aunt Kay and Taylor got to spend some quality time together as we headed to Austin for our stop at First Evangelical Free Church.

This proved to be a very special stop as we had some distinguished guests (at least in Logos lore) in attendance. Nicole Dossey, a former Academic Sales Manager, lives in Austin where her husband (a former Logos developer) now works. Nicole was the person who helped me get my job at Logos and it was great to have her in attendance.

Also there were Bradley and Susan Grainger; two employees at Logos who just happened to be on vacation visiting the Dosseys. Bradley is one of our software developers and it was nice to watch him soak in the great response we had from the crowd there who was amazed (like all our other groups!) with what a light-year leap we have taken with Logos 3. It must have been neat to get that type of perspective on his work helping to develop these tools (for people like you and me) to study God’s Word more effectively.


On Tuesday, we stopped in San Antonio, where we took in some hometown Texas cooking at Bill Miller’s BBQ. We enjoyed the brisket and beans, sweet tea (served in a bucket, of course!), and a slice of pecan pie (my favorite!). The day off on Wednesday afforded us a rare opportunity to relax and we spent some time at the pool at Blazing Star RV park.

Thursday and Friday night we had churches in Houston welcome the Bible Road Trip as we stopped at Impact Church of Christ and West Houston Bible Church.
Dr. Robert Dean, Jr is the pastor at West Houston. I spent most of Friday with him and members of his Logos users ministerial association, training and teaching them how to use some of the 100 new features of Logos 3. That day, the members of his church came out in droves and helped with refreshments and other things to make that night one of the most successful nights of the Road Trip with over 75 people in attendance!

So Texas, I guess it’s so long, partner! And as they say, “y’all come back now, y’ hear”?


From here, we head out to Louisiana, Arkansas, and Tennessee where we will hand off the RV to Scott Lindsey and his family after an 11-state, 17-city, and 4,800-mile leg of this awesome endeavor for His glory.

If you live in one of these states, RSVP for an event this week and bring along a friend to introduce them to this amazing tool. And if you see the RV, be sure to wave!

From the RV,

The Norton Three (plus 1)

Syntax Search Example: Preposition with Dative Object

On the Logos Newsgroups, a user asked a question about syntax searching:

I’d like to search for every instance of the construction in Heb 1:2 — ἐν υἱῷ – i.e. ἐν followed by noun without article … Also (I think) in 1 Thess 1:5 – ἐν λόγῳ — our gospel did not come to you not simply “by means of word\speech”

I could do a normal search, but is this a category of construction that I could find with a syntax search? If so, could someone perhaps suggest how to go about it?

The answer is a resounding “YES!” It was like a slow-pitch softball that I couldn’t resist swinging at. So I did. You can watch the video now (Flash, 9 megs, with sound) but be sure to read the rest of the post too.

I should note that I’m running 3.0a beta 2, and you may see some visual changes inside of the Syntax Search Dialog.

Continue Reading…

Is Logos 3 “An Essential Part of Any Preacher’s Tool Kit”?

The first independent, published review of Logos Bible Software 3 is in…and Logos scored two thumbs up!

The review will be published in the October issue of the Journal of the Evangelical Homiletics Society but we received permission to post it to Logos.com in advance. You can head over to read it right now.

Or, if you don’t mind a plot spoiler, here’s an excerpt:

“There are many Bible research programs available today and each one has its own strengths and weaknesses. One of the tremendous strengths of the Logos products is the incredible number of reference works available either in a package like this one or in separate products that can be added to one’s library. No other program comes close to providing us with so much valuable (and searchable) material. Anyone who spends much of their life studying, teaching and preaching the Bible will want to have this program or one of its sisters (the Scholar’s Library or Scholar’s Library Gold). Such programs are rightfully becoming an essential part of any preacher’s (or scholar’s) tool kit.” (More…)

The journal is primarily by and for homiletics professors (I guess that would make them “preacher teachers”?) at seminaries and Bible colleges across North America. It’s also read by pastors, evangelists, and others with an interest in preaching.

The author of this review is Dr. Roy Ciampa, Ph.D., associate professor of NT and director of the Th.M. program in biblical studies at Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary.

This is the first of many reviews that will appear in print over the coming months. I find it interesting that each one adds another dimension to the evaluation of the product and each reveals a different perspective on what’s important in a Bible software package and to whom it’s important. With a diverse user base and a large, multi-faceted product this makes sense.

If you’ve never seen our software review archive, check it out…chances are good that your denominational publication or favorite journal or magazine has reviewed Logos Bible Software and you can get their perspective on it.

Be sure to check that reviews page or the Newest Reviews section of the Logos.com homepage or subscribe to the RSS feed to see new reviews as they are posted.

How is that Hebrew or Greek Word Translated?

One feature request that we’ve had a lot in the past 10 years or so runs something like this:

So, I have this Greek word. I want to know all the ways it is translated in the New Testament. How do I do that?

Another similar question is frequently asked as well:

What are the different Greek words that get translated as this English word in the New Testament?

We couldn’t always answer these questions before. In some ways, we could use Strong’s numbers as a bridge, but it wasn’t one-click easy to search the text to answer these sorts of questions.
With Reverse Interlinears, answering these questions is quick, easy, and elegant.

You’re using Logos 3 and hadn’t realized this yet? That’s OK, there is a lot of new stuff in Logos 3.
I figured I’d make a video to run you through how to use Reverse Interlinears to start to answer these questions as you study the Bible.

For those of you who haven’t upgraded and added Reverse Interlinears yet … you can do that on our upgrade page.

Bible Word Study Report Part V: Translation

This is the fifth post in my on-going series on the Bible Word Study (BWS) report.
This post will look into the Translation section of the BWS report.

To refresh our collective memories, we’re looking at 1Th 2.16. Here it is in the reverse interlinear, with the phrase in question marked up using new Visual Markup features.

Continue Reading…