Deep South in Summer

Scott Lindsey is doing the third leg of the Bible Road Trip. Read previous posts and view photos from the Road Trip.

The 3rd leg of the Logos Bible Road Trip began June 16th in Nashville when my family and I took the keys from Landon Norton and his family.

We spent Saturday with Morris and Cindy Proctor. The ladies took off for the RC Cola and Moon Pie festival in Bell Buckle, TN, and Morris gave me the grand tour of the new Morris Proctor Seminars headquarters. I was amazed to see all the new Logos 3.0 training materials Morris has produced. Make sure and check out the Camp Logos schedule and attend a Camp Logos coming to your neck of the woods – with over 100 new features and updates in Logos 3, Camp Logos is a great place to get the most from your Logos investment.

The evening was capped off with an incredible lasagna dinner prepared by Cindy and then it was off for our first night in the RV – by the way, there are six of us trekking through the U.S. in the Logos RV for the next 4 weeks: Scott, Michelle, Tayler – 13 years old, Beau – 12 years old, Autumn – 5 years old, and Chase – 3 years old. Please pray for my wife’s sanity over the next 4 weeks!!!
We had a very busy 1st week presenting Logos 3.0 in Nashville, Chattanooga, Birmingham, and twice in Atlanta. Wow, is it hot in the South!!! The 2 events in Atlanta were split between Walk Thru the Bible and Destiny Metropolitan Worship Church where Bryan Crute is the pastor of this dynamic fellowship. 125 people showed up for the Destiny stop making it the largest attended Road Trip event so far! Here are some encouraging words Pastor Crute had to say about the event:

“The Logos Bible Software Road Tour will prove to be one of the highlights of our year – our congregation was on the edge of their seats during the entire presentation! I can’t say thank you enough to the Logos family for its commitment to fuse technology with faith and create a tool that will strengthen the spiritual core of a weakened church. Thank you Scott and the Logos family for your commitment to equipping the Body of Christ and helping us become “workmen who do not need to be ashamed, accurately handling the word of truth.” (II Timothy 2:15)” – Pastor Bryan Crute, Destiny Metropolitan Worship Church

We spent Saturday with our dear friends Jon and Heather Langford of Loganville, GA. As we were preparing to spend the day sightseeing we heard a knock on the door of the RV. I opened the door and was greeted by Roger Brock. Roger is a demolitions expert and was driving through the neighborhood when he noticed the Logos RV. [Insert joke here about Roger wanting to finish the job Landon started. —Ed.] He pulled over to find out what Logos was all about. After a brief 10-minute demo of Logos in the RV kitchen, Roger sped away (literally burnt a little rubber) to talk with his wife about what he witnessed. 15 minutes later Roger was back with check in hand and is now the proud owner of Scholar’s Library. What a great start to our day with the Langfords!
The day got even better after our friends took us to the restaurant voted “Best Southern Cooking” where I had the awesome privilege of tasting fried green tomatoes…after reading this post my wife wanted me to be more specific and mention that I ate at least 15 fried green tomatoes! If you’re ever in the Atlanta area you have to visit The Blue Willow Inn in Social Circle, Georgia – probably the best food I have ever had.

After Atlanta we headed down to Florida…I’ll write another blog post soon to let you know how things are going in the Sunshine State.

Syntax and Linguistics

Logos Bible Software 3 offers syntactic databases for the Hebrew Bible and for the Greek New Testament. Some of these resources (the Andersen-Forbes Analyzed Text and Phrase Marker Analysis and also the OpenText.org Syntactically Analyzed Greek New Testament) are informed to one degree or another by linguistics.

I can hear the feedback now: “Huh? Linguistics? Why? Isn’t syntax just syntax? You mean I need to learn about linguistics too?!

David Alan Black, in his helpful book Linguistics for Students of New Testament Greek, describes the importance of linguistics for students of New Testament Greek in this way:

When we study linguistics we are learning how to put the Greek language in its rightful place as a part — perhaps the most technical part — of our work in the text of the New Testament. Through exposure and practice, we can acquire a broader, more confident command of New Testament Greek. …But more importantly, the study of linguistics can contribute a great deal to our understanding of the meaning of the New Testament. It can help us become more aware of why we understand a text the way we do when we read it, and it can help us talk about the text more precisely, by providing us with a methodology through which we can show how interpretation is in part derived from grammatical considerations. Linguistics may also help solve problems of interpretation by showing us why one meaning is possible but not another. Above all, however, linguistics can give us a point of view, a way of looking at a text that will help us develop a consistent analysis, and prompt us to ask questions about the language of the text that we might have otherwise overlooked. (Black 3, emphasis mine)

I’ve highlighted the final portion of the quote because it describes so well one of the primary ways in which the syntax graphs (more on graphs here, here and here) for both the Hebrew Bible (more here) and the Greek New Testament (more here and here) can be used in one’s study.

Much of the information about linguistics is already dealt with in the encoding of the databases. The syntax graphs merely make the underlying information explicit. They give you a picture to visualize the linguistic goings-on, here described mostly in terms of syntax.

The bottom line is if you start to read the text using the syntax graphs, a few things will happen.

  • First, you’ll slow down and take a look at the bigger picture.
  • Second, you’ll see clause structure (verbs, subjects, objects, etc.) that you likely would not have seen just reading through a paragraph of original language text.
  • Third, you’ll begin to look across passages for, say, what sorts of things (objects/complements/adjuncts/adverbs/prepositional phrases) further modify verbs (predicators) to track action through a passage. You’ll start to look at subjects to see if the subject is the same, or if it changes.
  • Fourth, as you begin to look at the text in this different way, you’ll have different cues to remind you of things you’ve seen before.
  • Fifth, as Black notes, you’ll start to develop the basis on which to ask further questions of the text. You’ll notice new, different things. And those new, different things will complement your study of the text.

All of it will help you draw connections — here formulated on the basis of syntax and linguistics — to complement other connections you’ve already made based on other reading, morphology, commentary, text-critical aspects, and the like. In short, slowly reading through the syntax graph (by all means read the normal text first, and read translations too!), keeping track of the text at a syntactic level as opposed to just words on a page draws on other influences and helps with developing a larger picture of what’s going on in a particular passage.

$6,650 in Shipping Charges?

Today’s guest blogger, Mark Van Dyke, is the newest member of the Logos marketing department.
In addition to saving shelf space and being easy to replace, electronic books also lower moving costs, an important incentive considering Logos software is used by missionaries around the world. Considering the large number of resources in Logos’ higher end libraries (Scholar’s Library, Scholar’s Library: Silver and Scholar’s Library: Gold) the amount of money that is saved during a move to another continent more than pays for the software itself.

For example, when a missionary family of four moves to Nigeria the cost of shipping their baggage alone is approximately $1,300! *

If a missionary owned the corresponding print versions of Logos book collections the substantial cost of moving would increase even more. Below is a listing of the cost of airmailing the print versions of three libraries from the United States to Papua New Guinea. The weights of each respective collection are shown in parentheses.

  • Scholar’s Library (936 lbs.) – $3,125.50
  • Scholar’s Library: Silver (1,073 lbs.) – $4,921.00
  • Scholar’s Library: Gold (1,450 lbs.) – $6,650.00

When shipping from the United States to Mongolia, Chad, Estonia or Jordan the average cost of sending print versions of Scholar’s: Gold resources averages just under $5,000!

If the financial burden were not enough one should also consider the hours of back-breaking labor required in packing and unpacking the hundreds of books in each collection. We at Logos recommend the method of buying the books on one DVD and throwing the disc in your carry-on luggage.

* Figure provided by Serving in Mission

Syntax Search Example: More Searching for Qualification


Once again, in the home group study, I ran across a phrase that caused me to ask a question. This time I’m in First Thessalonians 5.2 and the phrase is “day of the Lord”.

Earlier, I’d searched for “What other things qualify παρουσία?” (see post here). In this example, I use that same search as a starting point (sort of like a template) to search for “What other things qualify ἡμέρα (‘day’)?”

So this video (Flash, 11 megs, with sound) shows how to load the old query (which was saved) and modify it.

But as I was making the video, I had a flash of insight: I could use the OpenText.org semantic domain tagging to search for something similar but not constrain myself to vocabulary. I could search for where references to deity qualified words in the time domain. So I run through that aspect of modifying the search as well.

250 Posts Later…

This is post #250 for the Logos Blog. We’ve posted nearly every weekday since the blog launched last July.

We’ve had posts on curry, coffee, and Christmas decorating. We’ve announced company news, introduced some of the Logos staff and our publishing partners, and shared in the joy and trials of the Bible Road Trip. We’ve also used the blog to pull back the curtain on new features of Logos Bible Software 3, explore new reports such as Bible Word Study in detail, give examples of how to use specific features, and introduce the concepts and resources of syntax.

To take this post beyond a pat on the back for the blogging team, let us hear from you. Leave a comment and let us know what you’ve most enjoyed, which posts stand out in your memory, what you’d like to see more of, and what we’re sorely lacking.

This communication channel is here to serve our users, so let us know what it is that keeps you coming back for more!

Revving Up the Publishing Juggernaut!

If you’ve been a Logos customer for very long, you’ve probably noticed that something has changed during the month of June. We used to post three or four new prepub titles per month, on average…this month we’ve already posted 11…with 4 new titles posted last week alone!

With some 2,000 books as part of the Continuum license, plus all the other contracts and books we have in the pipeline, we’ve had to ratchet things up a notch. A new guy in the marketing department, Zack Rock, is doing a great job of researching the books and crafting descriptions for the prepub page. He’s been cranking them out at a pace of 1-2 titles per day…so if you’ve fallen behind, here’s a quick update:

What’s New on the Prepub Page

Bible Study Helps


Books for Educators & Counselors

Greek Resources


Shipping Soon
This is your last chance to get a prepublication discount on the following titles. Once they ship, the price will go up so place your pre-order right away.

  • International Theological Commentary (27 vols)This commentary emphasizes the theology of the Old Testament, combining excellence in scholarship with relevant insight for today’s church. The Last Chance email already went out; we should be getting this back from replication soon, and will ship shortly after the Independence Day holiday.
  • Ryrie’s Basic Theology
    A clear and understandable systematic theology from a major figure in evangelicalism. Yes, this is the same guy who edited the widely-used Ryrie Study Bible. This title went through production very quickly. First posted to the prepub page May 25, it is due to ship around July 10.

Whew! That’s a lot and it’s just the new stuff…visit the prepub page to see a complete listing of what’s available at a prepub discount and take advantage of the opportunity to expand your library while saving some dough!

More Ways to Stay Abreast of the Juggernaut

  • NewsWire – email newsletter with the latest prepubs, sales, and more!
  • Prepub RSS Feed – keep up with the latest prepubs right in your feed reader, My Yahoo! homepage, Bloglines, etc.

Organizing an Outline with Syntax Graphs

Awhile back, I blogged on how syntax graphs aren’t just helpful when it comes to searching. They can be very helpful when reading through the text as well. And they can help one organize thoughts and approach when teaching or preaching on a passage.

A case in point is First Thessalonians 5.12-13. I dug into this passage in preparation for a home group Bible study. The OpenText.org Syntactically Analyzed Greek New Testament: Clause Analysis helped me to organize my thoughts on how this passage is structured, therefore it helped in thinking how this passage should be understood.

Continue Reading…

Handoff in Tennessee

Landon is doing the second leg of the Bible Road Trip; this is his final post from the road. Read previous posts and view photos from the Road Trip.

The last week of our 5-week leg of the Bible Road Trip started on an easterly route to Louisiana and we pulled in to Baton Rouge right in the middle of rush hour traffic. The Chapel on Campus hosted our event that night and I must admit it was pretty neat to drive the RV around Louisiana State University and right next to Tiger Stadium. I can’t imagine what that place must be like on an autumn Saturday afternoon.



Our event that night was coordinated by Bob Soule and Dee Alberty who are local Precept leaders and teachers. We enjoyed Dee’s homegrown Southern hospitality over breakfast the next morning and talked about ways to better equip Precept leaders with how to use this amazing tool in the awesome Bible studies done with Inductive Bible Study methods taught through Precept Ministries International.

I love spending time with Precept people around the country each year and since I’ve been working with Kay Arthur and Precept for two years, I’m a little bummed I won’t be in Chattanooga for our event there. Trust me, though, I was becoming a little road weary and fortunately, we had another day off Tuesday as our next stop in Little Rock was over 500 miles away.

We took our time heading up to our RV Park in Lake Village, LA halfway between the two cities and drove a little out of the way to visit the legendary Frisco Deli in Jackson, MS. This restaurant is owned by the father of our very own Phillip Malouf (in academic sales) and we were treated to the best ribs I may have ever had in my entire life! Seriously, if you ever go through Jackson (actually, Pearl) right off I-20, do NOT miss the chance to pull in and have Mitchell and the family put some on the smoker for you! From there, it was only a short little jaunt over to Vicksburg next where (since I am such a Civil War buff) we had to tour the National Battlefield of one of the most incredible Civil War battles. The USS Cairo is something everybody should see in their lifetime.

One of the greatest parts about my job in Ministry Relations is the privilege I have to work with some of the most renowned leaders and ministries in the world both introducing them to and training them how to use Logos. I already mentioned Kay above and Wednesday afforded me another highlight as I spent the afternoon at FamilyLife Ministries and met with Dennis Rainey, his wife Barbara, Bob Lepine, and Nancy Leigh DeMoss (of Revive Our Hearts Ministry).


Through the Logos ministry relations department, FamilyLife was introduced to Logos. They instantly fell in love with these tools because of their usefulness as a family tool for Christians looking to improve their Bible study and the application of God’s Word in the home. As I write, radio interviews we did at FamilyLife are promoting Logos to one of the biggest radio audiences in the nation. Still, even in my job, it’s rare to have a room or audience that has as much impact on the Body of Christ as was the case that day!

The next day after installing the upgrade on the Rainey’s home computer, I got back on the road as we headed out to Memphis, TN where we stayed next to Graceland, met Dr. David Olford and presented at Olford Ministries International. See what I mean? How often does one (even on my team!) have the privilege of serving both Dennis Rainey and David Olford at their headquarters – in one day!? Believe me, through the power of Logos Bible Software, leaders like this throughout the world are being equipped.

We ended up this final week (much to Krissy’s delight!) in Nashville last Friday night, where we had our final (of 25!) church presentations at Christ Presbyterian Church. Meeting Scott Lindsey and his family the next day (I’ve never seen kids rush a Game Cube quite that ferociously!), I was happy to hand off the keys to the next driver. Hopefully, he’ll remember to keep all the jacks up and the bedrooms in as he starts out on a month-long leg with his family of 6.

I’ve immensely enjoyed blogging about the Bible Road Trip and keeping you up-to-date with the latest happenings on the road (even through some humbling times!). It’s been quite a challenging endeavor out on the road, but I’ll cherish the memories always and am grateful for your support (both at the events and in prayer) for Krissy, Taylor, (Nicholas), and me as we’ve ministered to Bible students, Christian leaders, pastors, RV park passers-by, the occasional police officer and toll booth operator, and (hopefully) to you…showing people the amazing new Logos 3!

For His Glory,The Norton 3 (plus 1)

Syntax Search Example: What “Qualifies” another Word?

As folks who have followed these syntax search examples know, I’ve been in a home group Bible study that is going over First Thessalonians. This has served as the background for many of these syntax search examples.

In the process of doing this, I’ve noticed that I’ve begun to ask different questions of the text.

So when the study group was in 1Th 4.15, and when the word παρουσία occurs (yet again), I asked myself, “What other things qualify παρουσία?” Why did I ask that question? First, we need to define Qualifier:

Qualifier: A Qualifier is a modifier that in some way limits or constrains the scope of the word it modifies. Common examples of qualifiers are words in the genitive and dative case, and also negative particles functioning at the word group level.

Porter, S., O’Donnell, M. B., Reed, J. T., Tan, R., & OpenText.org. (2006; 2006). The OpenText.org
Syntactically Analyzed Greek New Testament Glossary
. Logos Research Systems, Inc.

So a Qualifier limits scope. In terms of παρουσία, which can be translated “return” or perhaps “coming”, when it occurs with a qualifier the qualifier limits the scope of the coming. Thus in phrases like “coming of the Lord”, the phrase “of the Lord” acts as the qualifier. It’s not just any “coming” or “return”, it is the return of the Lord. Just like in 1Th 4.15:

So when I ask the question “What other things qualify παρουσία?” I”m really asking “Are there any other similar sorts of ‘return’ or ‘coming’ phrases in the New Testament?” After all, to understand more how the word παρουσία is functioning here, it could help to see it operating in similar syntactic contexts — to see how παρουσία stands in relationship with other instances of words that modify it.

So I put together this video (Flash, 8.5 megs, with sound) to show how I constructed the query to find qualifiers of παρουσία.

After searching, ask yourself the question again: “What other things qualify παρουσία?” Now you have data to use when considering this question. As you evaluate the hits, you can ask further questions:

  • Are there any qualifiers that seem to repeat (hint: “his”, “of the Lord”, “of the son of man”, “of the Lord Jesus Christ”)?
  • What are the unique qualifiers (hint: 1Co 16.17; 2Co 7.6; Php 2.12, etc.)?
  • Is there anything that would allow one to say that the use of παρουσία in 1Th 4.15 is the same as or different from other syntactic usages?
  • If so, is 1Th 4.15 the use typical or non-typical?
  • How does the general understanding of the use of παρουσία with a qualifier in the New Testament affect how we look at the specific use of παρουσία in 1Th 4.15 (or does it)?

Here’s a link to the video: Flash, 8.5 megs, with sound

But note well: If you’d rather not go through the hoops of constructing the search as described in the video … just right-click the Greek word and run the Bible Word Study report. Check out the Grammatical Relationships section. One of the standard word relationships searched for is that of qualification. So this search is done automatically for you in the Bible Word Study report! No assembly required! And it even groups like qualifiers together, so you can see what repeats and what is unique just by looking at the result section.

Also note: A future post will show how to make this query even more generic and search for some things a little differently. So keep comin’ back!

More Thoughts on Shelf Space

Yesterday’s post about freeing up shelf space by donating books got me thinking about a newsgroup post I read some time back.

The newsgroup post was from a Logos user who wanted to calculate the number of linear feet that his electronic library would consume if it were a print library instead. The number he came up with was 220.5 linear feet to shelve the 1,544 volumes in his Libronix Digital Library System.

How did he come up with this number?

A standard calculation for building a library estimates 8 volumes per foot of shelf space. Reference books tend to be larger, so they are calculated at 5-7 volumes per foot. Since Logos Bible Software collections are a mix of reference and non-reference, this user chose a conservative 7 volumes per foot. 1,544 / 7 = 220.57

Just for fun, how many shelf feet of books are in a couple of our top-end collections?

Another way to think about the numbers: Scholar’s Library: Gold would fill the better part of six 3-foot wide shelving units with 5 shelves per unit. Placed along a wall end-to-end, those shelving units would take up more than 18 feet of wall space!

Any way you look at it, that’s a lot of books! Something for which to be grateful next time you put them all in your laptop bag to hop a plane or when you pack up to move…

And for something less frivolous, check out http://www.lovepackages.org, a non-profit organization that sends Christian books and other printed materials to countries like India and Nigeria where a significant percentage of the population reads English. Thanks to blog reader and Logos user Thomas Black for the tip!