Get the Newest Books at the Lowest Prices

Logos PrePubThe Pre-Publication program (or “Pre-Pub” for short) gives you the chance to push new books into Logos at the lowest possible prices.

Logos books are more than ordinary ebooks, which are essentially just print books on a screen.

Logos books are robust digital resources. They’re built by real humans—not computer scripts—who know that the phrase “first verse of the first epistle of John” needs to link to 1 John 1:1; that’s just one example of the thousands of decisions that only a real person can make when building a digital text. The result? You get high-quality digital editions that work across all your devices and with all our tools.

As you can imagine, building these kinds of digital editions is very expensive for us. And it’s an even bigger investment when you consider that we ship thousands of new books every year. That’s why, before we invest the resources in building a digital edition, we post the book on Pre-Pub at an extra-low price to see if there’s enough interest.

Or, to put it more briefly, with Pre-Pub:

  • You get the chance to pre-order the newest books at the best prices.
  • We can rest assured that our investment in building new books will benefit the most people.

Six things you need to know about Pre-Pub

  1. You get the lowest prices. In exchange for pre-ordering early—and helping us determine whether we should produce a Logos edition—we reward you with a lower price. In just about every instance, the Pre-Pub price is the lowest price ever for a product.
  2. Prices go up, but they don’t go down. As books get closer to meeting 100% of their costs—and when they go over 100%—prices often go up. If you pre-order early, you’ll be locked in at your price, even if the price goes up later. This means you shouldn’t wait to pre-order something you’ve got your eye on: the price could go up next week or next month—or even this afternoon.
  3. When you pre-order, we don’t charge your credit card. A pre-order is simply a reserved spot at the best price. We’ll only charge your card when we build the Logos edition and deliver it to you, and we’ll be sure to remind you a couple weeks beforehand.
  4. You can cancel at any time. You have nothing to lose by pre-ordering something you’ve got your eye on and then changing your mind later. And by pre-ordering, you’ll lock in today’s price even if the price goes up tomorrow.
  5. You get to be one of the first people to get the new resource. As soon as we produce the book, we deliver it to you and it downloads automatically. You’ll be able to access it on all your devices the moment it’s ready.
  6. You get to help Logos decide which resources to produce next. Products that move over 100% get into the production queue. If there’s a product under 100% you want to see in our format, your pre-order is your vote to move it closer to the front of the line. And it’s not always enough to place a pre-order for yourself—it’s also important that you tell your friends. Even something as simple as dropping a note on Facebook or Twitter can get the few extra orders needed to move something into production.

How to make sure you never miss another Pre-Pub deal

Because Pre-Pub prices go up over time, it’s important to keep up with the newest books and get in early. But with hundreds of new books going up every week, this can be a challenge.

That’s why we created an email list to keep you up to date on all the latest products.

When you sign up, you’ll get one email each weekday morning with a list of the previous day’s new books. You’ll be able to quickly scan the newest products, and you’ll never miss out on the best prices.

Sign up today!





5 Reasons Vyrso is the Best App for Christian Reading

Vyrso App

The free Vyrso app is unlike any other app for Christian reading. Here are five awesome things you can do with it:

1. Access thousands of Christian ebooks

Choose from the latest, best Christian titles—mysteries, devotionals, thrillers, pastoral guides, historical romances, political commentaries, and more! Vyrso’s always adding new books (like a never-before-published devotional from A. W. Tozer), so you’ll want to follow the Vyrso blog for updates.

2. Take your ebooks anywhere

Vyrso is available for both iOS and Android, so you can bring your personal reading material wherever you go! Plus, Vyrso’s mobile-friendly shopping experience lets you navigate titles with ease, enabling you to get the ebooks you want—wherever you are. You can also read your Vyrso books in Logos 5 and on Biblia.com.

3. Get free and discounted ebooks

From summer bundles to pre-order discounts to special sales, we offer low prices on thousands of ebooks by your favorite Christian authors. Plus, we give away free ebooks all the time! Here are a few we’re offering right now:

Vyrso's Best Deals

4. Use one-tap Bible references

With a touch, you can connect Scripture to your everyday reading. Simply tap a Scripture reference in your ebook, and Vyrso displays the verse in your preferred Bible translation. This saves you time and makes it easy to connect the Word with your daily reading.

5. Search your library with ease

Search your entire bookshelf by topic, author, and more. Our cross-library search tool locates the quotes and passages you’re looking for in no time. Just enter your query—Vyrso will find every place that your word or verse is referenced in each of your ebooks. You can highlight, take notes, and copy and paste.

Oh, and did we mention that the app is free?

Take advantage of Vyrso’s powerful features: download the Vyrso app today!

Get up to $100 Off the A. T. Robertson Collection!

A.T. Robertson

A. T. Robertson was born on this day in 1863. Through November 13, you can use coupon code ROBERTSON1 to get up to $100 off the A. T. Robertson Collection, and coupon code ROBERTSON2 to get up to $15 off Grammar of the Greek New Testament in the Light of Historical Research!

What’s in the A. T. Robertson Collection?

You’ll get:

  • Commentaries on Matthew, Luke, Acts, Philippians, and James
  • Works on Greek grammar and textual criticism
  • Numerous lectures and addresses
  • A biography of John Albert Broadus
  • Robertson’s 1916 Stone Lectures at Princeton Theological Seminary
  • His works on the life and ministry of Paul

Check out this excerpt from The Glory of Ministry: Paul’s Exultation in Preaching:

“There is no joy comparable to that of witnessing the conversion of souls under one’s own ministry. This was the joy of Jesus and it is possible for us to have it. A ministry in which souls are not saved misses the chief joy of service. It is small wonder that, in view of the solemn responsibility of such a ministry, Paul asks: ‘And who is sufficient for these things?’ The Greek order is even more emphatic: ‘And for these things who is sufficient?’ He has sketched in the bold contrast of life and death ‘these things.’ The word ‘sufficient’ means ‘fit’ or ‘qualified.’ Many a preacher has felt his utter inadequacy to meet such a situation. He has arrived, but he is not ready for his task. The stoutest heart may well sink before the work of the modern minister.”

Grammar of the Greek New Testament A.T. Robertson

What’s so special about Grammar of the Greek New Testament?

At over 1,500 pages, Robertson’s Grammar of the Greek New Testament in the Light of Historical Research is one of the most exhaustive descriptions of New Testament Greek ever produced.

No English-language reference grammar since Robertson’s covers NT Greek in such detail. Though you should, of course, stay abreast of the latest advances by supplementing your study with newer grammars, this is a key exegetical tool, and—especially with these limited-time savings—a terrific value.

* * *

Don’t miss out—this sale ends November 13. Use coupon code ROBERTSON2 to get Grammar of the Greek New Testament in the Light of Historical Research for up to $15 off, and coupon code ROBERTSON1 to get the A. T. Robertson Collection for up to $100 off!

Learn from 7 Great American Preachers

Right now, you can bid on sermon collections from some of American history’s most notable preachers. Without Logos, integrating these collections into your Bible study would be a challenge—they cover so much! With Logos, though, you can search by topic, jump to Scripture references, and access sermons from any of your devices. Revel in Beecher’s famous biography of Jesus, study the works of Rev. John Witherspoon, and be inspired by R. A. Torrey.

Here are seven collections you should bid on before it’s too late:

henry-ward-beecher-collection

1. Henry Ward Beecher Collection

Regularly $239.95—current bid is only $50

Henry Ward Beecher was, in Spurgeon’s words, “the Shakespeare of the Christian pulpit”; in Lincoln’s, “the most influential man in America.” Famed as his time’s most powerful American public speaker, and noted for his uncompromising moral stances, Beecher achieved social reform, led a dedicated, Christ-serving congregation, and brokered international peace—all from behind the pulpit.

2. The Complete Works of Thomas Smyth

Regularly $149.95—current bid is only $20

Thomas Smyth, born in Ireland, was nevertheless a key character in America’s nineteenth-century formation of Presbyterian doctrine and practice. He rose to prominence in the years preceding the Civil War; his Unity of the Human Race, which defended slaves’ full humanity, earned him the ire of southern slave owners. This 10-volume collection gives you Smyth’s many sermons, lectures, treatises, church guidelines, reviews, discourses, and articles.
the-works-of-the-rev-john-witherspoon

3. The Works of the Rev. John Witherspoon

Regularly $79.95—current bid is only $21

John Knox Witherspoon was a Presbyterian minister, a president of what is now Princeton University, and a signer of the US Declaration of Independence. As a politician, he was a staunch nationalist and republican; as a minister, he was an evangelical opponent of the Moderate Party of the Church of Scotland. This collection includes essays, observations, letters, speeches, and 47 sermons by this great thinker and preacher.

4. Selected Works of R. A. Torrey

Regularly $39.95—current bid is only $8

Reuben Archer Torrey captivated massive crowds with his passionate yet sensible appeals to Scripture, and wrote classics in theology, apologetics, Bible exposition, Christian living, and other fields. Torrey, possessed of almost encyclopedic biblical knowledge, used this knowledge to help readers apply Scripture in practical ways. These four volumes are lesser-known titles—additional pieces of wisdom and insight for studying not only the Bible, but also the practicalities of Christian life and ministry.

More sermon archives on Community Pricing:

  1. Horace Bushnell Collection (20 vols.)
  2. The Henry Clay Trumbull Collection (34 vols.)
  3. Works of William Porcher DuBose (7 vols.)

Stay tuned for upcoming posts featuring sixteenth- and seventeenth-century sermons.

Take advantage of Community Pricing savings on these inspirational sermon archives—place your bids today!

3 Noteworthy Deals (and 200 More)

Logos November Deals

We have over 200 resources on sale all November long! You don’t need a coupon code to take advantage of these awesome deals—just be sure to get them before the month is over.

Calvin and the History of Calvinism Collectioncalvin-and-the-history-of-calvinism-collection

Regularly $249.95
Get it for $164.95 through the end of November (that’s 34% off!)

This collection, containing some of the most important scholarship on Reformation history and the Calvinist movement, is a must no matter your theological bent. Calvinists will love the exploration of their origins. Others will glean a more complete understanding of the important questions that Calvin and others sought to answer. This is the largest discounted collection in the monthly sale; at less than $7/vol., it represents an extraordinary value.

A Compendium of Christian Theologycompendium-of-christian-theology-2nd-ed

Regularly $99.95
Get it for $32.95 through the end of November (that’s 67% off!)

These three volumes, unmatched in fairness and concision, constitute the authoritative textbook on dogmatic theology in the Wesleyan tradition. Your theological library would be incomplete without them.

journal-of-hebrew-scripturesJournal of Hebrew Scriptures

Regularly $179.95
Get it for $65.95 through the end of November (that’s 63% off!)

Only in Logos could you get a peer-reviewed academic journal, devoted to the study of the Hebrew Bible, networked—all 2,500-plus pages—with your entire digital library. Logos 5’s powerful search tools unlock these volumes’ wealth of information—through the end of the month, at a 63% discount.

These are some of the most noteworthy titles on sale this month, but there are many more. Browse all the November deals today!

This Year’s Black Friday Deals Are Up to You!

Logos Black Friday Sale

Black Friday is drawing near, and with it, one of our most anticipated sales of the year. This year, we’re making things even more exciting. You can pick the deals by placing items on your wish list!

Have you been wanting to add the Tyndale Commentaries collection to your library, but just haven’t been able to fit it into your budget? Would a significant discount make it possible to buy Geisler’s Systematic Theology? Would Boice’s Expositional Commentaries help bring your preaching to the next level? Add them to your wish list—if they’re among the most popular wish-list items, they’re likely to be put on sale.

All deals will be announced on Friday, November 29, and run through Monday, December 2; check back here to see what they are!

How do I add resources to my wish list?

When you’re signed in to your Logos.com account, you’ll find “Add to wish list” links on live product pages and search results. Click these links to build your wish list. Reviewing your wish list is as easy as going to your account and clicking the “Wish List” tab.

If you hit the “Edit” link at the top of your wish list, you can give your list a specific name, see when you added items, and make it private or—coming soon—public.

You can also make multiple wish lists in case you want, say, one specifically for commentaries or ministry books, or one that’s public.

Start adding items to your wish lists today, and encourage your friends to do the same!

Logos 5: Word Count in Word List

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris, who has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos seminars, provides many training materials.

A Logos user recently contacted me with this question:

I’m just beginning research into Luke-Acts, and I need to count Greek words in chapters and sections. Can this be done in Logos?

The answer is a resounding “Yes!” Logos uses a feature called Word List to count words. Here’s how to take advantage of it:

  • Choose Documents | Word List.
  • Name the list (A).

  • Click Add (B).
  • Select your desired Bible from the Bible dropdown list (C).
  • Type a passage, like Acts 1, in the Reference box that appears under Add lemmas from [selected Bible] (D).

  • Press Enter to generate the list.
  • Drag the column header Count to the area above the column headers to sort the words by number of occurrences. (If this header isn’t visible, right-click any column header and select Count.) (E)
  • Click the column header Count to arrange the words in ascending/descending order according to the number of occurrences (F).
  • Right-click a number in the list to Collapse all or Expand all the occurrences at once (G).

There you have it—a great way to look for recurring themes or subjects throughout a biblical passage!

Free Book: The Works of Richard Sibbes, vol. 1

the-works-of-richard-sibbes-vol-1All November long, you can get volume 1 of The Works of Richard Sibbes for free!

“The winter prepares the earth for the spring, so do afflictions sanctified prepare the soul for glory.”
—Richard Sibbes

When was the last time you went through trials? How did they affect your relationship with Christ—were you encouraged in your faith, or did you feel abandoned? In The Bruised Reed, Richard Sibbes, the sixteenth- and seventeenth-century English theologian, takes on these questions and more. Sibbes uses the metaphor of bruising to describe how God enlightens us: hardships, we learn, come about as a way to drive us to God. Only when our pride is humbled are we able to grasp the sacrifices Christ made for us.

“I shall never cease to be grateful to Richard Sibbes, who was balm to my soul at a period in my life when I was overworked and badly overtired, and therefore subject in an unusual manner to the onslaughts of the devil. I found at that time that Richard Sibbes . . . was an unfailing remedy. His books, The Bruised Reed and The Soul’s Conflict, quieted, soothed, comforted, encouraged, and healed me.”
—Martyn Lloyd-Jones

Volume 1 of The Works of Richard Sibbes gives you not only The Bruised Reed, but also a preface by the editor and a detailed biography.

Download your free copy today, and then enter to win the complete Works of Richard Sibbes!

Get Over $150 Off Baker Studies on Paul!

The Logos edition of the Baker Studies on Paul Collection was released just last month—to celebrate, we’re offering a special discount all November long!

Baker Studies on Paul Collection (37 vols.)Baker Studies on Paul Collection

Regularly $752.35—get it for $599.95 with coupon code BSPC13 through November 30

This month only, take over $150 off the original price of the Baker Studies on Paul Collection1. This collection gives you 37 volumes on the life, letters, and legacy of one of the early church’s most influential figures—resources that’ll set you up to study Paul’s missionary travels, conversion, and theological contributions, as well as his letters’ cultural and historical context.

You’ll get a wealth of powerful resources, including:

  • Titles by John Piper, D. A. Carson, Gordon D. Fee, and more!
  • Baker Exegetical Commentaries on Romans, 1 Corinthians, Philippians, and Ephesians
  • Understanding the Bible Commentaries on Romans, 1 Corinthians, 2 Corinthians, Galatians, Ephesians, Colossians, Philemon, Philippians, 1 and 2 Thessalonians, 1 and 2 Timothy, and Titus

With Logos 5, this collection comes alive. All 37 volumes are easily searchable, and all Scripture passages link back to your preferred Bible translation and to the original-language texts. Significant theological concepts link to dictionaries, encyclopedias, and a bounty of other resources in your Logos library. And, for a limited time, you can use coupon code GET15OFF to get 15% off Logos 5.

* * *

Take advantage of November’s top product sale: use coupon code BSPC13 to get over $150 off the Baker Studies on Paul Collection (37 vols.)!

  1. Total savings may vary depending on your Dynamic Pricing discount. []

What if Life Were All about Pleasure?

Paul, in Acts 17:18, addresses adherents to two philosophical schools: Stoicism and the Epicureanism. We already know that the Stoics had much in common with the early Christians; not so the Epicureans, for whom life’s highest goal was individual pleasure.

But Epicureanism is worth studying as more than just early-church context. Though it fell out of favor in the third century AD, it nevertheless anticipated today’s intellectual climate in startling ways.

So, who were the Epicureans?

diogenes-laertius-lives-of-eminent-philosophers

  1. Moderates, not hedonists. “The philosophy,” notes the Faithlife Study Bible, “emphasized physical and intellectual pleasure and emotional calm (the most pleasure with the least pain).” But, though epicurean’s modern sense connotes excess, the ancients were moderates: Epicurus, quoted in Diogenes Laertius’ Lives of Eminent Philosophers, writes that “Nature’s wealth . . . is easy to procure; but the wealth of vain fancies recedes to an infinite distance.” Therefore,

    “When we say . . . that pleasure is the end and aim, we do not mean the pleasures of the prodigal or the pleasures of sensuality. . . . By pleasure we mean the absence of pain in the body and of trouble in the soul. It is not an unbroken succession of drinking-bouts and of revelry . . . it is sober reasoning . . . and banishing those beliefs through which the greatest tumults take possession of the soul.”

  2. Utilitarians. The Epicurean approach to pleasure was practical. They tolerated pain when it brought about greater pleasure; they obeyed social contracts to avoid crime’s anxiety, shame, and punishment; they did good deeds so that others might respond in kind.
  3. Empiricists. “[A]ll our notions are derived from perceptions,” wrote Epicurus, “either by actual contact or by analogy, or resemblance, or composition, with some slight aid from reasoning.” That is, the senses are the best criteria for knowledge.
  4. Atomists. They argued, notes the FSB, that “the world was made of atoms and that such material was all that the world contained.” Even the gods were made of atoms; so were souls.
  5. Believers in distant, nonintervening gods. Their gods were immortal, blissful, and almost infinitely distant—”limited beings” made from the same atomic stuff as humans, who, in their divine equanimity, didn’t care about evil and had “no real effect on the world” (FSB).
  6. Disbelievers in the afterlife. Since souls, made of atoms, disintegrate at death, and since the gods don’t care about evil, there’s no afterlife of divine punishment to fear. Instead, we should:

    “Accustom [ourselves] to believe that death is nothing to us, for good and evil imply sentience, and death is the privation of all sentience; therefore a right understanding that death is nothing to us makes the mortality of life enjoyable . . . by taking away the yearning after immortality. . . . Death, therefore, the most awful of evils, is nothing to us, seeing that, when we are, death is not come, and, when death is come, we are not.”

    For Epicurus, the fear of death was the “greatest anxiety of the human mind”—the pain most worth eliminating.

How did the Epicureans anticipate modernity?

classics-in-empiricist-philosophy-collectionAs you can see, Epicureanism disagreed with Christianity on an awful lot: cosmology, theodicy, the meaning of life.

No, its conclusions are familiar for another reason—they sound like those of modern secular culture.

  • Epicurean empiricism prefigured that of Locke, Berkeley, and Hume. In fact, it even came close to anticipating the idealism of the last two, according to which only perceptions exist, not objects. Epicurus writes, “the objects presented to madmen and to people in dreams are true, for they produce effects—i.e., movements in the mind—which that which is unreal never does” (emphasis added).
  • Epicurean atomism was remarkably similar to nineteenth-century atomic chemistry: atoms as indivisible, eternal building blocks, things as mere accumulations of atoms colliding with each other. More, the Epicureans came up with a “many worlds” cosmology long before twentieth-century quantum physics did, if for different reasons. Writes Epicurus:

    “there is an infinite number of worlds, some like this world, others unlike it. . . . For the [infinite] atoms out of which a world might arise, or by which a world might be formed, have not all been expended on one world or a finite number of worlds, whether like or unlike this one.”

  • Epicureanism’s matter-of-fact approach to social living shares much with Locke’s utilitarianism, and even modern libertarianism. Since individuals are their own best judges of how to live, society means essentially “Leave me free to maximize my pleasure; in turn, since I don’t want the negative repercussions, I won’t infringe on the freedom of others.” Libertarians, sound familiar?
  • The Epicureans thought the fear of death animated the rest of life’s anxieties; in the twentieth century, Heidegger and the existentialists agreed. (Of course, from there, their conclusions differed: For the Epicureans, the fear of death was illusory, to be transcended; for the existentialists, it was key to living bravely and authentically.)

Empiricism, atomism, extreme individuality, fear of death as the root of all anxiety—what makes these parallels really interesting is that they aren’t straighforward lines of influence. From the third century AD to the sixteenth, Epicureanism was almost entirely forgotten.

* * *

lucretius-on-the-nature-of-thingsThere are two reasons you should know Epicureanism:

  1. It, with Stoicism, was a big part of the context against which early Christianity established itself. Studying it helps you understand the early church—you’ll get more out of passages like Acts 17:18 and Phil. 3:18.
  2. As we’ve seen, it’s an indirect precursor to secular modernity—one that’s even more interesting for its indirectness. Even though Epicurean philosophy is largely forgotten, modernity tends toward the Epicurean; if you’re interested in engaging the culture, you’ll want to understand this fascinating echo.

Epicurus left us very little—Diogenes Laertius lays out his thought (and quotes him at length) in Lives of Eminent Philosophers, and Lucretius, in On the Nature of Things, builds on Epicurus’ destroyed magnum opus, On Nature. Luckily for scholars, we’re building Logos editions of both through Logos’ philosophy/classics division, Noet—and, right now, you can get these foundational texts on Community Pricing for $5 each. For such rich context, that’s a tiny investment.

Study ancient thought for the best price—bid now on Lives of Eminent Philosophers and On the Nature of Things.

Then build your library with Noet’s Ancient and Modern Philosophy bundles, or deepen your study with the immense Classical Foundations Bundle—124 volumes of philosophy, history, original-language scholarship, and literature.

P.S. Still not convinced that philosophy matters?