Logos Curry 2006: Columbus’ Loss

We mentioned our Sixth Annual Logos Curry Cook-Off last week and promised recipes of the top three curries.

Bob Pritchett’s curry “Columbus’ Loss” garnered the most votes in our 2006 Curry Cook-Off. Bob’s notes on the recipe are brief:

Here’s the recipe.

I used boneless chicken thighs and ground ginger. And the strongest cumin I’ve ever tasted.
— Bob

So if you like curry, check it out and slip it in the recipe box. The folks at Logos approve!

Of the Making of Books (Part 10)

Today’s guest blogger is Ken Smith, General Manager of Electronic Publishing Services at Logos.
(This is the next installment in a series of articles about our nearly 60 publishing partners who market their own electronic products using our technology.)

Baker Publishing Group
If you’ve been following this series from the beginning, you might remember that the first installment pictured a 1996 product from Baker. As one of our longest-standing partners, Baker Publishing Group has been involved with a number of projects, both as electronic publisher and licensor.

That first Baker product included just four books, but introduced some stellar reference titles like the Evangelical Commentary on the Bible and Topical Analysis of the Bible, both by Walter Elwell.

In July of 1998, Baker released a greatly expanded collection, titled The Baker Digital Reference Library, with twenty titles covering a broad range of topics including theology, apologetics, counseling and a new-fangled thing called the “Internet”.

BDRL

Baker followed this with two author-focused collections: The R.C. Sproul Digital Library and The Norman L. Geisler Apologetics Library.

In recent years, Baker has partnered with us by licensing a number of significant commentary sets and other core reference titles. These include Hendricksen and Kistemaker’s New Testament Commentary, the Baker Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament, and the 27 current volumes of the Boice Commentary Series.

Stay tuned for more great electronic resources from Baker—coming soon!
Next: World Evangelical Alliance

Who Did What? Looking at Verbs in a Reverse Interlinear

Earlier I blogged about Highlighting English based on Greek Morphology. This involved using Logos Bible Software 3 and a Reverse Interlinear of the New Testament to highlight words based on the underlying language’s morphology (word form, part-of-speech type information).

Over the past weekend I was thinking that this would be perfect to use when working through a text doing something like participant analysis. One thing that I find handy when working through a text at a paragraph/sentence level is to stop at each finite verb (verbs that aren’t participles or infinitives) and determine who is taking part in the action. I also like to see if there is someone or something that the action is being done to, or if there are other circumstances to the action.

Using Logos Bible Software 3, the Morphology Filter applied to a Reverse Interlinear makes this easy — particularly if you don’t know Greek. Here’s what you do.

  • First, check out the video on how to specify a morphology filter in a reverse interlinear.
  • Second, once your Logos Bible Software 3 is fired up, specify a morphology filter for the ESV New Testament Reverse Interlinear. Your Part of Speech should be Verb, the Verb Type should be Finite.
  • Third, specify the style of highlighting you’d like. I just specified yellow highlighting.
  • Fourth, go to your passage and stop at the highlights. Ask yourself questions like:
    • Who or what is doing this action? That is, who is the actor?
    • Who or what is the action being done to? That is, is there an object?
    • Are there additional circumstances to the action? Clarifying adverbs or prepositional phrases?
    • Is the same person/thing doing action here that was doing the action with the previous verb? Or has there been a shift?
    • [whatever other questions you think appropriate]

When examining the text at this level, you should keep track of where the same party (or parties) is doing the action, and where the actor changes. This may indicate secondary action (e.g., “Jim said, ‘When I was with Dorothy, she decided we’d have dinner at the Olive Garden’ “.) or it may indicate a larger shift at, say, a paragraph level.

Stopping at verbs and examining the flow of action in the passage is one very useful way to work through a passage at a high level. Using reverse interlinears to combine the underlying original language part-of-speech information with highlighted English makes it much easier for those with no knowledge of the original languages to start to consider these issues in their study.

2006 Logos Curry Cookoff

Last Friday was the sixth annual Logos Curry Cookoff. Logos Cookoffs are always fun days; the curry cookoff is one of the most fun. We had 17 different curries this year, and they were all excellent.
This year’s winners were:

  • Bob Pritchett with Columbus’ Loss
  • David Kaplan with Fire and Nice
  • James Van Noord with Green Monster

More pictures from the day are “below the fold”. We also hope to blog at least the top three recipes so Logos users can enjoy some curry at home, too.

Continue Reading…

Meet the Staff: Seth Thomas

In this video clip I turn the camera on Seth, who recently joined the marketing team at Logos and happens to be my office mate. For the record, we get along great.

Windows Media (1.6MB) | Quicktime (2.1MB)

Syntax: OpenText.org Clauses and Word Groups

Those who have followed the series of posts here regarding the OpenText.org Syntactically Analyzed Greek New Testament (see the syntax category archive) might be interested in the following articles on the OpenText.org site:

These articles walk through the basic annotation process, explaining the OpenText.org annotation process. In the midst of that, you get a great introduction to how and why the data is marked up like it is, which will help in considering how to use the syntactic information therein.

If you’re curious about the hows and whys of the Logos implementation of the OpenText.org material, then you need to read these articles.

Use Libronix to Search Your Print Books, Too!

Users on the always-active Logos newsgroups often amaze me with their ingenuity. They come up with some very inventive uses of Logos Bible Software, not to mention creating scripts and custom toolbars to tweak the application in various ways.

I was recently impressed by a very simple but useful idea that had never occurred to me: a newsgroup user* created a collection of books that he owns in print but doesn’t yet own electronically. When he wants to locate a phrase or word in one of those print books, he simply searches the collection of locked books to get the page number or section title. After that, it’s a matter of walking to the shelf, pulling down the print book, and opening it to the right place.

That’s right…Libronix DLS can provide a full-text, searchable index to some of your print books, too!

This works because 1) we let you search inside locked books and 2) we have some 5,000+ books to search. I’m sure you can think of how you might find it useful to search print books, but let’s look at an example.

Just the other day, you were reading along in one of your print books (if you’re like me, you can’t recall now which one) and happened across a great illustration of the satisfaction found in Christ. You remember that it was a quotation from Malcolm Muggeridge but that’s about it.

Libronix DLS makes it a 10-second task to run a search for “muggeridge” in the “My Print Books” collection you created, which points you to the R. Kent Hughes Preaching the Word commentary on Ephesians. Specifically, Hughes’ commentary on Ephesians 1:13.

A moment later, you have the print book in hand and are reading this quotation from Muggeridge:

I may, I suppose, regard myself, or pass for being, a relatively successful man. People occasionally stare at me in the streets — that’s fame. I can fairly easily earn enough to qualify for admission to the higher slopes of the Inland Revenue — that’s success. Furnished with money and a little fame even the elderly, if they care to, may partake of trendy diversions — that’s pleasure. It might happen once in a while that something I said or wrote was sufficiently heeded for me to persuade myself that it represented a serious impact on our time — that’s fulfillment. Yet I say to you, and I beg you to believe me, multiply these tiny triumphs by a million, add them all together, and they are nothing — less than nothing — a positive impediment — measured against one draught of that living water Christ offers to the spiritually thirsty — irrespective of who or what they are. What, I ask myself, does life hold, what is there in the works of time, in the past, now and to come, which could possibly be put in the balance against the refreshment of drinking that water?

Searching the full text of your print books is a great way to re-locate that half-forgotton passage or track down a place name or topic that might not appear in the printed book’s index. It’s not a substitute for owning the electronic edition, but it’s a nice added perk of the digital library system.

As a caveat, I should point out that not all locked books return equally useful search results. Depending on the structure of the book, the search results window may return chapter titles or section titles. This is especially true of older books that were not coded with page numbers.

If you’re convinced of the utility of this, you might be asking “How do I begin?”

It’s pretty simple, really. Just create a new collection (Tools | Define Collection) and when you do, uncheck the “Unlocked Resources Only” box. The titles accompanied by a yellow “padlock” icon are locked. Then it’s just a matter of adding the titles to your collection that you own in print. Of course, you can include both locked and unlocked titles.


To search your new collection, just click the Search button in the toolbar and select your collection.
* I would give credit to the newsgroup user who suggested this, but I can’t seem to recall who it was (par for the course) and couldn’t immediately locate the thread on the newsgroup.

It’s Here!

The Bible Road Trip Bus has arrived!

When I turned the corner onto Commercial Street yesterday morning, I had to slow down and gawk at a very large, decked-out RV parked in front of Logos.



I’m pretty sure the gawking will continue once this thing is on the road. It’s amazing.



Starting May 1, the Bible Road Trip Bus will begin its nationwide tour, spreading the word about Logos Bible Software 3. Before long, it will pull into a church or school near you. So make sure to sign up for a Bible Road Trip event.
You don’t want to miss the bus!

Syntax Search Example: Relative Pronouns

When working through a passage, it can be important to work through pronoun usage. Sometimes pronouns have direct referents, sometimes the referents are implied.
A familiar example is found in the first three verses of First John:

1 That whicha was from the beginning, whichb we have heard, whichc we have seen with our eyes, whichd we looked upon and have touched with our hands, concerning the word of life— 2 the life was made manifest, and we have seen it, and testify to it and proclaim to you the eternal lifef, whichf was with the Father and was made manifest to us— 3 that whiche we have seen and heard we proclaimabcde also to you, so that you too may have fellowship with us; and indeed our fellowship is with the Father and with his Son Jesus Christ. (1Jn 1.1-3, ESV)

In the above, the English words translated from relative pronouns are in bold, the pronoun referent is in bold italic text. Note use of superscript letters to align pronoun with specific referent as there are two referents in the above example.
How did I know that? Well, let’s just say that the Lexham Syntactic Greek New Testament and the Syntax Search dialog are my friends.

Continue Reading…

Meet the Staff: Scott Lindsey

Scott has probably accrued the most airline miles of any Logos employee. He’s also been known to sell Logos Bible Software to his seatmate.
Windows Media (2.9MB) | Quicktime (3.8MB)