Vote for Logos

As you may recall, we announced last month that Logos Bible Software 3 is nominated for Consumer Product of the Year by the Washington State technology industry association. In fact, this nomination means Logos is counted among the (cue soundtrack) HeroesofInnovation!

This year the association is doing a new thing: a Community’s Choice Award. In addition to the winners in each category there will be a kind of “people’s choice” winner as voted on by…the people.

That’s where you come in!

We’d really love to stand in front of 1,000 attendees at the awards ceremony—all of them creating greattechnology products that help people in various ways—and receive this award because you put us there. We think Logos is the most deserving technology and hope you agree.

(Don’t worry…this is all on the up and up. The awards committee asked us to get the word out to our constituents, asking you to vote.)

If you can take a moment to vote for Logos 3 (it doesn’t matter where you live), here’s how:

  1. You will have to create an account at the awards site.
  2. Next, vote for Logos Bible Software.

When the page refreshes you’ll see how we’re doing!

Thanks for being such great users…your passion for the product and for Bible study keeps us going!

46 Books Need a Nudge

A number of exciting titles on the prepub page are tantalizingly close to crossing the 100% threshold and moving into production. The five substantial collections listed below, which total 46 volumes in all,each need literally just a handful of pre-orders to push them over the line.

Just think, you could be the one toplace the final pre-order that moves one of these on to the next phase!

Gnostic & Apocryphal Studies Collection (10 Volumes)

The Gnostic & Apocryphal Studies Collection assembles titles dealing with Christian apocryphal literature, particularly those texts associated with the Gnostic tradition. Given their contemporary relevance, it is critical for the Christian to understand these ancient texts and evaluate their place within Christianity’s history.


Library of NT Studies: JSNTS on Paul (17 volumes)

Surveying a variety of aspects of Pauline Christianity, this collection canvasses topics as diverse as Paul’s political motivations, community-identity construction, the prevalence of non-Pauline interpolations in the Epistles, scalometry’s relevance to Paul’s writings, and many other fascinating issues. Written with the academic in mind, the progressive thought and timely analysis exhibited here will prove profitable to anyone wishing to study this complex apostle more deeply.


Understanding the Bible and Its World Collection (4 volumes)

The titles in this collection reveal the importance and place of the Septuagint, religious diversity in the Graeco-Roman world, ethics’ relation to the New Testament, and narrative art in the Bible. Written with the neophyte in mind, these titles nonetheless feature a level of astute scholarship that will interest even the most knowledgeable student of the Bible.


Near East Archaeology Collection (3 volumes)

The Near East Archaeology Collection presents the findings of several sites in the Near East. The three volumes examine Aegean sites, as well as sites in Jordon and in Israel. Topics include settlement patterns, pottery, iconography, cult, paleography, urbanism, and much more.


Ugaritic Library (12 volumes)

Ugaritic is the ancient language of one of Israel’s closest neighbors, the city state of Ras Shamra, located in what is now Syria. Ugaritic is from the same family of languages as Hebrew, Northwest Semitic. This means the Ugaritic texts are closely related to the Hebrew Bible, both linguistically and culturally.

The Ugaritic Library contains the complete corpus of Ugaritic texts together with aids and indices to better illuminate these ancient writings and the Hebrew Bible. These include grammatical and lexical books to help the reader learn and read Ugaritic, translations of many of the important documents (with commentary), and volumes designed to help the Bible student easily locate the places where Ugaritic can shed some light on the text of the Hebrew Bible.

Lecture Series Event Recap

Logos marketing assistantMark VanDyke, who has been instrumental in promoting the Lecture Series, shares this retrospective.


This past Monday, Logos presented the first Lecture Series event to a standing-room only crowd at Bellingham’s Mount Baker Theatre.

More than 160 peopleturned out to hear featured lecturer Dr. Rod Stiling of Seattle Pacific University, who spoke on “Interpretations of the Genesis Flood Before and After Darwin”.
The lecture focused mostly on American geology during the scientific revolution, specifically as it related to Noah’s flood.

One of the highlights of the night was Dr. Stiling’s incorporation of art into his lecture – often referring to how painters in the late 19th century viewed the flood.

The lecture was followed by a stimulating question and answer session filled with pointed questions about the effects that science can have on one’s faith and how Christians should approach the Bible with some knowledge of empirical evidence for what they believe.

The feedback submitted after the lecture was overwhelmingly positive – which is particularly gratifying due to the diverse crowd that had gathered to hear Dr. Stiling speak.

The next three lectures in the series are already lined up, so be sure to visit the Lecture Series page for all the details!

March 26, 2007Is the Old Testament Historically Reliable? Dr. Phil Long, Regent College

April 14, 2007Exploring the New Myths of Science and Science FictionDr. James A. Herrick, Hope College

May 5, 2007The Psalms and Our Destiny: Understanding the Message of the Book of PsalmsDr. Mark Futato, Reformed Theological Seminary

Advanced Technology for Eternal Truth

Today’s post is an excerpt from a recent NewsWire mailing

“The grass withers, the flower fades, but the word of our God will stand forever.” —Isaiah 40:8 (ESV)

I still choke up when I read that verse, and I pray that I always will.

Isaiah 40:8speaks volumes. It conveys more depth and richness of content in fifteen short words than some authors getacross in their entire collected life’s works.This powerfuldeclaration remindsus why we are here at Logos. We believe in this verse with all our hearts, and want to do everything in our power to make sure that during our brief time on this earth,we doas much as we areable to advance the study of God’s Word.

You have probably heard the story behind the founding of Logos Bible Software before: A couple of young Microsoft programmers with their entire careers of high-pay and lucrative Microsoft stock options ahead of them, dropped everything to join a partner and risk it all on pursuing their dream.

They weren’t satisfied with using their skills to help businessmen have access to the latest and greatest in technology just so they could be more productive or do better in business…

They wanted more.

They wanted to use those same skills to help God’s people in every walk of life have better access to the treasures of God’s Word.

They wanted to use the latest and greatest in technology to create tools for taking people deeper into Bible study than they ever thought possible.

“Advanced Technology for Eternal Truth”

Before anything else, we have a passion for God’s Word. In order to help you get the most fromGod’s Word, we relentlessly push technology to the limits, and make sure we are always up on the latest and greatest.

It is that passion that keeps everyone at Logos pushing technology forward. It is that passion that keeps us experimenting with the latest software and tools out there wherever they come from. It is that passion that ensures that your Logos Bible Software will continue to get better and better.

We promise that we will continue to push technology to the limits to make studying the Bible deeper, easier and better in every way possible.

Really, we are serious about this!

The most obvious benefit of our passion to help you get the most out of your Bible study is the ever-improving Logos Bible Software engine (the Libronix Digital Library System).Our passionfor making sure we are up on the latest and greatest technology ensures that you have uninterrupted access to the best Bible studysoftware in the world even when Microsoft releases new operating systems like Windows Vista, and new browsers like Internet Explorer 7.The latest version of Logos Bible Software is ready for both: Get it now.

Honestly, there is no catch!

Keeping up to date with the core engine in Logos Bible Software doesn’t cost a thing. There is no reason not to download the latest versionand stay current. Take a moment and make sure you are using the latest and greatest in technology by updating your engine for free: http://www.logos.com/support/download/30update

Experience just how far our passion has taken us…

There is no catch to the download. You can make sure you have the latest core engine at no cost just like we mentioned above…

…but if you are looking to do more than just keep your software current with the latest operating systems,or you want to see just how far our passion has taken us to create extra tools and add-ins to bring you new ways to dig deeper, read on.

After you update your core engine you should check out the individually customized upgradesale that is about to expire on collection upgrades. Download the update first, then if you want to jump light years ahead in your Bible study and add more great tools, add-ins and resources for pennies on the dollar, you should really check out our custom collection upgrades that are still on sale for just a month or so more at: http://www.logos.com/upgrade

Digital Exegesis How-To & Review of Personal Book Builder

The latest issue of Christian Computing Magazine includes two articles pertinent to Logos Bible Software.

The first is a review of Personal Book Builder by writer, editor and cartoonistRob Suggs, who was the subject of a recent post here on the Logos Blog.

In the second article, a Logos user offers tips on how he uses Bible software in the task of exegesis—including the 12-step pattern he follows when preparing a sermon. As we hinted in a another recent blog post, Logos Bible Software will soon include a built-in tool to help structure your Bible study workflow using a variety of study methodologies.

Without further ado, here are leads for the two CCMag articles.

Special Feature – Bible Software’s Best Kept Secret, Libronix Book Builder

by Rob Suggs

It happened sometime in the late nineties. As a Christian magazine editor, I attended a training session for a Bible study software program called Logos. Morris Proctor, our teacher, demonstrated the many pleasures of the Word Made Electronic. The only problem was that, as a publishing firm, we had an office full of Apple equipment, and Logos for the Mac was still on the drawing board.

Read the entire article… (PDF )

Doing Good Digital Exegesis

Higher Power with Kevin

by Kevin A. Purcell

In the book and paper world, biblical exegesis is a time consuming, but useful task. Without it, you cannot faithfully preach the Word of God. A computer and Bible Study software will help you do high-quality, biblical exegesis in far less time than it would using stacks of books and a legal pad. And your study will be more advanced as you utilize powerful original language tools, even if you don’t know Greek or Hebrew.

Read the entire article… (PDF )

Active Bible Reference Visual Filter

In a post awhile back, I mentioned something called the Active Bible Reference visual filter.
This is one of those things best seen. So I made a video to show how it works. Check it out.

Charles Simeon Around the World…Wide Web

We’ve been amazed at the response generated by the prepublication announcement of Charles Simeon’s Horae Homileticae 21-volume commentary series.

Based on the number of people who have blogged about this announcement, there’s clearly a strongfollowing for the writings of this Anglican clergyman. No doubt John Piper’s recent endorsement has also been instrumental in reviving interest in Simeon’s works.

Here’s a sampling of the buzz surrounding the Simeon prepub:

  • Justin Taylor at Between Two Worlds drew attention to Simeon’s three-pronged test which he applied to every sermon: (1) Does it humble the sinner? (2) Does it exalt the Saviour? (3) Does it promote holiness?
  • Phil Johnson at TeamPyropoints out that C.H. Spurgeon read and quoted Charles Simeon. Phil also recommends pre-ordering Simeon’s commentary over spending money on Pyro swag, which is high praise, indeed.
  • In a post from 2006, Mark Lauterbach of GospelDrivenLifesuggests that a particular conversation betweenCharles Simeon (a moderate Calvinist) and John Wesley (a moderate Arminian) could teach today’s Christian bloggers a thing or two about how to conduct doctrinal discussions. This story is also recounted at the Pyromaniacs blog.
  • Adrian Warnock, blogger extraordinaire,gave us the original tipabout the eBay auction of Simeon’s commentary set and encouraged us to offer it as a prepublication. Read the post the started it all, Adrian’s further reflections on Simeon, and his reprint of the Logos NewsWire email that introduced Simeon to many Logos customers for the first time.

If you haven’t already done so…check out the description of this commentary set, sample some page scans, and place your pre-order to take advantage of the hefty prepublication discount!

Same Note in Different Books

As you may already know, the Morris Proctor Tips & Tricks Blogoffers two new tips every week for getting the most out of Logos Bible Software (learn more).

User David Bergquist posed the following question on a recent post at the Tips blog:

Is there a way to have one note show up in two places, for instance at a Bible verse and also in another book? I know one could make two copies of the same note, but is there a way to avoid making duplicate notes to have it show up in different books?

Here’s my response, with the addition of a couple of illustrative screenshots:

David, you can create a system-wide note that’s attached to a Bible verse. Then your note will show up in any book organized by Bible verse (e.g., Bibles and commentaries)!

To do this, right-click in a Bible or commentary and choose Add a Note | [desired note file] | Add a Note to [verse].

Voila! Now when you’re reading any Bible version, commentary, or other book organized by verse (e.g., The New Manners and Customs of the Bible)you can just click the yellow note icon to open and edit the note. Or hover the mouse over the note icon to preview your note right where you are.

Want Help Cleaning Your Desk?


I hope everyone took advantage of National Clean Off Your Desk Day last month…I did not.

But the last few times I cleaned my computer desk at home (which happens precisely as often as we’re expecting overnight guests, since the computer is in the guest room) I noticed a particular kind of detritus that accumulated around and under my monitor and keyboard. I’m not talking about dust (which was also plentiful) but note scraps.

That’s right, little bits of paper with important stuff written on them. Like the username and password for the website I built for my brother-in-law last year. Or the name of a book I heard about on NPR during my drive home one day, scribbled on the corner of a napkin, and deposited near the computer “for later”. Or library card numbers (which the library website unhelpfully refuses to store on my behalf, forcing me to re-enter them every time my kids’ Sesame Street videos need to be renewed).

So when I heard about a simple note-taking application being cooked up by Bob Pritchett, members of the Logos development team, and our graphic artist…I got pretty excited about its potential to help me get (at least slightly) more organized.

NoteScraps: Simple. Elegant. Cheap.

This new application is called NoteScraps and it’s the ideal place tostore bits and scraps of information. The stuff you might write on a post-it note and stick to your monitor…or keyboard…or litter around your desk. The notes that you might not need right now but are pretty sure you’ll need later…long after you forgot where you put them.

There are other note-taking programs out there butNoteScraps is cool because of its simplicity. It sets out to do one thing only and do it well.

  • Taking notes is quick and easy: my phone rings, a quick keystroke opens a new note, and I can start typing as my caller talks.
  • Finding notes is instantaneous: another keystroke (or click in my system tray) brings me to the find box, I start typing a word, and the appbrings forwardnotes that contain the word.
  • Using the app is fun: the design is thoughtful and balanced, and there’s just enough eye candy to enhance the experience by shuffling my notes on the screen as I interact with them.

NoteScraps is designed for Windows Vista but we also offer a version for Windows XP. Be sure to check out the demo video and download your own copy—the trial version is free!

Appendix: What Does NoteScraps Have to Do With Logos Bible Software?

In the words of Bob Pritchett, “Nothing specific — but we’ve all got little notes to manage.” And as he elaborated in our beta newsgroup, “NoteScraps has also served an important role in helping us explore and master the next generation technologies. Before we try to use .NET 3 and WPF in Logos Bible Software we want to play with them in a smaller sandbox.”

Logos/SBL Paper Awards: Just 10 Weeks Left…

Way back in late September, we announced that Logos Bible Software was partnering with the Society of Biblical Literature to give away nearly $18,000 inawards for papers that use the syntax tools in Logos 3 to advance biblical scholarship.

The May 1 contest deadline is drawing near so consider this an encouragement, an exhortation, a friendly nudge to get your paper done and submitted.

Full contest details are at the SBL site.

Need some inspiration for things to write about? Try trollingthe dozens of past posts on syntax here at the Logos Blog.You may also want to spend some time with the syntax videos we’ve posted at Logos.com.

Some of the videos hosted on that page are from a CD-ROM we put together for the ETS/SBL annual meetings in November. Now that entire disccontaining 33 Syntax Demonstrations can be ordered for a nominal fee from Logos.com.

So polish up (or begin writing) your paper and send it in! We look forward to all the great new research that will be produced as part of this contest!