Getting the Most out of Your New Collection

So you’ve owned Scholar’s Library for a little while and have recently added a new collection. Perhaps you just purchased the massive Biblical Counseling Library (30 Volumes). Now you’re wondering how you can put it to good use.
The first step is to create a collection (Tools > Define Collections > New). For further help, see this video demonstration. To save you the time, I’ve already done the work for you. Download the file, and put it in C:\Documents and Settings\ . . . \My Documents\Libronix DLS\Collections.
With your collection file created, you can now start using your new books to their fullest potential. Here are five ways to get the most out of your new collection:
1. Familiarize yourself with your new books. Open My Library (Ctrl+L), and select Biblical Counseling from the Collection drop down. You will see the 30 books that came with your collection. Arrange the books by title or author, and “thumb through” them to get familiar with their contents. If you don’t know what you have, you probably won’t use them very often.

2. Use your new books in the Passage Guide. If you’re working on a sermon on Galatians 6:1, you might want to find out what your counseling books have to say. Since these books aren’t commentaries, they won’t automatically be implemented into the Passage Guide. But getting them to show up there is very easy. Open the Passage Guide, and select Properties. Toward the bottom, there is a Collections section. Check the box next to it and the box next to your Biblical Counseling collection.

Your report will now display hits for your passage.

3. Find a passage of Scripture. If you want to find a passage only in your new collection and not elsewhere in your library, you may want to use the Reference Browser instead of the Passage Guide. Open the Reference Browser (Ctrl+R), select Biblical Counseling from the drop down, set the Type to Bible, enter Gal 6:1 or another passage, choose how specific you want your search to be, and click search.

4. Find a topic. Open the Topic Browser (Ctrl+T), select Biblical Counseling from the drop down, and type a topic like bitterness into the Find box. Click on Bitterness, and immediately you get several relevant hits to explore.

5. Find a word or phrase. You can also search your new collection for a specific word or phrase. Open the basic search (Ctrl+Shift+S), select Biblical Counseling from the drop down, and search for something like manic-depress* (the asterisk includes depressive and depression).


By using these five tips, you’ll be getting the most out of your new resources in no time!

Luther’s Works — Now That’s a Deal!

We’ve talked about the concept of publishing one’s “life’s work” electronically on the blog before (here and here). But the concept isn’t new; some of these “life work” sets have even been published in print already.
If you’ve been around Biblical studies for any portion of time, you have likely heard of many of the big names of the protestant reformation — Luther, Calvin, Zwingli and the like. Did you know that the 55 volume set of Luther’s Works, translated from German into English and edited by Jaroslav Pelikan, has been available in Logos Bible Software format for over five years? And that, at least of the writing of this blog post, the price is only $199.95? (so, less than $5 a volume?!) A price of $199.95 is a pretty good value, even if you’re only interested in the commentary portion of the set.
I occasionally browse the products section of the Logos web site to remind myself of the cool things we’ve done, and I’d forgotten about Luther’s Works. I remember when we did the work on it. The books take up at least three shelves of a standard sized bookshelf. The first 30 volumes are volumes of commentary; the next 24 volumes are topical writings (including vol. 54, the always entertaining and sometimes rather earthy “Table Talk”), and the last volume is a massive index.
If you’re looking for some resources to compliment the books you already have and use in Logos Bible Software format, then maybe you should look into Luther’s Works and see if it floats your boat. Check out the volume list on this baby:

  • Volume 1: Lectures on Genesis — Chapters 1-5
  • Volume 2: Lectures on Genesis — Chapters 6-14
  • Volume 3: Lectures on Genesis — Chapters 15-20
  • Volume 4: Lectures on Genesis — Chapters 21-25
  • Volume 5: Lectures on Genesis — Chapters 26-30
  • Volume 6: Lectures on Genesis — Chapters 31-37
  • Volume 7: Lectures on Genesis — Chapters 38-44
  • Volume 8: Lectures on Genesis — Chapters 45-50
  • Volume 9 Lectures on Deuteronomy
  • Volume 10: First Lectures on the Psalms — 1-75
  • Volume 11: First Lectures on the Psalms — 76-126
  • Volume 12: Selected Psalms I
  • Volume 13: Selected Psalms II
  • Volume 14: Selected Psalms III
  • Volume 15: Ecclesiastes, Song of Solomon, Last Words of David, 2 Samuel 23:1-7
  • Volume 16: Lectures on Isaiah — Chapters 1-39
  • Volume 17: Lectures on Isaiah — Chapters 40-66
  • Volume 18: Minor Prophets I: Hosea-Malachi
  • Volume 19: Minor Prophets II: Jonah and Habakkuk
  • Volume 20: Minor Prophets III: Zechariah
  • Volume 21: The Sermon on the Mount and the Magnificat
  • Volume 22: Sermons on the Gospel of St. John — Chapters 1-4
  • Volume 23: Sermons on the Gospel of St. John — Chapters 6-8
  • Volume 24: Sermons on the Gospel of St. John — Chapters 14-16
  • Volume 25: Lectures on Romans
  • Volume 26: Lectures on Galatians, 1535, Chapters 1-4
  • Volume 27: Lectures on Galatians, 1535, Chapters 5-6; 1519, Chapters 1-6
  • Volume 28: 1 Corinthians 7, 1 Corinthians 15, Lectures on 1 Timothy
  • Volume 29: Lectures on Titus, Philemon, and Hebrews
  • Volume 30: The Catholic Epistles
  • Volume 31: Career of the Reformer I
  • Volume 32: Career of the Reformer II
  • Volume 33: Career of the Reformer III
  • Volume 34: Career of the Reformer IV
  • Volume 35: Word and Sacrament I
  • Volume 36: Word and Sacrament II
  • Volume 37: Word and Sacrament III
  • Volume 38: Word and Sacrament IV
  • Volume 39: Church and Ministry I
  • Volume 40: Church and Ministry II
  • Volume 41: Church and Ministry III
  • Volume 42: Devotional Writings I
  • Volume 43: Devotional Writings II
  • Volume 44: The Christian in Society I
  • Volume 45: The Christian in Society II
  • Volume 46: The Christian in Society III
  • Volume 47: The Christian in Society IV
  • Volume 48: Letters I
  • Volume 49: Letters II
  • Volume 50: Letters III
  • Volume 51: Sermons I
  • Volume 52: Sermons II
  • Volume 53: Liturgy and Hymns
  • Volume 54: Table Talk
  • Volume 55: Index

Two New Pre-Pubs for Theologians

One of the great things about Logos is that it is an incredibly versatile tool. Whether you are doing careful research in Hebrew and Greek, studying the cultures of biblical times, grappling with the meaning of a passage of Scripture, researching an event in church history, sharpening your pastoral or counseling skills, or wrestling with deep theology, Logos equips you with scores of excellent resources.
Those of you with an interest in theology will definitely want to check out these two recent Pre-Pubs:

Norman L. Geisler’s Systematic Theology (4 volumes)

  • Volume One—Part One: Introduction; Part Two: Bible
  • Volume Two—Part One: God; Part Two: Creation
  • Volume Three—Part One: Sin; Part Two: Salvation
  • Volume Four—Part One: Church; Part Two: Last Things

This massive set is Geisler’s magnum opus. Anyone doing serious study in theology will want to consult this important work.
The Collected Works of John M. Frame, Vol. 1: Theology
Here are all of the great resources you will get:

  • The Doctrine of the Knowledge of God
  • The Doctrine of God
  • Salvation Belongs to the Lord
  • No Other God
  • The Amsterdam Philosophy
  • Perspectives on the Word of God
  • 16 Journal Articles
  • 9 Articles That Have Appeared in Books
  • 9 Articles Written for Dictionaries
  • 2 Pamphlets
  • 12 Lecture Outlines
  • 3 Study Guides
  • 4 Syllabi
  • 9 Sermon Manuscripts
  • 17 Short Articles
  • Over 70 Hours of Lecture Audio

John Frame is a profound philosopher, apologist, and theologian. His writings should not be missed. I’ve read several of his books and articles and have profited immensely from them. I can’t wait to add this collection to my Libronix library.
I encourage you to add both of these titles to your Christmas wish list.
Here are several other important theological works you also won’t want to be without:

Changing Your Font Size

A blogger lamented recently that none of the Bible software programs that he has used allow the font size to be enlarged enough so that it is readable when projected on a big screen.
We were happy to inform him that Logos works very well on a screen. A user can easily change the zoom up to 400% (= 48 pts.)—and with a simple script code all the way up to 999% (= 120 pts.)!
The default zoom for resources and reports is 100%, which is equivalent to a 12 pt. font. That may be too small depending on the size and resolution of your monitor—and depending on your purpose. Changing it is a cinch.
There are a couple of ways you can adjust your font size.

  1. All Resources: You can set all resources to use a certain zoom. Do this by going to Tools > Options > General > Text Display and selecting anywhere from 50% to 400% under the Default Zoom drop down. You probably want to leave the box checked next to Use Default Zoom Only with Resources, but test it for yourself to see what you like. You can also change the reports separately. (I have my default zoom set to 150% most of the time, but Bible Speed Search set to 125%.)
  2. Individual Resources and Reports: You can also adjust the zoom on individual resources and reports by using the Zoom icon in the toolbar or by going to View > Zoom. I recommend doing this only after you have set your default zoom. (If you want to change these later, you’ll have to do so one resource at a time! I learned that the hard way as a new user.)

Here are two other tips that some users might find helpful.
What if you want to set your default zoom to something other than what is available in the options (e.g., 135% or 500%)? With a simple script code, you can get as precise as you want.
In the following script code, replace 135 with whatever two or three digit number you want. Create a new toolbar button using the Run Script Code command. Click the button to execute the script.
Here’s the script code:
Application.UserPreferences(“LDLS/ResourceSettings”).SetValue(“Strings”,”Zoom”,”135″);
Another thing you can do is create a button that will toggle between your default zoom and another zoom. This comes in very handy if you prefer one size for a resource when it’s in a smaller window and another size when it’s maximized for reading or displaying on a screen.
To do this, create a toolbar button using the Run Script Code command and this script:
var objWindow = Application.ActiveWindow;
if ( objWindow != null )
{
if ( objWindow.Type == “resource” )
{
var objView = objWindow.View;
if ( objView && objView.IsOpen() )
{
var objDisplayPane = objView.Panes(“display”);
if ( objDisplayPane )
{
var strZoom = objDisplayPane.Control.Zoom;
if ( strZoom != “175%” )
strZoom = “175%”;
else
strZoom = “auto”;
objDisplayPane.Control.Zoom = strZoom;
}
}
}
}

Replace the 175 with whatever two or three digit number you’d like. You can create multiple buttons to use for different purposes.

Keyboard Shortcuts

A great way to become more efficient in Libronix is by using keyboard shortcuts. We’ve compiled a nearly exhaustive list of keyboard shortcuts to help you learn them. Here are a few:

  • Ctrl+L opens My Library.
  • Ctrl+Shift+G activates the Quick Navigation Bar.
  • Tab or Ctrl+G activates the text box in a resource, which you can use to jump to a reference or page.
  • Ctrl+Shift+W closes all windows.
  • Ctrl+F4 or Ctrl+W closes the active window.
  • Ctrl+Shift+C opens the contents pane.
  • The right arrow key takes you to the next resource in a resource association. Try it when you have an English Bible opened.

The best way to make these shortcuts a part of your normal use of Libronix is to go through the list and try each one. Pick a handful that you find especially helpful and start using them immediately.
In addition to the standard shortcuts, you can also create your own shortcuts for many of your favorite activities like opening a resource and applying a visual markup. Here are some examples of things I do with shortcut keys:

  • Alt+A opens my Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary.
  • Alt+D opens my default English dictionary.
  • Alt+T opens my Thesaurus.
  • Alt+E opens the ESV.
  • Alt+G opens my Greek New Testament.
  • Alt+H opens my Hebrew Old Testament.
  • Alt+N opens the New American Commentary to the passage I’m working on (if applicable).
  • Alt+W opens the Word Biblical Commentary to the passage I’m working on (if applicable).
  • Alt+B applies my blue highlighter.
  • Alt+R applies my red highlighter.
  • Alt+Y applies my yellow highlighter.
  • Alt+Z erases my highlighting or other markups.

You can assign keyboard shortcuts like these by creating a custom toolbar. I’ll get you started by showing you how to create shortcuts to open resources.

  1. Open Libronix.
  2. Right click on the toolbar area and click on Customize.
  3. Click New to create a new toolbar.
  4. Leave the Category as Special, and click on Open (Resource).
  5. Click Add, give it a name like Shortcuts, and then click on Details.
  6. Give it a name like ESV, select a style and icon, and assign a shortcut key (e.g., Alt+E).
  7. Click Change and select the resource you would like to open with your shortcut.
  8. Click OK, OK, and Close.
  9. Repeat this process to add other resources.

Feel free to hide your new toolbar by right clicking in the toolbar area and unchecking it. It doesn’t need to be visible to be active.
Here’s a brief video walking you through the steps.
Give it a try!
For other tips on being more efficient, check out our previous post on Mouse Gestures.

Changing Your English Font

Users often ask if there is a way to change the English font in Libronix. The default font is Times New Roman. If you’re like me, you have another font that you prefer. While it’s not a standard option, it is fairly easy to change your English font.
Here are the steps you will need to take:

  1. Open Libronix.
  2. Right click on the toolbar area and click on Customize.
  3. Click New to create a new toolbar.
  4. Leave the Category as Special, and click on Run Script Code.
  5. Click Add, give it a name like Change Font, and then click on Details.
  6. If you want, give it a name, select a style and icon, and assign a shortcut key.
  7. Paste the following Script Code into the box.
  8. var strFont=Application.UserPreferences(“LDLS/ResourceSettings”).GetValue(“Strings”,”Serif”);
    var strFontFamily=Application.UserPreferences(“LDLS/ResourceSettings”).GetValue(“Strings”,”StandardFontFamily”);
    strFont=”Minion Pro”;
    strFontFamily=”Serif”;
    Application.UserPreferences(“LDLS/ResourceSettings”).SetValue(“Strings”,”Serif”,strFont);
    Application.UserPreferences(“LDLS/ResourceSettings”).SetValue(“Strings”,”StandardFontFamily”,strFontFamily);

  9. Replace Minion Pro with the name of your favorite font. Be sure to use the exact name, which you can find in a program like Word.
  10. Click OK, OK, and Close.
  11. Click your new button (or use your shortcut key) to execute the script code.

That’s it. Your new font should now display. To change your font back, just edit your script code and insert Times New Roman. Create as many buttons on your new toolbar as you’d like. I choose to hide my toolbar after executing the script so that it’s not taking up toolbar space.
One caution: not all English fonts support the full range of characters used in Libronix. If you see boxes or other weird shapes, you’ve probably picked a font that’s lacking some necessary characters.
Here’s a brief video walking you through the 10 steps.
Note: you may need to view this post on a separate page to get all of the script code. Click the 06:00 AM below to do so.

Thanksgiving in the Bible Word Study Report

Since it’s Thanksgiving Day here in the U.S., I thought I’d do a little analysis of the primary thanksgiving word in Greek New Testament, the verb εὐχαριστέω, which means “thank, gives thanks to.” I’m primarily interested in getting an overview of the biblical data rather than reading what others have to say about it in lexicons and theological dictionaries (which is very valuable, but not my interest for now). So I open the Bible Word Study report, type in εὐχαριστέω, and let it do its thing.
If your Greek knowledge is limited but you want to run the report based on the Greek text rather than the English, Logos Bible Software makes that easy with the reverse interlinears. Start with the Bible Speed Search, select the ESV (or NRSV) English-Greek Reverse Interlinear New Testament from the drop down box, and type thank in the search box. You’ll get 56 hits in 53 verses. Click the reference for Matt 15:36, the second one in the list. It will open the text of the ESV NT Reverse Interlinear to the proper location. Locate the word thanks, right click it, and select Bible Word Study: “ευχαριστεω” from the list of options.
Once the report finishes, we’re given a wealth of data to examine. My interest for now is in the Grammatical Relationships section, where I can quickly find answers to questions like:

  1. Who gives thanks?
  2. Who receives thanks?
  3. What is thanks given for?

This section is incredibly helpful for quickly getting the big picture of a theme in the NT. As I look over the data, I immediately notice some noteworthy patterns in the Complements section, particularly some things that stand out to me because of my current study of the Trinity.


Of the 23 complements or objects of the verb (i.e., who is being thanked), they are nearly all God. The only human objects are Prisca and Aquila (Rom 16:3). The rest of the references are God—and arguably, God the Father. (Jesus is the object one time [Lk 17:16].) I realize that God can refer to the Triune God, but the contexts and general pattern suggest that the Father is in view.
Here are the data:
Thanks is given to
  • the Father (Col 1:11-12; cf. Jn 11:41)
  • God the Father through Jesus (Rom 1:8; Col 3:17)
  • God, the Father of our Lord Jesus Christ (Col 1:3-5)
  • God the Father in the name of our Lord Jesus Christ (Eph 5:20)
  • God [who is distinguished in the context from Christ] (Rom 14:6; 1 Cor 1:4, 14; Phil 1:3-6; 1 Thes 2:13; 2 Thes 1:3; 2:13; Phm 4-5; Rev 11:17?; cf. Lk 18:11)
  • God [who is later identified as the Father] (1 Thes 1:2-4)
  • God [undefined in the immediate context] (Acts 27:35; 28:15; 1 Cor 14:18)

So what significance does this have as we give thanks to God today (or any day)? It gives us guidance on how we are to think about and interact with our Triune God. These patterns are descriptive, and not necessarily prescriptive of whom we shouldn’t give thanks to. (The fact that we don’t find numerous references about giving thanks to Jesus or the Spirit doesn’t necessarily mean it is inappropriate to do so.) Nevertheless, these data must be the starting point for any biblical theology of giving thanks to God.
Perhaps a more devotional exercise is to reflect upon the Adjuncts section, where we find out that thanks is given

  • always (1 Cor 1:4; Eph 5:20; 1 Thes 1:2-4; 1 Thes 1:3; 2 Thes 2:13; Phm 4-5)
  • for other believers (1 Cor 1:4; 1 Thes 1:2-4; 2 Thes 1:3; 2:13)
    • because God has given grace to them (1 Cor 1:4)
    • because they are growing in faith and love (Rom 1:8; 2 Thes 1:3)
    • because God has chose them (1 Thes 1:2-4; 2 Thes 2:13)

There’s much more to explore here. Run the Bible Word Study report, and have a look for yourself. Let some of these biblical themes be the starting point for your thanksgiving today—and every day.

Reflections on Logos Books and Print Books After Moving

My recent move across the country has given me occasion to reflect again on some of the reasons that I strongly prefer Logos books to print books. On many occasions over the last several weeks, I have had feelings of strong dislike toward print books—like when I was

  • spending hours and hours looking for boxes
  • spending even more hours packing those boxes (packing books properly takes a lot of time)
  • moving those heavy boxes around the house to get them out of the way
  • calculating how much it was going to cost to move them 2,900 miles
  • loading the truck to move out here (though I was glad to have the help of several friends, who were, by the way, not very fond of my print books either!)
  • unloading all of those boxes (without the help of my friends!) up to our second floor condo
  • spending hundreds of dollars on seven new bookshelves
  • spending hours putting those bookshelves together.

My hard feelings toward print books linger, as I

  • continue unpacking all 40 of those boxes
  • anticipate organizing and shelving all 1500 or so of those books
  • think of ever moving them again
  • reflect on how all of my books in my Libronix library were so easy to pack up, move, and unpack; how much money they saved me; and how easy and efficient they are to organize and use!

I guess I can be thankful that the other 3,500+ books in my library are Logos books rather than print books!

This move has just further confirmed for me what I was already convinced of: the incredible value and superiority of my Libronix library to my print library. The way I look at it, print books are something I must have and continue to use only until Logos releases them. I’m thrilled that Logos is doing so at an ever increasing rate—now with more than 8,000 resources available!

I’ve only scratched the surface of the superiority of Logos books to print books. For more, see these previous posts:

Create a Logos Wish List

With Christmas right around the corner, you’re probably already getting asked by family and friends for gift ideas. Why not create a wish list of the Logos products that you’ve been wanting to add to your library? If you’re like me, you’d prefer new resources from Logos over, well, just about anything else.
There are several sites that allow you to create a wish list and send it to your family and friends. Two you might want to consider are Google’s Wish List and Kaboodle.
Google’s Wish List
Google’s wish list is basic and easy to set up. Start by setting up an account. Then go to Logos.com and find your favorite products (e.g., Scholar’s Library: Gold – Logos Bible Software). You’ll also want to have a separate window or tab opened to http://www.google.com/products. Copy and paste the exact product title into Google Products and search. Then click “Add to Shopping List.”

To add it to your wish list, check the “In Wish List” box. Add any notes like priority, etc. Repeat this process for your other wish list items. When you’re ready to share your wish list, click on “My Wish List” in the left hand column.

Drop that link in an email, and all your friends and family will be able to see what you want. Here’s an example of a link you’d share: http://froogle.google.com/shoppinglist?a=SWL&id=ae8474ec…44a76fe6ac1.
While it is clean looking and simple, there are a few downsides to using Google’s wish list: (1) you can’t add items to your wish list directly from another website, (2) your wish list link isn’t very memorable (or short!), and (3) those who purchase from your wish list run the risk of duplicating what someone else already purchased for you. (They’ll just have to make it a collaborative effort.)
Kaboodle
Another, more advanced option is Kaboodle. One of my favorite things about Kaboodle is that it allows you to add things to your wish list on the fly. So as you’re surfing the Logos website, you can click the “Add to Kaboodle” button, and the product you are looking at is instantly added to your wish list.

The Kaboodle plugin is available for Internet Explorer and Firefox.
Here’s an example of a Kaboodle wish list link: http://www.kaboodle.com/philgons/wish-list—much shorter and more memorable than Google’s. Kaboodle also has the advantage of allowing people to reserve items that they have purchased for you, so you won’t receive duplicates.

Kaboodle has more of a cluttered feel to it with ads and such, but in my opinion is the better of the two options.
Have fun creating your own wish list!

Thirteen New Training Videos

Those who frequently visit the Logos training videos webpage may have noticed several tags next to certain links. That’s because John Fallahee of Logos’ Ministry Relations department just added 13 new videos to our ever-expanding collection of free training content.

If you sometimes feel like you aren’t using Logos Bible Software to its full potential, the first thing we would recommend is a visit to www.logos.com/videos. Even if you have been using Logos for years, there may be new features and tools in Logos Bible Software 3 that could help you become more proficient in your Bible study.

One thing I personally enjoy about the training videos is the context they give to the use of a tool. In the same way a trained mathematician uses the proper formulas to solve an equation, using the correct tools in Libronix can greatly expedite your study. You will be able to achieve your desired result more quickly if you know how to use all the tools at your disposal.

Oh, and they’re free, too!

Here are a few of the new videos you’ll find at www.logos.com/videos:

For dozens of training videos (for everyone from new users to Logos veterans) visit www.logos.com/videos.