Moulton-Howard-Turner Greek Grammar Collection Shipping Soon!

If you’ve been to the Pre-Pub page recently, you may have noticed that our featured Pre-Pub is the five-volume Moulton-Howard-Turner Greek Grammar Collection, which is scheduled to ship on 3/17/2008. I’ve been looking forward to this one since it was first announced in June of 2006, so I can’t wait to have these five volumes in my Libronix library.

  • A Grammar of New Testament Greek Vol. 1: Prolegomena
  • A Grammar of New Testament Greek Vol. 2: Accidence and Word-Formation
  • A Grammar of New Testament Greek Vol. 3: Syntax
  • A Grammar of New Testament Greek Vol. 4: Style
  • Grammatical Insights into the New Testament

We used Turner’s volume on syntax in an advanced Greek grammar course in seminary, and I found his meticulous analysis to be incredibly helpful. Grammars make excellent resources to have in your Libronix library. Not only will you be able to instantly check the thousands of biblical examples that the authors cite, but you’ll also be able to jump to other grammatical tools like Robertson’s Grammar, Zerwick’s Biblical Greek, and BDAG to compare and do further study.

Having this set integrated into the Exegetical Guide in Logos will exponentially increase its usability. The Exegetical Guide finds the passage you are studying and gives you all the places where your grammars mention or discuss it. With several solid grammars in your library, you’ll never be short on exegetical gems for your sermons, lectures, papers, and articles.

If you haven’t yet placed your pre-order for this set, there’s still time to get it for the low price of $199.95. CBD sells the four-volume set for $269.99. If you buy ours, you’ll save $70, receive a fifth volume at no extra cost, and get a much more usable collection of resources.

ANET on Pre-Pub!

Customers have asked for Ancient Near Eastern Texts (ANET) for years, and we’re thrilled to announce that it is finally on Pre-Pub.

If you already have The Context of Scripture (COS), you’ll still want to add ANET to your digital library for two reasons. First, while the two volumes have some overlap, both ANET and COS have texts that the other does not have. So you need both if you want access to all of the texts. Second, ANET is much older than COS, which means that most books that reference ancient Near Eastern texts will cite ANET rather than COS. Having ANET makes looking these references up much easier.

Those who recently purchased the new Semitic Inscriptions: Analyzed Texts and English Translations (CD-ROM) will be happy to know that it has scores of links to ANET, allowing you to jump instantly to the various texts.

The Pre-Pub price is currently only $59.95. Amazon sells the print volume for $115. Don’t miss out on this incredible deal!

Can I Get That As a Download, Please?

Today’s guest blogger is Adam Navarrete, one of the new additions to the marketing department at Logos.

In the marketing department, we’re always running reports and looking for ways to provide you with better service. Over the last two weeks, an analysis of our top CD items has provided us with a spectrum of titles to make available for download. What this means is that those of you who have not already added these great collections or individual titles to your library can now do so without having to wait for discs to make their way to you—and you can save a few extra dollars on shipping costs!

The greatest thing about purchasing downloadable resources is that there is no wait time. Whether you are ordering after hours, on the weekend, or when you need a resource for class or to finish your sermon preparation, you get your product as quickly as your internet connection allows.

This becomes a benefit for those of you who have already purchased these items as well. Since the individual book files are now accessible as downloads, you have quick and easy access from the product pages in case your discs become damaged or get lost.

Here is what we have recently made available:

Expect to see more of our top products available for download very soon—along with other cool ways to provide you with even better service.

Get PowerPointSermons in Your Passage Guide!

Logos has teamed up with PowerPointSermons.com to offer you integrated access to a growing library of over 2,000 PowerPoint templates and JPEG images right in the Passage Guide. Finding the perfect PowerPoint for your weekly sermons or worship services is now easier than ever. When you’re doing your sermon preparation in the Passage Guide, you’ll now see attractive PowerPoint templates and images that correspond to your passage.

Clicking on an image takes you right to the PowerPointSermons site, where you can download the template. An annual membership comes with unlimited downloads, so you’ll never be short on professional-looking slides for all of your church needs.

Click the image below to learn more and find out how to sign up for a subscription.

If you’re not a pastor or teacher or just aren’t interested in this service, you can collapse the section and Logos will remember your preferences and keep it collapsed next time your run the Passage Guide. Collapsed sections do not slow down your reports.

The other option is to uncheck it in your Passage Guide properties, which is accessible at the top of the Passage Guide report. Once it is unchecked, it will no longer appear in your report.

For more information, see PowerPointSermons in Your Passage Guide! and How to Disable PowerPointSermons.

Speedier Reports with Just a Few Clicks

The Passage Guide, Exegetical Guide, and Bible Word Study reports provide you with massive amounts of wonderful information that would take you hours to find in print books. But we realize that not every user wants to see everything available—at least not all of the time.

If you find yourself not using some of the sections in any of these reports, you might want to take the time to customize them. Speedier reports are only a few clicks away.

The first option is simply to collapse any section of the report that you want to see only some of the time. A collapsed section doesn’t take any of your system resources, so it won’t slow down your report. Once you run the report, you can decide if you want to see the information in that section and click the plus sign to run it. Logos will remember your preference from the last time you ran the report, so all you need to do is leave the appropriate sections collapsed or expanded when you close it.

If there are sections that you are fairly certainly you will never want to see, you can uncheck them in the report properties, which is located at the top of the report towards the right. Unchecked sections won’t show up at all, making for a more streamlined report with just the information that you want to see.

The time it takes to load your report will be identical whether you simply collapse a section or uncheck it in the properties. You should decide which method to use based on whether you will occasionally or never want to access the data in that section.

The time it takes me to run the full report above (an Exegetical Guide of 1 Cor 15:28) with everything expanded is about 12 seconds. If I collapse or uncheck the Word by Word section, my time is reduced to just under 7 seconds. Five seconds isn’t a lot of time, but it adds up.

You’ll really notice the difference with bigger reports. A BWS report on ἀνήρ with everything expanded takes about 4 minutes and 40 seconds to run. If I collapse the LXX, Philo, and the Apostolic Fathers, my time is cut to about 45 seconds!

Take some time to customize your reports and you’ll be saving time in no time.

How to Find That Missing Gem

Have you ever had trouble locating something that you previously read in one of your Libronix books? Perhaps it’s that perfect quote for the sermon or paper you’re working on—if only you could find it. If you don’t remember which book it was in, you can always check your history to see which books you’ve used recently. After you find the right book, you could then search or use the find bar to locate what you’re looking for—if you remember an exact word or phrase. But what if you remember only the general idea?

I’ve found that often the quickest way to find something in a situation like this is to use the Next button and select Markup.

I remember reading something in Strong’s Systematic Theology. I don’t recall exactly where it was or the precise wording, but I know I highlighted it. So I open Strong’s, switch the Next selection to Markup, click the button a few times, and I am quickly taken to the exact quote I was looking for. Of course, this works only if you are marking up your books when you read. If you’re not, I’d encourage you to do so, even if only for the benefit of using this cool feature. Keep in mind that if your book has hundreds of markups, you’ll at least need to remember the section or chapter to make this efficient. In my case, the quote I was looking for was in chapter two, so finding it was a breeze.

Another really handy use of the Next Markup feature is to get a quick survey of the parts of the book that stood out to you in your first reading. Try this with a chapter in a book, a large article entry, or a section in a commentary to get a quick recap of the most important points.

Give it a try. I think you’ll find it a convenient feature that will soon become a part of your normal use of Libronix.

Two Stories about Jesus and the Public Square

It’s already time for another Logos lecture! The March edition of the Lecture Series features Dr. Darrell Bock of Dallas Theological Seminary. Dr. Bock will be speaking on “Two Stories about Jesus and the Public Square.” The lecture begins at 7:00 PM on Saturday, March 1 at the Mount Baker Theatre in Bellingham, Washington.

The talk will discuss the origins of the alternative Jesus story in our culture. Dr. Bock will also explore the term “Jesusanity” (which for many people in American culture is Christianity). The lecture will conclude with some responses to this type of Christianity and some time for Q&A.
Dr. Bock has earned international recognition as a Humboldt Scholar (Tübingen University in Germany) and for his work in Luke-Acts and in Jesus’ examination before the Jews. He was president of the Evangelical Theological Society (ETS) for 2000–2001, and serves as corresponding editor at large for Christianity Today. His articles appear in leading journals and periodicals, including many secular publications such as the Los Angeles Times and the Dallas Morning News. He has been a New York Times best-selling author in nonfiction, and is elder emeritus at Trinity Fellowship Church in Dallas.
Event Details

  • Date: Saturday, March 1

  • Time: 7:00 PM
  • Location: Mount Baker Theatre in Bellingham, Washington
  • Admission: FREE!

For those who haven’t attended any lectures, these events are free and open to the public. Each talk is designed to be interesting and accessible to a broad audience.

Several of Dr. Bock’s titles are available in Libronix. You’ll definitely want to check them out.

Seeing the Forest and the Trees

For those faint of heart who would prefer to avoid another of my long-winded blog posts, just order this. The rest of you, read on.
When it comes to the Greek New Testament, Logos Bible Software has a great host of tools to help you see the trees. Lexical tags in the various tagged editions of the GNT (including the various interlinears and reverse interlinears) link to lexicons and help you find the range of meanings possible for a given word. Morphological tags in the same texts provide some contextual clues to help determine the meaning and use of the word in the particular instance under study. Learning grammars help students recognize the most common morphological and lexical trees for themselves.
But, while one can learn a lot of useful things by examining the trees, some of the greatest riches of studying the New Testament in Greek come when you can step back and see the forest. That is, at some point the student needs to look at things above the word level. ‘Syntax’ is the term we use for describing how words form into phrases and clauses, and how those structures are used to form sentences. Logos Bible Software has tools for working at the syntax level as well. Reference grammars tend to contain a lot of word- (tree-) level detail on areas like morphology (how words are formed) and phonology (how a language sounds), but they will frequently contain some good information on larger structures like phrases and clauses as well. But few reference grammars approach the Greek New Testament above the level of the sentence. Last year, Logos Bible Software released an edition of the OpenText.org syntax database, which graphs out sentence, clause, and phrase relationships and provides a powerful searching interface for working at the syntactic level. Other syntax databases for the Greek New Testament are also in the works.
There are, however, a growing number of scholars who are looking at much larger units of text than the sentence. The branch of linguistics dedicated to looking at larger blocks of text and analyzing how language is used to convey meaning on a much broader scale is ‘discourse analysis’. (‘Text-linguistics’ is another term sometimes applied to this field.) Recent posts on this blog by Dr. Runge have been giving you a taste of some of the data we’ve been working on to show discourse level features. But I wanted to call your attention to a new collection of books just posted on the prepub page. The Studies in New Testament Greek Collection contains a number of insightful books and essays on the topic of discourse analysis. The books provide some of the theories for how to analyze texts, and then apply the theories so you can see the results. This collection introduces other fields related to discourse analysis, such as ‘rhetorical criticism’ (an examination of how authors use various language elements to persuade or make an argument) and essays on how the cultural context of the New Testament should inform our exegesis. (For example, there are many essays on the topic of how bilingualism in 1st century Palestine should effect how we read the New Testament.)
If you skim the authors and editors of the volumes in this set, you’ll notice several by Stanley Porter (Author of Idioms of the Greek New Testament) and Jeffrey T. Reed (with Stanley Porter, one of the OpenText.org fellows) as well as D.A. Carson (author of Exegetical Fallacies), just to name a few. In addition to discourse and rhetoric, there are many essays in this collection that treat on other intersections between linguistics and biblical studies. This collection serves as an excellent introduction to the value of linguistics for interpreters of scripture.
The preorder price is only $240 for 16 volumes – I paid more than $100 for each of those Greek books in print! I’m very excited about this offer, and hope it generates enough interest to go into production quickly. Order yours today!

Transform Your Site with RefTagger!

One of the benefits of reading books in Libronix is the ease with which you can “look up” Scripture references. Oftentimes in print books they get ignored. It’s simply too much work to flip manually to every passage. But what about Scripture references on the web? There are tens of thousands of Christian blogs and websites with millions—or perhaps even billions—of Scripture references. But we usually face the same problem with Scripture references on the web as we do with print books. They’re just too time consuming to look up. What if you could provide your readers with some of the same conveniences of Libronix on your website? With RefTagger now you can—and without all the time and hard work it takes to create the links manually!

If you have a website or blog, you will definitely want to check it out. It’s a very customizable, free tool that turns all of your Scripture references into hyperlinks to an online Bible. You can even have RefTagger add an icon that is hyperlinked to the passage in Libronix. This gives your readers the opportunity to easily look up the Bible passages that you discuss.

To add RefTagger to your site, all you need to do is paste a few lines of JavaScript code to your template file(s). RefTagger will instantly be applied to all of your site’s content, adding new life to your old blog posts and web pages. When you write a new blog post or upload your latest sermon, it will also instantly have all the added functionality.

If you are a blogger and use WordPress with your own domain name (i.e., not WordPress.com), you can download and install our WordPress plugin and add RefTagger without even having to edit any of your files!

All the details are at the RefTagger page. Head on over to get the code or the plugin and start using it on your site. Once you have it set up, please be sure to let us know by sending an email to reftagger@logos.com. We will put some of the coolest examples on display at the RefTagger page.

If you want to see RefTagger in action, it’s running right here on the Logos blog. Check out these sample posts:

Still Accessing Libronix Resources from Your CDs?

I stumbled across a comment on a forum site recently where a user mentioned that he was accessing his books from his CDs and was frustrated by the speed at which they loaded when scrolling through large portions of text.

I was happy to see that someone quickly let him know that he could copy all of his resources to his hard drive and put his CDs in his closet as a backup.

If you are still accessing your Libronix books from your CDs, read on. With the size of today’s hard drives, most of you will have plenty of room for all of your resource files and should not be using your CDs after the initial installation.

There are at least three benefits to copying your books to your hard drive.

  1. Your computer will be able to access your books much more quickly from your hard drive than you can from your optical drive.
  2. You won’t have to be continually swapping CDs.
  3. You’ll have access to all of your books at once instead of being limited to only the books on a given CD.

To copy your resources to your hard drive, follow these steps:

  1. Insert your CD/DVD into your drive.
  2. Open Libronix.
  3. Click on Tools > Library Management > Location Manager.
  4. Wait until it is done discovering all of the resources that need to be copied.
  5. Click the Copy Resources button.
  6. Repeat steps 4 and 5 until you have copied all of your resource files to your hard drive.

For more help, check out our support article Loading Books and our training video Loading Your Books (2:10, 2.69MB).