The Logos Blog Turns 3!

Three years and 700 posts later . . .

The Logos blog officially launched on July 29, 2005. If my math is correct, that means that today is our 3rd birthday! No need to buy us any presents, but you’re welcome to buy yourself one if you want. :)

Looking Back

Over the past three years we’ve blogged just about every weekday with a few misses here and there. On an interesting note, yesterday’s blog post was our 700th.

As a quick recap, I thought you might enjoy seeing some of the most viewed posts.

According to Google Analytics, here are the 5 posts with the most pageviews:

  1. Try Out the Pre-Pub Program—and Get a Free Book!
  2. The Lifework of Dr. Jim Rosscup
  3. The Secret to Beating the Postage Increase
  4. Free Sermons in Your Bible Software
  5. New Bible Widget for Mac

According to FeedBurner, here are the 5 posts with the most RSS views:

  1. Learn Logos Bible Software
  2. Understanding Data Types: Definitions
  3. Doing Things Faster with the Keyboard, Part 1
  4. Doing Things Faster with the Keyboard, Part 2
  5. Logos in the Blogosphere

Looking Forward

We’re in the process of upgrading the blog from Movable Type 3.2 to 4.2. We hope to roll out a new look with some cool new features very soon, so stay tuned for an even better Logos blog.

We value your input as we move forward. Feel free to share your suggestions for things you’d like to see us incorporate. We’d also love to hear what kinds of posts you find most helpful. What would you like to see us do more of? What could you do without? In short, what can we do to make the blog an ever better tool to keep you informed and help you get the most out of your Bible software? Let us know by leaving a comment or sending an email to blog@logos.com.

Logos at the 60th Annual ETS Meeting

The 60th annual Evangelical Theological Society (ETS) meeting, which is on the subject of Text and Canon, is right around the corner. The event will be held in Providence, Rhode Island on November 19-21, 2008. The tentative schedule is now up at the ETSJETS website. Three people from Logos will be presenting papers.

On Wednesday November 19, Mike Heiser will be moderating the papers on the topic of Israelite Religions in Room 551 B of the Rhode Island Convention Center. At 11:00 AM-11:40 AM he will present “The Concept of a Godhead in Israelite Religion.”

On Thursday Steve Runge and Rick Brannan will present back to back, also in Room 551 B. The theme of the papers is Discourse Grammar and Biblical Exegesis. Steve presents at 10:10 AM-10:50 AM. The title of his paper is “‘I want you to know . . .’ The Exegetical Significance of Meta-comments for Identifying Key Propositions.” At the 11:00 AM-11:40 AM session, Rick will give his paper on “The Discourse Function of αλλα in Non-negative Contexts.”

If you’re planning to attend and any of these papers pique your interest, mark them on your calendar. We’ll also have a booth set up. If you’re there, swing by and say hello. We always love to meet our users.

Oldie But Goodie

The Expositor's Greek Testament (5 Vols.)Sometimes older works get replaced by newer ones and have little enduring value—assuming one has access to the newer works. Others stand the test of time. Such is the case with The Expositor’s Greek Testament (EGT), which was later reprinted and retitled as The Expositor’s Greek New Testament (EGNT), though most still refer to it without the New.

Even though it is more than a century old, many still think it belongs in the libraries of students of Scripture. The Master’s Seminary includes it with an asterisk in their “850 Books for Biblical Expositors.”

World-renown New Testament scholar D. A. Carson, who doesn’t hesitate to say when he thinks that a book has little value, thinks it unfortunate that this set is out of print and maintains that even though dated, “the five volumes of the old Expositor’s Greek New Testament are still worth owning and reading, along with more recent works” (New Testament Commentary Survey, 5th ed., 22, 64).

A search in Libronix for “Expositor’s Greek Testament” OR “Expositor’s Greek New Testament” returns more than 1,600 hits in many Bible and theological dictionaries and encyclopedias, hundreds of the theological journals, and a host of New Testament commentaries.

The EGT, which was edited by William Robertson Nicoll, covers in 3,342 pages the entire New Testament. It features contributions from A. B. Bruce (Synoptic Gospels), Marcus Dods (John and Hebrews), R. J. Knowling (Acts), James Denney (Romans), G. G. Findlay (1 Corinthians), J. H. Bernard (2 Corinthians), Frederic Rendall (Galatians), S. D. F. Salmond (Ephesians), H. A. A. Kennedy (Philippians), A. S. Peake (Colossians), James Moffatt (Thessalonians and Revelation), J. D. White (Timothy and Titus), W. E. Oesterley (Philemon and James), J. H. A. Hart (1 Peter), R. H. Strachan (2 Peter), David Smith (John’s Letters), and J. B. Mayor (Jude).

Place your pre-order to help this oldie but goodie make it back into the libraries of biblical expositors.

You may also want to check out The Expositor’s Bible, also edited by William Robertson Nicoll.

The Gospel of Thomas in Early Christianity

Today’s blog post was written by Kirk Fengel, the newly appointed facilitator of the Logos Lecture Series.

Our next Logos Lecture Series event will feature Dr. Nicholas Perrin of Wheaton College, who will be speaking on “The Gospel of Thomas in Early Christianity.” Make a point of joining us at 7:00 PM on Friday, July 25, at The American Museum of Radio and Electricity here in Bellingham, Washington.

About the Lecture

If the fairly recent buzz over The Da Vinci Code is any indication, it appears that gnostic thought continues to hold a certain fascination in western culture. One of the most important early (so-called) gnostic texts, the Gospel of Thomas, has also attracted its own fair share of popular and scholarly attention, repeatedly prompting the question as to whether this gospel gives us undiscovered words of Jesus. This lecture will deal both with the scholarly controversy and the speaker’s original research on the significance of the Gospel of Thomas within early Christianity.

About the Speaker

Dr. Nicholas Perrin is the author of such fine books as Thomas: The Other Gospel, The Judas Gospel, and Questioning Q, among others, and has also authored many definitive papers and articles. He has extensively researched the Gospel of Thomas, historical Jesus, Paul and Jewish self-definition, and the Gospels. Dr. Perrin holds a Ph.D. from Marquette University, M.Div. from Covenant Theological Seminary, and B.A. from Johns Hopkins University and now serves as Assistant Professor of New Testament at Wheaton College.

Event Details

  • Title: “The Gospel of Thomas in Early Christianity”
  • Speaker: Dr. Nicholas Perrin of Wheaton College
  • Date: Friday, July 25
  • Time: 7:00-8:00 PM
  • Location: The American Museum of Radio and Electricity in Bellingham, Washington.

For those who are unable to attend the lecture we should have the audio available within a few days of the event. Please check the Lecture Series page for updates.

Bible Study Magazine for $2.95

We have several subscription options available for Bible Study Magazine. A one-year subscription is available for pre-order for only $14.95. If you want to order multiple copies of each issue to share with your family, friends, colleagues, study group, etc., you can purchase in quantities of 5, 25, or 100 at substantial discounts.

For those of you who have been hesitant to pre-order an entire year’s worth of issues, we’ve added the option to buy one copy of the first issue only for a mere $2.95. That’s 40% off the list price and covers the cost of shipping to addresses in the continental US (additional charges apply for other addresses). This will give you a chance to check it out without committing to a full year.

If you like what you see—and we’re confident that you will—you’ll be able to subscribe for a full year for $24.95. Of course, if you order the one-year subscription now, you’ll be able to get the Pre-Pub price of $14.95.

Amplified Bible Now Available for Download

Users have asked often about the Amplified Bible, but we’ve never been able to offer it as an individual download—until now. As of last Friday, you can purchase the Amplified Bible as a standalone product.

For those of you not familiar with the Amplified Bible, it’s distinguishing feature is how it gives alternate ways to translate words and phrase and explanatory notes right in the text in parentheses and brackets.

Compare 1 John 1:9 in the Amplified Bible to the ESV:

ESV

If we confess our sins, he is faithful and just to forgive us our sins and to cleanse us from all unrighteousness.

Amplified Bible

If we [freely] admit that we have sinned and confess our sins, He is faithful and just (true to His own nature and promises) and will forgive our sins [dismiss our lawlessness] and [continuously] cleanse us from all unrighteousness [everything not in conformity to His will in purpose, thought, and action].

For a limited time, we’re offering a special 50% discount to our blog readers. Use coupon code AMPLIFIED during checkout, and we’ll cut the price in half. The coupon code is valid through July 31, 2008, so don’t miss out.

That’s One Big Commentary on Hebrews

Back in March we announced that the Works of John Owen (17 Vols.) had finally been put on Pre-Pub. As we expected, it’s generated more than enough interest to send it into production. The digitization process is moving along nicely, even though we did have some lacunae in our copy of volume 17. (Volume 17, which is entitled Theologoumena Pantodapa, is an entirely Latin volume that was left out of the Banner of Truth reprint edition. It’s nearly impossible to find even in libraries, but we were finally able to borrow a copy from Westminster Seminary California.)

Though there was much rejoicing when we announced Owen’s 17-volume set, one question came repeatedly, “What about Owen’s massive Hebrews commentary?” Blog post comments, newsgroup postings, and emails all cried out for Owen’s detailed exposition of Hebrews.

I was happy to see the works of John Owen on Pre-Pub but my joy soon turned to disappointment. What happened to Owen’s work on Hebrews (7 volumes)? Would you consider having Owen’s Hebrews in the Logos electronic format even if it is a standalone collection? Surely it can’t be right not having Hebrews to complete the Owen’s collection. Please give due consideration to my request & do all you can to have Owen’s Hebrews in Logos.

. . .

Owen’s 7 vol. commentary on Hebrews is great. I have the books and have found them very useful.  He is exhaustive, approaching the text from many angles.

. . .

Thank you for doing this. I’ve been hoping for Owen for some time. I’m certain that this should be a big hit, and I am excited for Hebrews.

. . .

I am EATING UP all the Puritan materials that have gone Pre-Pub the last few months. I’ve got $1,400 worth of Pre-Pubs right now. Go Logos! Still looking forward to Owen’s Hebrews commentary, and hopefully John Gill’s commentary, more puritan works, etc.

In my original blog post I said, “If there is enough interest in Owen’s works, we’ll eventually put his 7-volume Hebrews commentary up on Pre-Pub as well.”

We’re glad to report that you can now place your pre-order for Owen’s 7-volume, 4,000-page, 2,000,000-word Exposition of the Epistle to the Hebrews.

Learning Greek Just Got a Little Easier

As many Bible college and seminary students (and teachers!) can attest, learning Greek can be a challenging task. “It’s Greek to me!” hasn’t become a well-known expression without good reason.

One of our goals here at Logos is to facilitate learning and using the original languages. We offer a huge number of Hebrew and Greek resources. But as helpful and essential as grammars are for learning Greek, reading books isn’t enough for many students. They need to hear it and speak it to get it to stick.

We introduced our Greek Pronunciation Addin a couple of years ago (a Hebrew Pronunciation Addin is on Pre-Pub). It’s included in Scholar’s, Silver, and Gold and is also available for individual sale. The addin allows students to reinforce standard pronunciations, but only for lemmas (the dictionary form) and only one word at a time.

Learning the proper pronunciation for inflected forms involves a little more guesswork, especially for students learning Greek on their own without the help of an instructor.

With the new Greek Audio Bible, you can now hear Professor John Schwandt read any passage in the Greek New Testament. Simply enter a passage, and click play. The blue arrow will move with the audio to help you follow along in your Greek New Testament. If the normal reading speed is too fast, you can adjust it to slow or slower.

This is sure to be a helpful tool for beginner and intermediate Greek students.

Find out more at the product page, or see it in action in this video demonstration.

Free Downloads, Applications, and More!

We offer several free tools and applications in addition to our Libronix engine and decided that it was time to put them all together in one easy-to-access place.

If you’re relatively new to Logos, you may not know about things like NoteScraps, Shibboleth, Global Bible Reader, RefTagger, our Bible Widget, or the What the Bible Says About website.

Head over to http://www.logos.com/downloads and check them out.

Why a Print Magazine?

I believe in electronic publishing.

For ease of use, searchability, and fast distribution, there’s nothing better than pure data. So why is Logos Bible Software launching Bible Study Magazine as a paper product? To reach even more people with the excitement and encouragement of Bible study.

Paper isn’t dead. And while more and more people are discovering that it’s an awkward format for a ten volume Greek lexicon, it still remains a very attractive, portable, friendly, accessible, and bathroom-compatible format for browsing.

When I use electronic media, I’m on a mission to search and retrieve answers. And it’s great—I get answers quickly. But when I pick up a magazine, I find myself exposed to new information and new ideas. The layout and format draw me into stories I would never have searched for. I use my keyboard to look things up; magazines expand the world of things I want to know about.

The world of Bible study is bigger than looking up verses or doing a word study. Our goal with Bible Study Magazine is to expand your horizons. We want to introduce both the person in the pulpit and in the pew to topics, ideas, and tools for better Bible study.

For searching the writings of the Apostolic Fathers, there’s no better tool than Logos Bible Software. To introduce someone who’s never thought of them to the Fathers and explain how their writings can illuminate our Bible study and encourage us in our faith? That’s a job for Bible Study Magazine.

For the digerati among us who’ve given up on print and read everything from a screen, we’ll eventually have the magazine content available electronically for Logos Bible Software. In the meantime, though, we hope to use the power of print to reach a new and larger audience whose horizons we can expand and whose curiosity we can pique.

I know you are interested in Bible study, and I am confident you’ll find Bible Study Magazine well worth the subscription price. But I think an even better investment is to take a bundle subscription for your church or small group. We all know people who know they should spend more time in the Word, but who haven’t experienced the joy of digging deeper. Bible Study Magazine is designed to engage their interest, to make it easy to get started, and to expose them to the excitement of discovery in and around God’s Word.

We can make it as easy as picking up a magazine.