Greek Syntax: First Thessalonians 4:16, Part II

A few days back, I posted an article about 1Th 4.16, specifically on using syntax searching to find all instances of the prepositional phrase εν Χριστω. And that is helpful, but it isn’t the whole story.

1Th 4.16

Today’s article will build on that previous article. In the previous article, I discussed how one can find instances of prepositional phrases that modify a verb; so, adverbial instances of prepositional phrases. What can be more interesting, particularly when attempting to discern what is going on with a particular prepositional phrase such as occurs in 1Th 4.16, is to do some searching that examines how the prepositional phrase stands in relationship to the syntactic items around it.
So today’s article will use the same basic concept to find instances of εν Χριστω that modify the clausal verb; but we’ll look for where the prepositional phrase precedes the verb; for where it follows the verb, and if it occurs modifying a supplied verb.

prepositional phrase functioning adverbally

Because it is easier to show than document in writing, I’ve created a video that walks through these searches.

Why is this important? Well, in examining 1Th 4.16′s use of εν Χριστω, you’ll notice that there are two strong possibilities for the prepositional phrase. It can either attach to the subject οι νεκροι, or it can attach to the verb αναστησονται. In 1Th 4.16, the verb follows the prepositional phrase. One strategy, then, is to look for analogues (similar instances). Where else does the verb follow the prepositional phrase? And where it does, what else is going on in those verses syntactically?
That won’t give the whole answer; but it may help in getting there. And syntax searching isn’t just searching for words, or collocations of words, or even collocations of words with some morphological data thrown in — it is searching for relationships between words, and for relationships between higher-level syntactic components (such as subjects, predicators, and the like).
In this case, we’ve specified relationships between words to define the structure that represents the prepositional phrase εν Χριστω (which is why syntax searches implicitly locate items like εν γαρ Χριστω even though postpositives are not explicitly accounted for in the search) and we’ve also specified structures that specify relationships between clause components (the predicator and the component containing the prepositional phrase).
We’ve been able to sift our hits with (relatively) little effort and, more importantly, with precision. These different search results, then, can help us walk through like structures, looking for analogues that may shed some light on how to determine whether or not εν Χριστω in 1Th 4.16 is functioning adverbially or adjectivally.

External Linking to Libronix Resources and Reports

A very handy and unfortunately very underused feature in the Libronix Digital Library System is the ability to link to resources from external documents (like Word documents and PDFs) and web pages. This functionality is part of the Power Tools Addin (Tools > Options > Power Tools). If you don’t already have it, you can read about or watch how to download it for free.
Libronix allows for a much better hyperlinking experience than the web does. When you link to a web page, you usually can’t link to a specific location on that page.* For example, if you wanted someone to read a certain portion of Van Til’s “Why I Believe in God” at Reformed.org, you would have to direct him to go to the fourth section, third paragraph, etc. Not horrible, but not ideal.
In Libronix we provide far greater power and specificity in linking. You can link to a variety of different things:
(Note: These links may not work properly in all feed readers. Visit the site to try them out.)

  • Book: like the ESV
  • Page: like page 25 of The Moody Handbook of Theology
  • Topic: like “Trinity” in the New Bible Dictionary or λόγος in BDAG (a little buggy in IE)
  • Verse: like John 1:18 in the Holman Christian Standard Bible
  • Exact Location: like this quote from Charles Hodge’s Systematic Theology

And that’s not all. I just learned, thanks to Sean Boisen’s blog post “Libronix Links As Knowledge Resources,” that you can even link to most reports! So you can take someone directly to—and even run for them—any of these:

How cool is that?! And most of these links will even preserve preferences like version choice, etc. where applicable!
Some of you are already thinking of all the ways you can make use of this. Others of you might still be wondering how this would come in handy. Let me suggest a few ways:

  1. Include links to resources and reports in your digital teaching materials. If you use a computer while you teach, this will save you time by allowing you to look up sources and run reports more quickly giving you more time to spend actually teaching.
  2. Include links to resources and reports in your digital syllabi. Many universities and seminaries are now distributing syllabi as Word documents or PDFs. Having Libronix links in your material will make learning more efficient—and fun!
  3. Include links to resources and reports in your papers. This is helpful if you share your papers with others via your website or some other way digitally. If they use Libronix, they’ll be able to run down your footnotes. But perhaps it will be of most help to you. If you want to look up one of your sources to double check something or recheck the data behind your conclusion, it’s just a click away. My dissertation is full of thousands of hidden Libronix links.
  4. Include links to resources and reports in your blog posts. I regularly link to my Libronix library when blogging (e.g., see the notes section in this post).

So how do you create a link? It’s very simple. Open a resource to the location to which you want to link, click Favorites in the menu bar, then click Copy Location to Clipboard (or just use the keyboard shortcut Alt+Ctrl+C). Create your hyperlink, and you’re all set. It works the same way with most reports.
Here are a couple of articles where you can find more information about external linking to Libronix resources:

One warning about external linking and web browsers: Internet Explorer and Firefox don’t handle Libronix encoding the same way, so you may occasionally run into trouble with more complicated links (e.g., spaces are particularly problematic). A link may work in one browser but not another. In addition, Internet Explorer struggles with Greek and Hebrew, but Firefox tends to handle them properly. You shouldn’t have trouble with the simpler links, and we’re working on ways to get browsers to behave properly with the more complicated ones.
* I say usually because some pages have anchors built into them, which allows you to link to a specific section of the page, but most pages don’t have anchors and most people don’t know how to find anchor text or how to link to it.

Greek Syntax: First Thessalonians 4:16

[NB: The update at the bottom of the article is new; if you've found this article useful please review it. Thanks! — Rick]
The most recent issue of the SBL’s Journal of Biblical Literature (vol 126, no 3) has an article entitled “The Syntax of εν Χριστω in 1 Thessalonians 4:16″ (pp. 579-593). SBL members are able to download the article from the Society of Biblical Literature web site.
The article’s authors, David Konstan and Ilaria Ramelli, examine the question of whether or not the prepositional phrase εν Χριστω (“in Christ”) attaches to the clause subject (οι νεκροι, “the dead”) or to the clause verb (αναστησονται, “will rise”).
Why is this important? Basically the question the authors seek to answer is whether it is more appropriate to translate the clause “the dead in Christ will rise” or “the dead will rise in Christ”; important to the authors as they state:

The choice between the two versions is of considerable importance. On the first interpretation, only those who have died in Christ will be resurrected, whereas the second can be taken to signify that all the dead will be resurrected in Christ—the necessary premise for the thesis of universal salvation or apocatastasis defined by Origen and other patristics writers, including Gregory of Nyssa. (580)

At this point, I think it is worth stating that the way one answers the question may allow for an interpretation of universal salvation, but it surely doesn’t dictate it. I should also note that the authors don’t say that the way one answers the question dictates interpretation; I just thought I should make that clear.
I’m not going to interact directly with the article’s argument; I just thought it would be helpful to use this as a springboard to talk some more about (surprise!) syntax searching. Because examining questions like this really is syntax searching.
The authors of the article locate all instances of the prepositional phrase (there are 84 instances)* and then work through many of them looking to see what light they shed on how the prepositional phrase is attached. Of course, if you’ve used the OpenText.org Syntactically Analyzed Greek New Testament, you know that you can at least get their reading on questions like this. Here is how they organize 1Th 4.16:

1Th 4.16

As you can see, the OpenText.org SAGNT read the prepositional phrase (εν Χριστω, “in Christ”) as modifying the noun phrase, thus “the dead in Christ.”
Next we can search to find all instances of the prepositional phrase εν Χριστω. As you can see, The OpenText.org SAGNT does not specifically mark items as prepositional phrases, but it does have consistent encoding. There are two ways that prepositional phrases are annotated, and it depends on if they are adjectival (modifying a noun) or adverbial (modifying a verb). As can be seen in the above example, when the prepositional phrase is adverbial, one has a modifier that contains a modifier that is a specifier followed by a word that is the prepositional object. This query could be expressed as follows:

εν Χριστω functioning adjectivally

Adverbial instances are different; Romans 9.1 is a good example:

Ro 9.1

Inside of the word group (wg), the head term contains the exact same structure as the modifier in the adjectival version above. This can be expressed in the Syntax Search dialog as follows:

εν Χριστω functioning adverbally

If you combine both searches with an OR, you can get a list of all of the instances of εν Χριστω to follow along and consult as you read the article.

εν Χριστω as prepositional phrase

This essentially gives you a second opinion to check out while you follow the authors’ argument. And for technical arguments like the sort made in this article; that can be helpful.


* The authors’ count is 84; however a syntax search returns 86 hits. There are two verses that have two hits apiece. First is 1Co 4.15, which has εν and Χριστω separated by a postpositive γαρ in the second hit of the verse. The other verse is Php 4.19, which has an ambiguous modification structure (εν δοξη εν Χριστω Ιησου) that causes searches to locate each εν as the basis of the hit. Therefore a Syntax Search provides evidence of 85 instances; as the authors of the article do not provide a comprehensive hit list, there is no way to tell where these lists differ. My guess is that their count is a count of verse instances (84) and not of hits (85), though they do phrase it as if the number 84 reflects instances and not number of verses in which instances are found—a subtle but important difference.
Update (2007-12-07): I’ve revisited my original syntax search and the hit count discrepancy (84 vs 85). I’ve determined that 84 is the proper number. In my original syntax search, I should have done two things differently. First, I should have stated morphological criteria for the lexical form χριστος; or I should have just searched for the inflected text Χριστω. Second, the anything objects were unnecessary. A screen shot of the revised query is below. This query returns 84 instances, and these are likely the same 84 instances cited by Konstan and Ramelli in their article.

Syntax Search for εν Χριστω

Hopefully this clarification helps.

Meet Dave Kaplan

From time to time we like to give you the opportunity to get to know the people here at Logos. Today we want to introduce you to Dave Kaplan. Dave has been with Logos since December of 1993, just four months short of veteran Rick Brannan, who recently celebrated 14 years at Logos. The way Logos takes care of its employees and the great people and work environment are two things that make Dave love working at Logos.
Dave spends most of his time on the phone talking with our wonderful customers. Interacting with so many different people makes his job a joy, but he finds it especially rewarding knowing that he is helping to provide thousands of people with a phenomenal tool that can assist them in their walk with God.
In his spare time, Dave enjoys playing chess, which he describes as “the most personal game ever invented,” and building Popsicle stick houses and burning them down with his son, Gregory (so he can learn how quickly a fire can consume a house). He also loves peppers and usually has a couple in his pocket.
“Kaplanisms”
Dave is perhaps best known by those in the sales department for his unique sayings, affectionately called “Kaplanisms.” Dave has a gift—a lot like Yogi Berra did—of unintentionally modifying well-known expressions, combining them together, or just making up his own!
Here’s an example. One morning Dave came into the office apparently wearing too much cologne, and the other guys were giving him a hard time. Dave responded, “I only put a dab on both of my necks.”
The guys in the sales department have been compiling a list of sayings over the last year or so. We were originally going to share them anonymously, but the guys were able to convince Dave that he might get some good publicity and increase his sales!
So without further ado, here are Dave’s “Kaplanisms”:

  • Talking with a customer whom he couldn’t understand at all: “I’m as deaf as a bat!”
  • “I cannot count the countless evenings I spent talking . . . .”
  • Trying to convince a customer: “Sir, I can assure you that I seriously doubt I can’t make you happy.”
  • “That’s like shootin’ an arrow through a bale of hay and not hittin’ any straw!”
  • Explaining to customers to wait until they get the software before worrying about how to install it: “You’re trying to land an airplane, and we haven’t even gotten into the cockpit yet.”
  • Explaining to customers to close down the software before installing an update: “It’s like changing the spark plugs while the motor is runnin’.”
  • ” . . . as happy as a tornado in a cornfield.”
  • “I walked outside this morning and my woods smelled so woodsy!”
  • “If someone buys you a car, you don’t really own it.”
  • “For once I’m finishing my day with my i’s crossed and my t’s . . . how does that saying go again?”
  • “Let’s get down to logic here.”
  • “I can guarantee you we don’t print like the other guy’s software!”
  • “That’s on Pre-Publication—that’s short for Pre-Pub.”
  • “Yeah, it’s all over. Now I can stop being less paranoid.”
  • “I heard very clearly, in my peripheral vision, someone say . . . .”
  • “Are you ready for this? Let me put it this way . . . . I will say this . . . .”
  • “That’s as messed up as a soup sandwich.”
  • Telling people about his flight to Belgium: “It was a 9 hour drive flying!”

During my interview with Dave, I had the privilege of experiencing a new “Kaplanism” firsthand. Dave explained why he never oversells or undersells, but always directs people to the product that is best suited for them: “I have to sleep with myself at night” (an obvious conflation of “I have to live with myself” and “I have to sleep at night”).
If you know Dave or have dealt with him on the phone, leave him a message in the comments!
If you’d like to work with one of Logos’ best sales employees, you can reach Dave directly at (360) 685-2304.

Pure Life Collection

Living a pure life is becoming increasingly more difficult in today’s secular culture. Sexual temptations are everywhere: TV, the Internet, the grocery store, the workplace. Many Christians—and even many pastors—are not adequately equipped for these challenges. The statistics are frightening. More ministers are falling into sexual sin today than ever before, and many Christian men live in constant defeat. Something needs to change. Pastors and churches must address these issues more openly and consistently—and they need solid resources to do so.
We are very excited to be able to offer this excellent collection of resources geared at helping men battle sexual temptations.
The Pure Life Collection (12 volumes) DVD-ROM contains nearly 2000 pages and 180 minutes from Steve and Kathy Gallagher of Pure Life Ministries—a ministry that has helped thousands recover from and avoid the devastating effects of sexual sin.
Here are the nine books that are included in the collection:

  • Out of the Depths of Sexual Sin by Steve Gallagher | 222 pages | 2003
  • Living in Victory by Steve Gallagher | 233 pages | 2002
  • Create in Me a Clean Heart: Answers for Struggling Women by Steve Gallagher and Kathy Gallagher | 269 pages | 2007
  • When His Secret Sin Breaks Your Heart by Kathy Gallagher | 189 pages | 2003
  • Intoxicated with Babylon by Steve Gallagher | 233 pages | 1996
  • At the Altar of Sexual Idolatry by Steve Gallagher | 304 pages | 2007
  • A Biblical Guide to Counseling the Sexual Addict by Steve Gallagher | 208 pages | 2004
  • Irresistible to God by Steve Gallagher | 170 pages | 2003
  • How America Lost Her Innocence by Steve Gallagher | 96 pages | 2005

Here are the three videos that are included:

  • Breaking Free From Habitual Sin by Steve Gallagher | Approx. 60 minutes
  • Overcoming Insecurity by Steve Gallagher | Approx. 60 minutes
  • The Call to Freedom by Steve Gallagher | Approx. 60 minutes

These solid resources are sure to provide a wealth of material to help men in the battle for sexual purity.
Here are two other important counseling collections that you won’t want to miss:

The Dead Sea Scrolls and the New Testament

On Tuesday, December 4 Dr. Peter Flint of the Dead Sea Scrolls Institute at Trinity Western University will present his lecture “The Dead Sea Scrolls and the New Testament.” This long-awaited lecture will be held at Fraser Hall 4 on the campus of Western Washington University in Bellingham, Washington. The event will begin at 7:00 PM and admission is free.

In this stunning presentation illustrated with PowerPoint pictures, Dr. Flint will introduce the Dead Sea Scrolls, focusing on the biblical scrolls found at Qumran, and discuss the implication of these ancient manuscripts for the Bible. Some of the vital issues raised by the Scrolls are the antiquity, the accuracy, and the canon of the Bible in light of the Dead Sea Scrolls. The lecture will also reveal several new readings from the Dead Sea Scrolls. These readings are so powerful and so important that they are being included in recent English translations of the Bible.

As Dr. Flint will note in his lecture, there have been major advancements in the study of the Dead Sea Scrolls in the past few years. At Logos we’re doing our part to increase the distribution and in-depth study of the scrolls through the upcoming Qumran Biblical Dead Sea Scrolls Database.

About the Speaker

Peter W. Flint received his Ph.D. (1993) in Old Testament and Second Testament Judaism from the University of Notre Dame and is Professor of Religious Studies and Co-Director of the Dead Sea Scrolls Institute at Trinity Western University in British Columbia. He is the author of numerous studies on the Dead Sea Scrolls, including the critically acclaimed The Dead Sea Psalms Scrolls and the Book of Psalms (E. J. Brill, 1997), co-author of the widely-read Dead Sea Scrolls Bible (Harper San Francisco, 1999), and editor of the major two-volume collection The Dead Sea Scrolls After Fifty Years: A Comprehensive Assessment (E. J. Brill, 1998-99).

Parking Information

The lecture will take place in Fraser Hall 4 at Western Washington University. On the WWU campus map you will notice that Fraser Hall is located between Red Square and East College Way. There will be pay parking available along East College Way and free parking is available after 5:00 PM in the large south lot on campus. Please note that the south lot is a 5-10 minute walk to Fraser Hall.

Getting the Most out of Your New Collection

So you’ve owned Scholar’s Library for a little while and have recently added a new collection. Perhaps you just purchased the massive Biblical Counseling Library (30 Volumes). Now you’re wondering how you can put it to good use.
The first step is to create a collection (Tools > Define Collections > New). For further help, see this video demonstration. To save you the time, I’ve already done the work for you. Download the file, and put it in C:\Documents and Settings\ . . . \My Documents\Libronix DLS\Collections.
With your collection file created, you can now start using your new books to their fullest potential. Here are five ways to get the most out of your new collection:
1. Familiarize yourself with your new books. Open My Library (Ctrl+L), and select Biblical Counseling from the Collection drop down. You will see the 30 books that came with your collection. Arrange the books by title or author, and “thumb through” them to get familiar with their contents. If you don’t know what you have, you probably won’t use them very often.

2. Use your new books in the Passage Guide. If you’re working on a sermon on Galatians 6:1, you might want to find out what your counseling books have to say. Since these books aren’t commentaries, they won’t automatically be implemented into the Passage Guide. But getting them to show up there is very easy. Open the Passage Guide, and select Properties. Toward the bottom, there is a Collections section. Check the box next to it and the box next to your Biblical Counseling collection.

Your report will now display hits for your passage.

3. Find a passage of Scripture. If you want to find a passage only in your new collection and not elsewhere in your library, you may want to use the Reference Browser instead of the Passage Guide. Open the Reference Browser (Ctrl+R), select Biblical Counseling from the drop down, set the Type to Bible, enter Gal 6:1 or another passage, choose how specific you want your search to be, and click search.

4. Find a topic. Open the Topic Browser (Ctrl+T), select Biblical Counseling from the drop down, and type a topic like bitterness into the Find box. Click on Bitterness, and immediately you get several relevant hits to explore.

5. Find a word or phrase. You can also search your new collection for a specific word or phrase. Open the basic search (Ctrl+Shift+S), select Biblical Counseling from the drop down, and search for something like manic-depress* (the asterisk includes depressive and depression).


By using these five tips, you’ll be getting the most out of your new resources in no time!

Luther’s Works — Now That’s a Deal!

We’ve talked about the concept of publishing one’s “life’s work” electronically on the blog before (here and here). But the concept isn’t new; some of these “life work” sets have even been published in print already.
If you’ve been around Biblical studies for any portion of time, you have likely heard of many of the big names of the protestant reformation — Luther, Calvin, Zwingli and the like. Did you know that the 55 volume set of Luther’s Works, translated from German into English and edited by Jaroslav Pelikan, has been available in Logos Bible Software format for over five years? And that, at least of the writing of this blog post, the price is only $199.95? (so, less than $5 a volume?!) A price of $199.95 is a pretty good value, even if you’re only interested in the commentary portion of the set.
I occasionally browse the products section of the Logos web site to remind myself of the cool things we’ve done, and I’d forgotten about Luther’s Works. I remember when we did the work on it. The books take up at least three shelves of a standard sized bookshelf. The first 30 volumes are volumes of commentary; the next 24 volumes are topical writings (including vol. 54, the always entertaining and sometimes rather earthy “Table Talk”), and the last volume is a massive index.
If you’re looking for some resources to compliment the books you already have and use in Logos Bible Software format, then maybe you should look into Luther’s Works and see if it floats your boat. Check out the volume list on this baby:

  • Volume 1: Lectures on Genesis — Chapters 1-5
  • Volume 2: Lectures on Genesis — Chapters 6-14
  • Volume 3: Lectures on Genesis — Chapters 15-20
  • Volume 4: Lectures on Genesis — Chapters 21-25
  • Volume 5: Lectures on Genesis — Chapters 26-30
  • Volume 6: Lectures on Genesis — Chapters 31-37
  • Volume 7: Lectures on Genesis — Chapters 38-44
  • Volume 8: Lectures on Genesis — Chapters 45-50
  • Volume 9 Lectures on Deuteronomy
  • Volume 10: First Lectures on the Psalms — 1-75
  • Volume 11: First Lectures on the Psalms — 76-126
  • Volume 12: Selected Psalms I
  • Volume 13: Selected Psalms II
  • Volume 14: Selected Psalms III
  • Volume 15: Ecclesiastes, Song of Solomon, Last Words of David, 2 Samuel 23:1-7
  • Volume 16: Lectures on Isaiah — Chapters 1-39
  • Volume 17: Lectures on Isaiah — Chapters 40-66
  • Volume 18: Minor Prophets I: Hosea-Malachi
  • Volume 19: Minor Prophets II: Jonah and Habakkuk
  • Volume 20: Minor Prophets III: Zechariah
  • Volume 21: The Sermon on the Mount and the Magnificat
  • Volume 22: Sermons on the Gospel of St. John — Chapters 1-4
  • Volume 23: Sermons on the Gospel of St. John — Chapters 6-8
  • Volume 24: Sermons on the Gospel of St. John — Chapters 14-16
  • Volume 25: Lectures on Romans
  • Volume 26: Lectures on Galatians, 1535, Chapters 1-4
  • Volume 27: Lectures on Galatians, 1535, Chapters 5-6; 1519, Chapters 1-6
  • Volume 28: 1 Corinthians 7, 1 Corinthians 15, Lectures on 1 Timothy
  • Volume 29: Lectures on Titus, Philemon, and Hebrews
  • Volume 30: The Catholic Epistles
  • Volume 31: Career of the Reformer I
  • Volume 32: Career of the Reformer II
  • Volume 33: Career of the Reformer III
  • Volume 34: Career of the Reformer IV
  • Volume 35: Word and Sacrament I
  • Volume 36: Word and Sacrament II
  • Volume 37: Word and Sacrament III
  • Volume 38: Word and Sacrament IV
  • Volume 39: Church and Ministry I
  • Volume 40: Church and Ministry II
  • Volume 41: Church and Ministry III
  • Volume 42: Devotional Writings I
  • Volume 43: Devotional Writings II
  • Volume 44: The Christian in Society I
  • Volume 45: The Christian in Society II
  • Volume 46: The Christian in Society III
  • Volume 47: The Christian in Society IV
  • Volume 48: Letters I
  • Volume 49: Letters II
  • Volume 50: Letters III
  • Volume 51: Sermons I
  • Volume 52: Sermons II
  • Volume 53: Liturgy and Hymns
  • Volume 54: Table Talk
  • Volume 55: Index

Two New Pre-Pubs for Theologians

One of the great things about Logos is that it is an incredibly versatile tool. Whether you are doing careful research in Hebrew and Greek, studying the cultures of biblical times, grappling with the meaning of a passage of Scripture, researching an event in church history, sharpening your pastoral or counseling skills, or wrestling with deep theology, Logos equips you with scores of excellent resources.
Those of you with an interest in theology will definitely want to check out these two recent Pre-Pubs:

Norman L. Geisler’s Systematic Theology (4 volumes)

  • Volume One—Part One: Introduction; Part Two: Bible
  • Volume Two—Part One: God; Part Two: Creation
  • Volume Three—Part One: Sin; Part Two: Salvation
  • Volume Four—Part One: Church; Part Two: Last Things

This massive set is Geisler’s magnum opus. Anyone doing serious study in theology will want to consult this important work.
The Collected Works of John M. Frame, Vol. 1: Theology
Here are all of the great resources you will get:

  • The Doctrine of the Knowledge of God
  • The Doctrine of God
  • Salvation Belongs to the Lord
  • No Other God
  • The Amsterdam Philosophy
  • Perspectives on the Word of God
  • 16 Journal Articles
  • 9 Articles That Have Appeared in Books
  • 9 Articles Written for Dictionaries
  • 2 Pamphlets
  • 12 Lecture Outlines
  • 3 Study Guides
  • 4 Syllabi
  • 9 Sermon Manuscripts
  • 17 Short Articles
  • Over 70 Hours of Lecture Audio

John Frame is a profound philosopher, apologist, and theologian. His writings should not be missed. I’ve read several of his books and articles and have profited immensely from them. I can’t wait to add this collection to my Libronix library.
I encourage you to add both of these titles to your Christmas wish list.
Here are several other important theological works you also won’t want to be without:

Changing Your Font Size

A blogger lamented recently that none of the Bible software programs that he has used allow the font size to be enlarged enough so that it is readable when projected on a big screen.
We were happy to inform him that Logos works very well on a screen. A user can easily change the zoom up to 400% (= 48 pts.)—and with a simple script code all the way up to 999% (= 120 pts.)!
The default zoom for resources and reports is 100%, which is equivalent to a 12 pt. font. That may be too small depending on the size and resolution of your monitor—and depending on your purpose. Changing it is a cinch.
There are a couple of ways you can adjust your font size.

  1. All Resources: You can set all resources to use a certain zoom. Do this by going to Tools > Options > General > Text Display and selecting anywhere from 50% to 400% under the Default Zoom drop down. You probably want to leave the box checked next to Use Default Zoom Only with Resources, but test it for yourself to see what you like. You can also change the reports separately. (I have my default zoom set to 150% most of the time, but Bible Speed Search set to 125%.)
  2. Individual Resources and Reports: You can also adjust the zoom on individual resources and reports by using the Zoom icon in the toolbar or by going to View > Zoom. I recommend doing this only after you have set your default zoom. (If you want to change these later, you’ll have to do so one resource at a time! I learned that the hard way as a new user.)

Here are two other tips that some users might find helpful.
What if you want to set your default zoom to something other than what is available in the options (e.g., 135% or 500%)? With a simple script code, you can get as precise as you want.
In the following script code, replace 135 with whatever two or three digit number you want. Create a new toolbar button using the Run Script Code command. Click the button to execute the script.
Here’s the script code:
Application.UserPreferences(“LDLS/ResourceSettings”).SetValue(“Strings”,”Zoom”,”135″);
Another thing you can do is create a button that will toggle between your default zoom and another zoom. This comes in very handy if you prefer one size for a resource when it’s in a smaller window and another size when it’s maximized for reading or displaying on a screen.
To do this, create a toolbar button using the Run Script Code command and this script:
var objWindow = Application.ActiveWindow;
if ( objWindow != null )
{
if ( objWindow.Type == “resource” )
{
var objView = objWindow.View;
if ( objView && objView.IsOpen() )
{
var objDisplayPane = objView.Panes(“display”);
if ( objDisplayPane )
{
var strZoom = objDisplayPane.Control.Zoom;
if ( strZoom != “175%” )
strZoom = “175%”;
else
strZoom = “auto”;
objDisplayPane.Control.Zoom = strZoom;
}
}
}
}

Replace the 175 with whatever two or three digit number you’d like. You can create multiple buttons to use for different purposes.