12 New Bundles to Build Your Library!

Scholar's Reference Bundle (140 Vols.)We prepared 12 new bundles for ETS and SBL and wanted to share these specials with you as well. Each of these collections was carefully crafted and offers some really nice savings.

Whether you’re into the original languages, OT studies, NT studies, church history, theology, or apologetics, there’s something here for just about everyone.

For those of you who want to beef up the Greek and Hebrew sections of your digital library, we have three language supplements containing some of our best original language resources:

Many of our other top-selling resources and collections have been conveniently combined into these nine bundles.

Go take a look at what’s included and see if anything here would be a good addition to your Libronix library.

The New Guy

After posting a couple videos on the blog, I realized that I hadn’t actually introduced myself (and neither had Phil . . . thanks Phil). So, by way of introduction, I’m Ryan Burns, and I’m the new guy in the office. I joined Logos about 2 months ago and have been loving it up here. I say, “up here” because prior to taking this job at Logos I was attending a Seminary 3,200 miles from Bellingham, in the sunny city of Orlando, FL. Now, while I do occasionally miss the sun, I’m more than happy to trade the sun for the cool temperature and amazing beauty of the Pacific Northwest. That, and Logos has a sweet coffee maker, and I love coffee.
In all seriousness though, I’m really thrilled to be a part of the Logos family. I’ve been a user of Logos for a little over a year, and every day I get more and more excited about our product. Most specifically though, I’m excited about Logos for Mac. As a mac user myself, I’ve had to join many of you in booting up windows on my mac in order to run Logos. Thankfully, mac users, our day is coming . . . soon. With beta testing wrapped up, the second release candidate being run through the ringer, and pre-orders coming in daily, the finish line is in sight. It is almost here.
While it might sound silly, I think the thing I’m most excited about is being able to quickly launch Logos. I mean, no more starting Parallels and waiting. Starting windows and waiting. Logging in and waiting. Then, finally, getting to start Logos. In all, it usually took me 4 or 5 minutes to go through that whole fiasco just to run my beloved Logos. Top that off with the fact that I never really figured out how to run parallels efficiently and probably have far too few system resources allocated to it, thus Logos (and all my other Windows programs) always run slow. That friends, however, is all about to change. Soon, we’ll all simply look down in our dock (unless you put your dock on the side) and with one simple click of the mouse, we’ll be running Logos. That is just beautiful.
So, mac users, be excited. Our day is coming. If you haven’t pre-ordered, there is still time. And, I’d also remind you about our special deal for those of you who are already Logos users and are crossgrading.
These are exciting times at Logos. I’m happy to be here and be part of the family. And every day I come into work I sit down at my desk, pull my Macbook out of my bag, place it on the corner of my desk, and launch the latest build of Logos for Mac. It is my way of saying, “I love Logos . . . and I Iove it on my mac.”

Goodies for the Holidays

Today’s guest blogger is Adam Navarrete, who works in the marketing department here at Logos.

Just in time to get you thinking about your holiday cooking calendar, we held another bake-off this past Friday. There were more than a dozen delicious treats, but three rose to the top.

Our winners were as follows:

  1. Heidie Godfrey with her Chocolate Raspberry bars
  2. Elise Starkovich with her In Search of Wow Wow Wibble Woggle Wazzie Woodle Woo (translation: Cookie Cheesecake)
  3. Elizabeth Sanborn with her Keebler Bars

We invite you to download the recipes and give them a try!

If you make any of these for your household, church function, or holiday event, let us know how you like them.

Enjoy!

Steve Runge Joins the Blogosphere

Steve Runge, a scholar-in-residence here at Logos and author of the Lexham Discourse Greek New Testament, the High Definition New Testament, and the forthcoming Discourse Grammar of the Greek New Testament: A Practical Introduction to Discourse Features for Teaching and Exegesis has contributed to the blog here on several occasions.

But he has a lot more to say about discourse grammar, his area of expertise, so he’s decided to start his own blog, NT Discourse. His stated goal is to remove the mystery from discourse grammar. If it’s still a mystery to you, you might want to give it a read.

Steve’s hit the blogging ground running, and has been averaging about five posts per week. Here’s a sampling of the kinds of things he’s been discussing:

If you’ve purchased the LDGNT or the HDNT and are looking for some help learning how to put them to good use, you’ll definitely want to check out Steve’s new blog. You RSS folks can grab his newly burned FeedBurner feed.

Even if you’re not into discourse grammar, you won’t want to miss Steve and his dog singing a duet!

An Important Update to Josephus in Greek

One of the benefits in doing what I do is interacting with different folks about the projects I’m privileged to work on. I get to interact with all sorts of people, many of whom give us valuable feedback on different products and projects. This happened within the past week, and I wanted to share the story.
Logos recently released the Josephus in Greek: Niese Critical Edition with Apparatus. This was a large project and involved a lot of work by a lot of people. It was a great feeling to finally hear that it had shipped because, with the apparatus and the newly-translated prefaces, this puts a lot of stuff that wasn’t easily available into the hands of a lot of folks.
After Josephus in Greek: Niese Critical Edition with Apparatus had been released a few weeks, I was forwarded some feedback from Steve Mason, who is a specialist in the study of Josephus. Some of Steve’s work is available in Logos format, see Josephus and the New Testament and the Flavius Josephus Collection.
Anyway, Steve rightly noted that, while in the Greek text, it wasn’t that easy to see if there were apparatus entries for a particular line of text. The Greek text and apparatus are separate resources that can scroll together, this allows one to scan the whole apparatus to notice if there are trends in omission/addition/correction sources. But it meant that the Greek text itself didn’t provide clues of apparatus entries. He was suggesting that we try to do some sort of linking to make the content easier to access.
In our correspondence, we figured out a solution to the problem. I could insert an apparatus note indicator after a line number if the line had an entry in the apparatus. Yeah, it sounds weird when you write it out. Here’s a picture of the newly-revised resource. Note the dagger (†) after the line number, that is the indicator of apparatus material relevant to the line:

The hover allows one to consult the apparatus content quickly. Note how it displays underneath the Greek line, so you can see which entry applies to which word in the line. If you would like to consult the apparatus further, just click on the indicator (†) instead of hovering on it, and the apparatus itself will be opened to the proper location.
All in all, this should help make the apparatus content even more approachable and useable. True, we should’ve had this type of feature implemented in the first place, but thanks to Steve Mason’s feedback and our conversation, we now have this implemented and available for everyone who purchased the Josephus in Greek: Niese Critical Edition with Apparatus collection.
How do you get it? Just go to our resource FTP site: ftp://ftp.logos.com/lbxbooks and look for the file JOSGK.lbxlls. Download it, put it in your resource folder, and the next time you start Logos it should be there and ready to go. (Vista users may want to consult this page for further info on downloading resources)

Lots of Journals from Logos

We’ve mentioned the Theological Journal Library several times here on the blog. It’s a favorite of many Logos users. But even though it’s a phenomenal deal, not everyone needs or wants all of that content.

If you’ve ever wanted to pick and choose only the journals that interest you, now you can. Visit our new Journals page to purchase individual journals from the Theological Journal Library.

Of course, do your math. It may be a better deal to get the whole bundle than piece together several individual journals. But in our effort to make more things available as individual downloads, we wanted to give you the option to purchase only what you want.

What about new content? The Theological Journal Library is typically updated annually. We plan to add that new content every year or two so you can stay up to date with the latest additions. You’ll be able to upgrade your current collection for a fee that corresponds to the amount of new content for that particular journal.

In addition to all of the journals from the Theological Journal Library, we also have a number of other journals and periodicals listed on our new Journals page. Be sure to give it a look.

Help Us Decide What to Put on Pre-Pub

Our Pre-Pub system let’s you decide which resources make it into production and which ones don’t—or at least which one’s make it sooner than other.

It works quite well for the most part. But for the Pre-Pubs that don’t generate sufficient interest in a reasonable amount of time, perhaps our time could have been better spent working on titles that you want to see turned into Libronix resources.

You get a say in which titles go up on Pre-Pub by submitting your requests to suggest@logos.com and posting them in the suggestions newsgroup. While those suggestions are very helpful, we can’t always license the things you want.

We’re considering another way that you can help us decide which books to Pre-Pub and which ones to pass by or put on the back burner. We’re tentatively calling it Pre-Pre-Pub. :)

Here’s how it will work. Visit the Pre-Pre-Pub page, enter your full name, and then vote on as many of the titles as you’d like. After you’re done, click the submit button at the bottom of the page. (Please vote only once.) After we’ve had enough people respond, we’ll do our best to put your recommendations into action and put up a new list.

At close to 500 titles, our first list might be a bit too large. If you move quickly, you should be able to get through it in roughly 10 minutes. Feel free to skip the ones that don’t interest you. A skip will count as a low vote. To help you navigate the list, we’ve arranged the titles in alphabetical order of the author’s last name.

Thanks for your help! As always, we welcome your feedback on how we can continue to offer you more of the books that you want.

Adding RefTagger to a WordPress Blog

WordPress Logo WordPress is one of the most popular and powerful blogging platforms. It comes in two flavors: the hosted version (i.e., WordPress.com) and the self-hosted version (i.e., WordPress.org). This tutorial addresses how to add RefTagger to a WordPress.org blog since it is currently not possible to add it to a WordPress.com blog. WordPress.com bloggers, jump to the bottom to find out how you can help to change that.

There are two ways to set up RefTagger on your WordPress.org blog: (1) use the plugin or (2) set it up manually. The plugin is the best option since it keeps the code separate from your theme, which allows you to change themes without having to reinstall the code. It also enables you to keep up to date easily with future changes and feature additions to RefTagger with WordPress’s simply one-click plugin updates. But some of you may prefer the control of the manual route or may just not know how to find your WordPress files via FTP.

So take your pick with either of the below methods.

Method 1: Using the Plugin

To use the plugin, you need FTP access to your site’s files—at least for now. With WordPress 2.7, you will be able to browse and install plugins right from the admin panel!

If you’re like me and happen to be using WordPress 2.7 Beta 2, adding a new plugin like RefTagger is amazingly easy.

  1. Simply navigate to Plugins > Add New (i.e., http://yoursite.com/wp-admin/plugin-install.php) and search for RefTagger. RefTagger should show up as the top search result.
  2. Click “Install” on the far right, and then click “Install Now” in the window that opens. It takes just a second or two to install, and then you’re taken to a screen where you can activate it.
  3. Click “Activate Plugin,” and then navigate to the RefTagger page under the Settings menu to customize it, if you’d like.

If you’re playing it safe and running WordPress 2.6.3 or earlier, here’s what you need to do to set it up.

  1. Go to http://wordpress.org/extend/plugins/reftagger/, and click “Download.” Save the zip folder, and then extract the contents.
  2. Fire up your favorite FTP program. (FileZilla is a nice free option.) Then navigate to the place where you installed WordPress. It’s probably in a folder called “public_html” or “www.” Locate the “wp-content” folder, and then open it. You’ll see a “plugins” folder inside. Open it, and then copy the RefTagger.php file that you extracted from the zip folder into that folder.
  3. Log in to your WordPress admin panel, and then go to your Plugins page. Find RefTagger in the list of inactivate plugins, and then click “Activate.”
  4. Navigate to the RefTagger page under the Settings menu to customize it, if you’d like.

Method 2: Adding the Code Manually

  1. Log in to your WordPress admin panel, navigate to the “Design” page, and click on “Theme Editor.”
  2. Find your theme’s “Footer” template, and click on it to open it.
  3. Scroll to the bottom, paste the customizable RefTagger code immediately before the </body> tag, and click “Update File.”
  4. Navigate to the RefTagger page under the Settings menu to customize it, if you’d like.

WordPress.com users, are you feeling a little left out? We want to help, but there’s only so much we can do. The good folks at WordPress.com are willing to consider adding built-in support for RefTagger, but they need to see that there is enough interest. One of the things that they look at is the number of times that our plugin has been downloaded and installed. If you have friends using WordPress.org, encourage them to download and use the plugin.

Finally, a word to those of you who create WordPress themes or help churches and ministries get websites set up with WordPress: please consider adding RefTagger as a standard part of your theme or site set-up process. It’s a great way to improve the service you provide to people—at no cost to you and with very little effort.

Why Should I Worry about the Septuagint (LXX)?

I recently posted about the progress we’ve made on our The Lexham Greek-English Interlinear Septuagint (LXX), but that post was primarily about our progress. It didn’t really answer the question, “Why should I worry about the Septuagint?”
Books have been written in attempts to answer that question; several are available for Logos Bible Software:

As you can see, much ink has been spilled on the topic of the importance and role of the Septuagint (LXX) in Biblical Studies. I don’t think I’ll answer the question conclusively here, but hopefully I can shed some light on it.
So, why worry about the Septuagint?
Well, for starters, virtually every Bible study method I know of—particularly those geared to students without advanced training in Greek and Hebrew—recommend the consultation of several different Bible translations when examining a passage. Did you know that the Septuagint (LXX) is the oldest translation of the Hebrew Bible that we have? So, when examining a passage in the Old Testament, it can be helpful to examine the LXX as well because it is another translation. The Lexham Greek-English Interlinear Septuagint makes some of the differences between the Hebrew and LXX available through translation differences and also through notes. Used in conjunction with the Lexham Hebrew-English Interlinear Bible, with reputable commentaries on OT books, and with other English translations, The Lexham Greek-English Interlinear Septuagint can be a benefit to your study.
Second, if you’re studying a New Testament passage that quotes the Old Testament, you should check out the source of that quotation. Many times, the NT author is likely using the Septuagint (LXX) and not the Hebrew Scriptures directly. This means examining the fuller context of the quote source is important to understanding how the NT author is using the passage. The Lexham Greek-English Interlinear Septuagint makes this larger context more accessible, particularly to those who may have only focused on the study of Greek in the New Testament.
(An aside, the best and most comprehensive treatment of the NT’s use of the OT is Carson and Beale’s Commentary on the New Testament Use of the Old Testament, edited by D.A. Carson and G.K. Beale, available for Logos Bible Software in the Baker Hermeneutics Collection (14 vols.))
Third, if you’re studying an Old Testament passage that uses an obscure Hebrew word, looking to the Greek of the Septuagint can help in understanding what may have been in the underlying Hebrew text. This in turn can help in coming to a better understanding of the Old Testament text. Consult lexicon articles (such as those in HALOT) which also mention how these more obscure Hebrew words may have been translated in to Greek; use these as a base to track down other citations that use the Greek word in a similar manner.
The same can be said, perhaps to a greater degree, of obscure New Testament words. Examining the Septuagint use of an obscure NT word can be enlightening. Again, use a lexicon (like BDAG) which classifies senses and provides both LXX and NT citations to hunt down LXX citations to follow up on instances like this.
These are only a few reasons why the Septuagint (LXX) should play a role in one’s study of both the Old Testament and the New Testament. So what are you waiting for? Subscribe to the pre-pub, lock in your low price, and reserve your copy of The Lexham Greek-English Interlinear Septuagint today!

Logos Bible Software for Mac

It’s been more than a year since we’ve shared any official news about Logos Bible Software for Mac here on the blog. We’ve intentionally been quiet because we wanted our next announcement to be more than just a minor progress report.

Well, since we’re posting with a title “Logos Bible Software for Mac,” we must have some big news. Yes, in fact, we do. We’re thrilled to announce that we’re just about there and are ready to start taking pre-orders.

Place Your Pre-Order

Those of you who have been waiting patiently can now pre-order one of our five Mac base packages.

Current Logos users who want to crossgrade and move their existing Logos Bible Software digital library over to our new Mac software can purchase the Logos Bible Software for Mac engine for only $59.95.

Special Promo

Wait! Before you buy the Mac engine, you might be interested to know that you can get it for free.

Here’s the deal. If you spend $250 or more on live products at Logos.com or over the phone (800-875-6467) in a single order during the month of November, we’ll send you the Mac engine for free as soon as it’s ready.

Find out more.

Watch the Demo!

Want to see it for yourself? Watch the demo video below.