Update to Gesenius’ Hebrew Grammar

Thanks to an email sent to suggest@logos.com from a Hebrew professor at Bethel Seminary in St. Paul, MN, we’ve made a nice update to Gesenius’ Hebrew Grammar that will make it more useful when referencing and looking up his detailed section and subsection organization.

If you’re familiar with Gesenius, you’ll recognize a reference like GKC §19.b. In our original digital edition, we included all of the these sections and subsections as milestones, enabling you to navigate to a location like this by simply setting the Active Index to “Hebrew Grammar (Gesenius, Kautzsch, and Cowley)” and typing it in the box at the top of the resource. As you would scroll through the resource, the index would update letting you know when one section ended and another began.

As a general rule, it was fairly reliable, but there were some places where those divisions were a little difficult to be sure about, making it necessary at times to consult the print edition. That’s no good. Our resources are supposed to make things more convenient and save you time. So we rebuilt the resource with the subsection letters added prominently in the left making it easy to see the divisions.

In addition to this improvement, we also fixed all the typos that had been reported (thanks for sending them!) and added links to some new data types that weren’t around when the grammar was first produced, most notably the Semitic Inscriptions data type.

The new file is now on our FTP site and is free to all existing owners. Be sure to grab it. You can download it manually and drop it in your resources folder (C:\Program Files\Libronix DLS\Resources), or just run the resource auto update script.

If you don’t already own it, there are several ways you can pick up this standard Hebrew grammar.

Thanks for your suggestions and feedback. We aren’t always able to reply, but we do read them all and implement many of them. Who knows? Your suggestion may be the next one we put into place, benefitting not only you, but potentially many thousands of other users. So keep ‘em coming, and keep sending those typo reports as well!

Tip from CS: Make Sure You’re Up to Date

We’re starting a weekly blog contribution from our Customer Service department. In it you’ll learn a variety of tips to help you keep your copy of Logos Bible Software running smoothly. We hope you enjoy the series.

Today’s guest blogger is Elizabeth Sanborn, a member of our Customer Service team.

One problem we encounter often is when users install an outdated version of Libronix from an old disk onto a new computer running Windows Vista. Older versions of Libronix are not compatible Vista, so it’s essential that you install the most recent version, which is presently 3.0e.

Everyone should be running Libronix DLS 3.0e, regardless of which version of Windows you’re using. Products that were released earlier than 2008 won’t have the most recent version. You can save yourself a lot of time and effort either by installing directly from our website or by purchasing a media only disk, which is available for only $4.95 plus shipping.

If your version of Libronix is really old, you may need to purge off the old system instead of using Add/Remove programs. If that looks too complicated or scary, don’t hesitate to call us at 800-875-6467. We’d love to walk you through the process.

So this week’s tip is: make sure you’re installing the latest version on your new machine. More and more computers are coming with Vista, and we want to ensure that Libronix runs smoothly for you.

By the way, to find out what version of Libronix you are running, start Libronix and go to “Help” > “About Libronix DLS.” You’ll see this window pop up.

If you’re not running 3.0e or later, find out how you can easily get up to date—for free!

Adding Free Books to Pre-Pub Collections

Oftentimes we’ll get a newly licensed book that would be a perfect fit in a collection that’s already up on Pre-Pub. What we end up doing most of the time is sneaking that book into a collection and giving you more content at no additional charge. Every once in a while we’ll say something about it, but usually we do it without even telling you.

We usually have to raise the price after we add the new volume to cover the additional costs, but the good news is that those of you who already placed your pre-order are locked in at the lowest possible price.

We’ve done this several times recently, so I thought I’d call attention to them.

  1. Holman Reference Collection (13 Vols.), which contains the award-winning Apologetics Study Bible, added two new books: 131 Christians Everyone Should Know and Harmony of the Gospels.
  2. Studies in New Testament Greek and JSNTS Collection (17 Vols.) picked up Biblical Greek Language and Linguistics.
  3. The Moody Counseling Collection (11 Vols.) now has A Gift from God: Foundational Principles of Biblical Parenting.
  4. Face2face Collection (7 Vols.) got Elisha: Encountering the Messenger of Salvation.

What’s the moral of the story? We do our best to reward those of you who faithfully order Pre-Pubs—and do so early.

If you don’t want to miss out on little bonuses like these, make sure you’re subscribed to our Pre-Pub RSS feed. This is just one of the several reasons it’s a good idea to pre-order early.

Update: Two more collections just got new books!

  1. A. T. Robertson Collection (15 Vols.) added Preaching and Scholarship, the inaugural lecture given at Southern Baptist Seminary in 1890.
  2. Kress Biblical Studies Collection (8 Vols.) picked up Richard L. Mayhue’s The Biblical Pattern for Divine Healing and Snatched Before the Storm: A Case for Pretribulationism.

Who Recommends Logos?

We’ve updated our endorsements page and wanted to share it with you. Most of you who read this blog are probably already Logos users, so there’s not much personal benefit to reading the endorsements other than being able to say, “Cool! I didn’t know _______ uses and recommends Logos!”

That’s fun and all, but we really have two other reasons for mentioning our new endorsements page. The truth is, endorsements are a huge help to many people.

First, most people make purchases at least partially based on the recommendation of a friend or someone they respect. I’m sure you know people who are potential Logos users. In addition to sharing your own opinions about Logos Bible Software, you can provide additional help by pointing them to the opinions of ministry leaders, industry insiders, academic users, pastors and missionaries, and average Christians who love to study the Bible.

Second, you may know people who love Logos and rave about it (you may even be one!) but have never had the chance to let their voice be heard on a scale where it can benefit lots of other people. If you know of someone who has an endorsement of Logos that they’d like to share with the world, send them on to our endorsements page where they can submit their own feedback.

ETS/SBL Roundup

Although I wasn’t there, I heard that we had a blast at ETS and SBL this year. Thanks for stopping by and saying hello. We love to meet new users and get reacquainted with old ones.

In case you weren’t able to attend and don’t keep up with the blogs of Mike, Rick, and Steve, I thought you might like to know that their papers are now available.

Mike presented a paper on “The Concept of a Godhead in Israelite Religion.” He plans to turn it into two articles: one for a Christian academic audience, the other for a broader audience. If you’re interested in OT studies and theology proper, I’d encourage you to give it a read. He welcomes your feedback. Read more at Mike’s blog.

Rick’s paper was on “The Discourse Function of αλλα in Non-Negative Contexts.” He provides a helpful conference handout, as well as a nice abstract. If Greek conjunctions are your thing, this is sure to be stimulating reading. Read more at Rick’s blog.

Steve presented a paper at ETS on “The Exegetical Significance of Meta-Comments for Identifying Key Propositions,” with an accompanying PowerPoint presentation. The paper is a good taste of Steve’s forthcoming Discourse Grammar of the Greek New Testament: A Practical Introduction for Teaching and Exegesis, which is available for pre-order at Logos.com.

At SBL Steve gave a second paper on “The Discourse Function of Left-dislocation Constructions and their Contribution to Information Structure,” which also had a PowerPoint presentation. Read more at Steve’s blog.

By the way, we mentioned before that we introduced a number of new bundles and collections at ETS and SBL. They are still available at the same prices, so if you missed the first mention, be sure to give them a look.

Update: John Barry also presented a paper at SBL entitled “Will the Servant ‘See Light’?: A Reexamination of the ‘ôr Variant in Isaiah 53:11." He provides a helpful handout that summarizes his argument. Read more at John’s Blog.

Christmas Specials from Logos

As you know by now, we’ve been devoting a lot of time recently to Logos Bible Software for Mac. We started shipping on Friday afternoon, and we’re still busily filling orders. Since this is big—and much anticipated—news, we’re making it the focus of this year’s Christmas special. Save 25% when you purchase any of our five Mac base packages. We’ve also extended our promo on the Mac engine through the month of December, so you can still pick it up at no additional cost with a qualifying purchase of $250!

Don’t worry, Windows users. We haven’t forgotten about you. We’re also discounting our top-five Windows base packages.

If you’ve been saving up, now’s your chance to pick one up at a nice discount. If you don’t have enough saved up yet, you can always add it to your wish list or stop back in after Christmas. Prices are good through the end of the year.

Click the image below or visit www.logos.com/christmas08 and use coupon code Christmas08.

Logos Bible Software 2008 Christmas Specials

While not technically a Christmas special, the sale on the Word Biblical Commentary is also good through the end of the year and would make a nice gift for pastors, students, and scholars alike.

Update: For those of you who already own a base package, we’re also offering 25% off on base package upgrades. Now’s the perfect chance to upgrade to Gold at a nice discount!

Adding RefTagger to a bbPress Site

bbPress is free forum software from the makers of WordPress. Though it’s not as popular as some of the other options, it’s looks to be a nice, simple alternative to more complicated platforms. It also has the advantage of integrating nicely with WordPress.

The latest version of bbPress, 0.9.0.2, does not allow you to edit your theme from the admin panel, and no one has developed a RefTagger plugin yet either. So to add RefTagger, you’ll need to do it the old fashion way—via FTP access to your site’s files.

Here’s how to get it set up:

  1. Navigate to your bbPress folder.
  2. Open the bb-templates folder, and then open your theme’s folder. The default theme is kakumei.
  3. Locate footer.php and save a local copy (and a backup copy too).
  4. Open the file in Dreamweaver, WordPad or your favorite code editor.
  5. Scroll to the bottom and paste the customizable RefTagger code right before the </body> tag.
  6. Save the file and upload it back to your server.

You’re all set. RefTagger is now transforming your bbPress site.

If you’re using RefTagger on your bbPress site, send us an email and let us know!

The Answer to Your Question Is “Now”!

Logos Bible Software for Mac is now shipping!

Neo-pagan Religion: Stepchild of Secular Humanism

Today’s guest blogger is Adam Navarrete, who works in the marketing department here at Logos.

As the 2008 Logos Lecture Series comes to a close, I would like to personally thank our loyal attendees for making the lectures a wonderful time. Our final lecture for 2008 is only days away—so I invite you to join us this Monday!

Dr. Peter Jones of truthXchange will be speaking about the upsurge of neo-paganism.

With an overview on the rise of neo-pagan thought in the United States and abroad, Dr. Peter Jones shows that a neo-pagan pantheistic worldview is steadily displacing atheism and its materialistic secular humanism as the dominant mode of thought in contemporary culture. He’ll argue that conversions from secularism to pagan spirituality occur without too much difficulty because both deny the living personal God of the Bible.

Please note that this lecture will be held at the Mount Baker Theater in Bellingham, WA.

Event Details

  • Date: Monday, December 8th
  • Time: 7:00 PM
  • Title: “Neo-pagan Religion: Stepchild of Secular Humanism”
  • Speaker: Dr. Peter Jones
  • Location: Mount Baker Theatre in Bellingham, WA
  • Admission: FREE!

About This Month’s Speaker

Dr. Peter Jones, born in Liverpool, England, was educated at the University of Wales, Gordon Divinity School, and Harvard Divinity School. In 1971, he married and was a Ph.D. candidate at Princeton Theological Seminary before heading to France where he taught New Testament. There he also wrote, spoke, and helped start a Christian school and a church. Invited to teach at Westminster Seminary, California, Dr. Jones re-entered the U.S. where he experienced culture shock as a new spirituality had taken over America. This led him to write The Gnostic Empire Strikes Back. Dr. Jones is currently executive director of truthXchange.

His writings include Gospel Truth, Pagan Lies, The God of Sex: How Worldview Determines Sexuality, and Capturing the Pagan Mind. He also co-authored Cracking DaVinci’s Code and followed up with Stolen Identity: The Conspiracy to Reinvent Jesus.

What’s on Your Logos Wish List?

A little over a year ago, I wrote a blog post about two ways that you can create a Logos wish list using Google or Kaboodle. I recommended the Kaboodle method because of its ease of use with the integrated Firefox and IE plugins and its additional features.

Since that post, Logos user T. C. Black has written about a third way to create a Logos wish list using Amazon. Amazon has always had a nice wish list feature, but it was limited to items you could buy at their site. A few months ago they added a universal wish list feature that allows you to add items from other sites like Logos.com with a simple JavaScript bookmarklet.

It’s very easy to use and is perfect for those who already keep track of other wish list items at Amazon.

Here’s how to use it:

  1. Log in to your Amazon.com account, or create one if you don’t already have one.
  2. Create a new wish list, click “Edit list information” in the left sidebar to give it a name like “Christmas Wish List,” and then click “Make this list my default list” (applies only if this is not your first list).
  3. Drag the bookmarklet to your bookmarks.
  4. Navigate to a product page at Logos.com, like the John Piper Collection (24 Vols.).
  5. Click the boomarklet and fill out the information in the box that pops up.*
  6. Keep shopping and add as many other items as you want.
  7. Once you’re done, visit your wish list to make sure that all the settings are as they should be (e.g., is it public or private) and to share your list with others.

Here’s a sample Christmas wish list that I whipped up.

Create your own, and post a link to your wish list in the comments.

*One thing you might want to do in the notes section is specify whether you want the CD-ROM or the download, if applicable. If you want the download, be sure to provide your Libronix Customer ID in the comments as well. The individual buying for you can enter your Customer ID in the final stages of the checkout process. The only downside to going the download route is that you will receive a notification immediately when the order is placed. So if you want it to be a surprise, choose the CD-ROM option.