The Works of John Owen on Pre-Pub!

John Owen (1616–1683) is one of the most important Protestant theologians of all time. As both a pastor and a theologian, John Owen brings together some of the best in rigorous theological analysis and warm and vibrant spirituality making his writings food for both the mind and the heart.

Owen scholar Carl Trueman considers Owen “not only the greatest theologian of the English Puritan movement but also one of the greatest European Reformed theologians of his day, and quite possibly possessed the finest theological mind that England ever produced” (Biographical Dictionary of Evangelicals, 494). According to I. Breward, it was Owen who was “the great systematic thinker in the Puritan theological tradition” (New Dictionary of Theology, 552).

Our users have requested Owen for years, and we’re excited to finally make his works available. We’ve been in contact with several Owen scholars, and it quickly became clear that we needed to release the original Goold edition, which contains not only all the contents from the Banner of Truth reprint edition, but also Owen’s original Latin works (i.e., part of volume 16 and all of volume 17).

The introductory Pre-Pub price is only $174.95. That’s an enormous savings compared to the print edition—without even factoring in the value of the added Latin material. But this price will last only until April 4, 2008, at which time it will jump up to $224.95. Place your order now to lock in this incredibly low price, and help us spread the word to others!

If there is enough interest in Owen’s works, we’ll eventually put his 7-volume Hebrews commentary up on Pre-Pub as well. So put in your order, and tell your friends.

To learn more about John Owen in your Libronix library, see the following articles:

Study the NT Like Never Before!

Logos is pleased to announce another first in the study of the Bible: a visually marked-up discourse analysis of the entire New Testament in both English and Greek!

Dr. Steve Runge has spent countless hours studying the devices that speakers and writers of all languages use to communicate and tagging those devices in every book of the New Testament. Most of us use many of these devices in our everyday communication, but figuring out what they are, what they signify, and how to identify them in the Bible is something that the vast majority of people are not equipped to do.

The Lexham High Definition New Testament

For the English-only reader, we’ve created the Lexham High Definition New Testament (LHDNT), which comes with three Libronix resource files:

  • Lexham High Definition New Testament: ESV Edition
  • Lexham High Definition New Testament: Glossary
  • Lexham High Definition New Testament: Introduction

The text of the NT is marked up with visual representations for the 15 different devices. Hovering over any of the devices gives you a pop-up window with a concise definition, allowing you to stay right in the text. Right clicking on the device gives you the option to jump to the glossary for a definition, explanation, illustrations, and questions to ask yourself to understand why the author used that specific device. Since all of these devices are tagged, you can even search for the various devices across the entire NT or in specific corpuses of Scripture. And for those who want to go even further in their study, the introduction to discourse grammar will give you an excellent starting point.

The Lexham Discourse Greek New Testament

Those with even a little knowledge of Greek (or plans to learn some Greek in the future) will want to purchase the Lexham Discourse Greek New Testament (LDGNT) instead. The LDGNT is the Greek counterpart to the LHDNT, and it has several advantages over the English version.

  1. The analysis is more detailed. Instead of 15, more than 30 devices are annotated in the Greek text, allowing for even greater precision. The glossary and introduction are larger and more detailed as well.
  2. The Greek version has a more powerful search interface making more advanced queries possible.
  3. Finally, the LDGNT includes all three resources from the LHDNT, enabling you to view the Greek and the English side by side—the perfect setup for those who are still learning Greek and for those whose Greek is a bit rusty.

Find out more and place your order at the two product pages:

For even more information, read Dr. Runge’s three blog posts:

Looking Up Bible References from the Web

If you have a website or a blog, you can make your content much more useful to your readers by adding RefTagger. A good number of sites are already using RefTagger, but unfortunately the vast majority still have plain old text Scriptures references.

So what do you do when you’re reading content on one of those sites? As a long term solution, you could email them and encourage them to add RefTagger. But your short-term options are either to ignore the passages of Scripture and not check the author on his points, or to take the time to look them up manually in Libronix or at one of the online sites like BibleGateway. I’d imagine that most of us usually do the former since the latter takes a fair bit of time and effort if you’re having to look up more than just a reference or two.

But there is another option. It’s quick and easy and works with just about any web page—and it uses your favorite Bible software program. In Libronix open a new verse list (File > New > Verse List), click Add, select From Web Page, and paste in the URL of the web page that you are viewing.

Libronix will quickly find all the Bible references mentioned and add them to your verse list in the order in which they appear on the web page. You can then decide how you’d like to view them. The default is to show only the references without the text. Double clicking those references will open them in your preferred Bible allowing you to read them in their contexts, compare them with other versions, or dig into your study Bibles and commentaries. If you’d like to see the text of the verses along with the references, you can select "References and Text in One Column" or "References and Text in Two Columns."

I find that this works best on a two-monitor setup, which enables you to have your browser on one screen and Libronix on the other. But even if you have only one monitor, you’re still likely to benefit from this feature by using alt+tab or positioning your browser and Libronix next to each other.

If you find yourself using this often, you may simply want to save the verse list as “Web Verses” (or something similar) and reopen it each time you do reading online. You can easily delete the previous verses by using the delete key and add new ones when you’re reading a new article.

With this simple tool you can now quickly and easily look up Scripture references on the web.

“Free” Libronix Books Hidden on Your Bookshelf

An avid user emailed me last week excited that he had just found a Libronix CD-ROM in the back cover of one of his print books. He has owned the book for months, but never knew that the CD was for Libronix and had the entire book on it—unlocked and ready to use. He decided to take the time to look through his print library and found that he had two more books sitting on his shelf with "free" Libronix resources waiting to be installed.

You may want to take a few minutes to check your own print library. Fortress Press has published 17 print books that include the Libronix CD-ROM in the back cover. These can be purchased in a collection of 18 or individually.

If you already have one or more of these, but weren’t aware that the CD-ROM in the back was a Libronix book, you’ll want to be sure to add it to your digital library. There’s nothing more you need to purchase or unlock. Just pop in the CD-ROM and activate it like any other product.

You may just have some "free" Libronix books sitting on your own bookshelf. Go have a look!

Moulton-Howard-Turner Greek Grammar Collection Shipping Soon!

If you’ve been to the Pre-Pub page recently, you may have noticed that our featured Pre-Pub is the five-volume Moulton-Howard-Turner Greek Grammar Collection, which is scheduled to ship on 3/17/2008. I’ve been looking forward to this one since it was first announced in June of 2006, so I can’t wait to have these five volumes in my Libronix library.

  • A Grammar of New Testament Greek Vol. 1: Prolegomena
  • A Grammar of New Testament Greek Vol. 2: Accidence and Word-Formation
  • A Grammar of New Testament Greek Vol. 3: Syntax
  • A Grammar of New Testament Greek Vol. 4: Style
  • Grammatical Insights into the New Testament

We used Turner’s volume on syntax in an advanced Greek grammar course in seminary, and I found his meticulous analysis to be incredibly helpful. Grammars make excellent resources to have in your Libronix library. Not only will you be able to instantly check the thousands of biblical examples that the authors cite, but you’ll also be able to jump to other grammatical tools like Robertson’s Grammar, Zerwick’s Biblical Greek, and BDAG to compare and do further study.

Having this set integrated into the Exegetical Guide in Logos will exponentially increase its usability. The Exegetical Guide finds the passage you are studying and gives you all the places where your grammars mention or discuss it. With several solid grammars in your library, you’ll never be short on exegetical gems for your sermons, lectures, papers, and articles.

If you haven’t yet placed your pre-order for this set, there’s still time to get it for the low price of $199.95. CBD sells the four-volume set for $269.99. If you buy ours, you’ll save $70, receive a fifth volume at no extra cost, and get a much more usable collection of resources.

ANET on Pre-Pub!

Customers have asked for Ancient Near Eastern Texts (ANET) for years, and we’re thrilled to announce that it is finally on Pre-Pub.

If you already have The Context of Scripture (COS), you’ll still want to add ANET to your digital library for two reasons. First, while the two volumes have some overlap, both ANET and COS have texts that the other does not have. So you need both if you want access to all of the texts. Second, ANET is much older than COS, which means that most books that reference ancient Near Eastern texts will cite ANET rather than COS. Having ANET makes looking these references up much easier.

Those who recently purchased the new Semitic Inscriptions: Analyzed Texts and English Translations (CD-ROM) will be happy to know that it has scores of links to ANET, allowing you to jump instantly to the various texts.

The Pre-Pub price is currently only $59.95. Amazon sells the print volume for $115. Don’t miss out on this incredible deal!

Can I Get That As a Download, Please?

Today’s guest blogger is Adam Navarrete, one of the new additions to the marketing department at Logos.

In the marketing department, we’re always running reports and looking for ways to provide you with better service. Over the last two weeks, an analysis of our top CD items has provided us with a spectrum of titles to make available for download. What this means is that those of you who have not already added these great collections or individual titles to your library can now do so without having to wait for discs to make their way to you—and you can save a few extra dollars on shipping costs!

The greatest thing about purchasing downloadable resources is that there is no wait time. Whether you are ordering after hours, on the weekend, or when you need a resource for class or to finish your sermon preparation, you get your product as quickly as your internet connection allows.

This becomes a benefit for those of you who have already purchased these items as well. Since the individual book files are now accessible as downloads, you have quick and easy access from the product pages in case your discs become damaged or get lost.

Here is what we have recently made available:

Expect to see more of our top products available for download very soon—along with other cool ways to provide you with even better service.

Get PowerPointSermons in Your Passage Guide!

Logos has teamed up with PowerPointSermons.com to offer you integrated access to a growing library of over 2,000 PowerPoint templates and JPEG images right in the Passage Guide. Finding the perfect PowerPoint for your weekly sermons or worship services is now easier than ever. When you’re doing your sermon preparation in the Passage Guide, you’ll now see attractive PowerPoint templates and images that correspond to your passage.

Clicking on an image takes you right to the PowerPointSermons site, where you can download the template. An annual membership comes with unlimited downloads, so you’ll never be short on professional-looking slides for all of your church needs.

Click the image below to learn more and find out how to sign up for a subscription.

If you’re not a pastor or teacher or just aren’t interested in this service, you can collapse the section and Logos will remember your preferences and keep it collapsed next time your run the Passage Guide. Collapsed sections do not slow down your reports.

The other option is to uncheck it in your Passage Guide properties, which is accessible at the top of the Passage Guide report. Once it is unchecked, it will no longer appear in your report.

For more information, see PowerPointSermons in Your Passage Guide! and How to Disable PowerPointSermons.

Speedier Reports with Just a Few Clicks

The Passage Guide, Exegetical Guide, and Bible Word Study reports provide you with massive amounts of wonderful information that would take you hours to find in print books. But we realize that not every user wants to see everything available—at least not all of the time.

If you find yourself not using some of the sections in any of these reports, you might want to take the time to customize them. Speedier reports are only a few clicks away.

The first option is simply to collapse any section of the report that you want to see only some of the time. A collapsed section doesn’t take any of your system resources, so it won’t slow down your report. Once you run the report, you can decide if you want to see the information in that section and click the plus sign to run it. Logos will remember your preference from the last time you ran the report, so all you need to do is leave the appropriate sections collapsed or expanded when you close it.

If there are sections that you are fairly certainly you will never want to see, you can uncheck them in the report properties, which is located at the top of the report towards the right. Unchecked sections won’t show up at all, making for a more streamlined report with just the information that you want to see.

The time it takes to load your report will be identical whether you simply collapse a section or uncheck it in the properties. You should decide which method to use based on whether you will occasionally or never want to access the data in that section.

The time it takes me to run the full report above (an Exegetical Guide of 1 Cor 15:28) with everything expanded is about 12 seconds. If I collapse or uncheck the Word by Word section, my time is reduced to just under 7 seconds. Five seconds isn’t a lot of time, but it adds up.

You’ll really notice the difference with bigger reports. A BWS report on ἀνήρ with everything expanded takes about 4 minutes and 40 seconds to run. If I collapse the LXX, Philo, and the Apostolic Fathers, my time is cut to about 45 seconds!

Take some time to customize your reports and you’ll be saving time in no time.

How to Find That Missing Gem

Have you ever had trouble locating something that you previously read in one of your Libronix books? Perhaps it’s that perfect quote for the sermon or paper you’re working on—if only you could find it. If you don’t remember which book it was in, you can always check your history to see which books you’ve used recently. After you find the right book, you could then search or use the find bar to locate what you’re looking for—if you remember an exact word or phrase. But what if you remember only the general idea?

I’ve found that often the quickest way to find something in a situation like this is to use the Next button and select Markup.

I remember reading something in Strong’s Systematic Theology. I don’t recall exactly where it was or the precise wording, but I know I highlighted it. So I open Strong’s, switch the Next selection to Markup, click the button a few times, and I am quickly taken to the exact quote I was looking for. Of course, this works only if you are marking up your books when you read. If you’re not, I’d encourage you to do so, even if only for the benefit of using this cool feature. Keep in mind that if your book has hundreds of markups, you’ll at least need to remember the section or chapter to make this efficient. In my case, the quote I was looking for was in chapter two, so finding it was a breeze.

Another really handy use of the Next Markup feature is to get a quick survey of the parts of the book that stood out to you in your first reading. Try this with a chapter in a book, a large article entry, or a section in a commentary to get a quick recap of the most important points.

Give it a try. I think you’ll find it a convenient feature that will soon become a part of your normal use of Libronix.