Adding RefTagger to a bbPress Site

bbPress is free forum software from the makers of WordPress. Though it’s not as popular as some of the other options, it’s looks to be a nice, simple alternative to more complicated platforms. It also has the advantage of integrating nicely with WordPress.

The latest version of bbPress, 0.9.0.2, does not allow you to edit your theme from the admin panel, and no one has developed a RefTagger plugin yet either. So to add RefTagger, you’ll need to do it the old fashion way—via FTP access to your site’s files.

Here’s how to get it set up:

  1. Navigate to your bbPress folder.
  2. Open the bb-templates folder, and then open your theme’s folder. The default theme is kakumei.
  3. Locate footer.php and save a local copy (and a backup copy too).
  4. Open the file in Dreamweaver, WordPad or your favorite code editor.
  5. Scroll to the bottom and paste the customizable RefTagger code right before the </body> tag.
  6. Save the file and upload it back to your server.

You’re all set. RefTagger is now transforming your bbPress site.

If you’re using RefTagger on your bbPress site, send us an email and let us know!

The Answer to Your Question Is “Now”!

Logos Bible Software for Mac is now shipping!

Neo-pagan Religion: Stepchild of Secular Humanism

Today’s guest blogger is Adam Navarrete, who works in the marketing department here at Logos.

As the 2008 Logos Lecture Series comes to a close, I would like to personally thank our loyal attendees for making the lectures a wonderful time. Our final lecture for 2008 is only days away—so I invite you to join us this Monday!

Dr. Peter Jones of truthXchange will be speaking about the upsurge of neo-paganism.

With an overview on the rise of neo-pagan thought in the United States and abroad, Dr. Peter Jones shows that a neo-pagan pantheistic worldview is steadily displacing atheism and its materialistic secular humanism as the dominant mode of thought in contemporary culture. He’ll argue that conversions from secularism to pagan spirituality occur without too much difficulty because both deny the living personal God of the Bible.

Please note that this lecture will be held at the Mount Baker Theater in Bellingham, WA.

Event Details

  • Date: Monday, December 8th
  • Time: 7:00 PM
  • Title: “Neo-pagan Religion: Stepchild of Secular Humanism”
  • Speaker: Dr. Peter Jones
  • Location: Mount Baker Theatre in Bellingham, WA
  • Admission: FREE!

About This Month’s Speaker

Dr. Peter Jones, born in Liverpool, England, was educated at the University of Wales, Gordon Divinity School, and Harvard Divinity School. In 1971, he married and was a Ph.D. candidate at Princeton Theological Seminary before heading to France where he taught New Testament. There he also wrote, spoke, and helped start a Christian school and a church. Invited to teach at Westminster Seminary, California, Dr. Jones re-entered the U.S. where he experienced culture shock as a new spirituality had taken over America. This led him to write The Gnostic Empire Strikes Back. Dr. Jones is currently executive director of truthXchange.

His writings include Gospel Truth, Pagan Lies, The God of Sex: How Worldview Determines Sexuality, and Capturing the Pagan Mind. He also co-authored Cracking DaVinci’s Code and followed up with Stolen Identity: The Conspiracy to Reinvent Jesus.

What’s on Your Logos Wish List?

A little over a year ago, I wrote a blog post about two ways that you can create a Logos wish list using Google or Kaboodle. I recommended the Kaboodle method because of its ease of use with the integrated Firefox and IE plugins and its additional features.

Since that post, Logos user T. C. Black has written about a third way to create a Logos wish list using Amazon. Amazon has always had a nice wish list feature, but it was limited to items you could buy at their site. A few months ago they added a universal wish list feature that allows you to add items from other sites like Logos.com with a simple JavaScript bookmarklet.

It’s very easy to use and is perfect for those who already keep track of other wish list items at Amazon.

Here’s how to use it:

  1. Log in to your Amazon.com account, or create one if you don’t already have one.
  2. Create a new wish list, click “Edit list information” in the left sidebar to give it a name like “Christmas Wish List,” and then click “Make this list my default list” (applies only if this is not your first list).
  3. Drag the bookmarklet to your bookmarks.
  4. Navigate to a product page at Logos.com, like the John Piper Collection (24 Vols.).
  5. Click the boomarklet and fill out the information in the box that pops up.*
  6. Keep shopping and add as many other items as you want.
  7. Once you’re done, visit your wish list to make sure that all the settings are as they should be (e.g., is it public or private) and to share your list with others.

Here’s a sample Christmas wish list that I whipped up.

Create your own, and post a link to your wish list in the comments.

*One thing you might want to do in the notes section is specify whether you want the CD-ROM or the download, if applicable. If you want the download, be sure to provide your Libronix Customer ID in the comments as well. The individual buying for you can enter your Customer ID in the final stages of the checkout process. The only downside to going the download route is that you will receive a notification immediately when the order is placed. So if you want it to be a surprise, choose the CD-ROM option.

Family Fun with Logos

When I travel, I almost always take my laptop with me. Being able to read and study the Bible and Christian literature without having to pack print books is perfect for flying, especially now that many airlines charge extra for your luggage. I’ve heard that some airlines have even considered charging by weight.

But Logos is more than just a Bible study tool. It’s great for fun and games too. I’m sure most of you are aware of the Word Find. You can find it under Tools > Bible Puzzles > Word Find. I’ve used it on a couple of occasions while traveling. It’s not just for kids.

During my last trip to Minnesota to spend Thanksgiving with my wife’s family, I found a couple of new uses for Logos when we were playing games around the kitchen table.

First, I was introduced to a word game called Boggle. The goal is in three minutes to come up with as many words as you can that no one else comes up with—the longer the word the better. As you can imagine, you often have to come up with words that are uncommon. This sometimes involves a bit of guessing, which in turns requires that a dictionary be handy.

I pulled up Merriam-Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary, which comes in most of our base packages, and the Concise Oxford English Dictionary, linked them together, and had fun looking up and learning many new words.

My brother-in-law tried to use a traditional paper dictionary, but I don’t think he even got to the right section of the dictionary before I had looked the word up in two dictionaries. I highly recommend using Logos the next time you need a dictionary for family game time. Less waiting and more time having fun.

Second, another game we played with Logos was one I made up myself. I would read a random verse of Scripture after performing a Bible Speed Search, and the first person to guess the book it was found in would get a point. (You get only one guess until everyone has guessed.) If you could guess the full reference, you’d get a bonus point. This one was a lot of fun, but a little lopsided since my oldest brother-in-law is a pastor and was winning most of them.

These are just a couple of examples that illustrate how Logos is more than just a Bible study tool and can be a great addition to family game time.

How about you? What creative ways have you found to use Logos for more than just Bible study?

Sermons.Logos.com

sermons-logos-com.jpgAs a hat-tip to all our loyal Logos blog readers, we wanted to let you know about our latest online project, Sermons.Logos.com (beta). While we aren’t ready for a full-out release announcement, we thought it would be fun to let you guys and gals get the first chance to visit the site and “kick the tires.”
Sermons.Logos.com is an online community built around user created sermons and illustrations and already hosts over 56,000 sermons and illustrations.
Along with the ability to search Sermons.Logos.com using the same powerful search engine that runs Bible.Logos.com, you can also rate sermons, subscribe to sermon RSS feeds, create links to sermons and illustrations you want to share with people, and even create your own user account to upload your sermons and illustrations to the site.
If you already have a Logos.com account, there is no need to create a new account to use the site. Your Logos.com username and password work on Sermons.Logos.com. Not only that, but you can also promote your church and your sermons by enhancing your profile with a picture, a link to your church, your title, organization, personal blog or website, denomination, and much more. To enhance your profile, just visit: https://www.logos.com/user/MyProfile.
If you’re a Logos user and have the Sermon File Addin, contributing to Sermons.Logos.com is as easy as checking the “add my sermons to the Logos database” checkbox. Your sermons will automatically be added and, even more, when you edit them within Logos, your edits will appear on the site as well.
So, there you go. Remember, the site is in beta, so go check it out and let us know what you think.

Logos User Stories

Last week I wrote a post about my Logos epiphany; that moment when I realized I can have my entire theological library with me all the time. Over the week many users posted comments about the time when they had that same realization. Reading the comments, I was deeply encouraged to see how having a Logos library has helped men and women serve their churches, ministries, and communities. Since I know that a lot of people don’t often go back and read comments on old posts, I thought I’d share a couple that really impressed and inspired me.

Continue Reading…

Black Friday

parkinglot.jpgLast year was the first time I ever went shopping on Black Friday… it was also likely my last.
Now, I understand that for some people, Black Friday is a tradition. Sure, there are some really good deals out there, but for me, I’d much rather just hop online, price compare in my PJs, and have my products delivered to my door. But, if you’re into getting up at 3:30 in the morning to catch a deal, that’s fine with me. I’ll be sleeping.
For those of you scouring the internet today for deals, I thought I’d take the opportunity to remind you of a couple specials we have going on here at Logos.com.
Word Biblical Commentary Series – Retail $1,199.99 sale price $599.95 (save 50%)
Individual Volumes of the Word Biblical Commentary Series – Retail $49.99 sale price $24.99 (use code WBC) (save 50%)
Advanced Greek Supplement – Retail $411.86 sale price $299.95 (save 27%)
Advanced Hebrew Supplement – Retail $415.89 sale price $259.95 (save 37%)
Original Languages Supplement – Retail $725.33 sale price $514.95 (save 25%)
Ancient Near Eastern Bundle – Retail $1446.80 sale price $693.95 (save 52%)
Hebrew Bible Bundle – Retail $2578.00 sale price $974.95 (save 62%)
Early Judaism Bundle – Retail $2267.59 sale price $524.95 (save 77%)
New Testament Studies Bundle – Retail $5741.40 sale price $1199.95 (save 79%)
Early Church Bundle – Retail $1273.44 sale price $549.95 (save 57%)
Protestant Theology Bundle – Retail $1843.64 sale price $845.95 (save 54%)
Christian Apologetics Bundle – Retail $1437.36 sale price $429.95 (save 70%)
Theological Reference Bundle – Retail $664.87 sale price $359.95 (save 46%)
Scholar’s Reference Bundle – Retail $5480.51 sale price $2389.95 (save 56%).
All pre-orders of a Logos for Mac Base Package are 25% off!
Free Logos for Mac Engine for crossgrade when you spend $250.
And don’t forget all the great deals on pre-pub!

Free Bible Study Magazine – Review Copy

So, you haven’t checked out Bible Study Magazine yet? Well, here’s your chance. For a limited time, we are giving away a free review copy of Bible Study Magazine.
In order to receive your copy, all you have to do is agree to write a review of the magazine anywhere you can, in a church bulletin, ministry newsletter, blog, website, forum, or any other place that you have the opportunity to communicate with people.
So, if you’d like a free review copy, send an email to rburns@logos.com with Bible Study Magazine Review Copy Request as the subject. Also, be sure to include your mailing address so I know where to send it!
Review FAQs:
Do I have to be a blogger or journalist to get a review copy?
No. If you have any outlet for sharing a review, then we’ll send you a copy. So, if you have a newsletter, church bulletin, email list, blog, website, skywriting service, or any other way to communicate with people, then you qualify.
How long does my review have to be?
Length is up to you. Obviously, if you’re putting something in a church bulletin, then you’re not going to have room for a full-out review. In that case, an adequate review might sound something like, “There is a great new magazine you should check out. Bible Study Magazine is an excellent resource to aid in your Bible study. More info can be found at www.BibleStudyMagazine.com.” If you’re a blogger, you have more room to review, so feel free to make your review as long as it needs to be.
Do I have to send you a copy of my review?
Short answer, no. However, we would love to see what you thought of the magazine. If you post your review online, drop me an email or post a comment with a link below so we can check it out. If your review appears in print, you’re free to mail a copy to us. Skywriters, please send pictures!
Logos Bible Software
1313 Commercial St.
Bellingham WA 98225-4307
USA.
*Due to international shipping cost, we have to limit our reviewers to only those in the US. Sincere apologies to our international blog readers.
[Update: Review requests related to this post are no longer being accepted at this time.]

A Library on the Bus

bus.jpg

As I was riding the bus to work last week, I was reading 1 Peter 1:3-5 on my Beta copy of Logos for Mac (part Bible study, part Beta testing). I sat there thinking about all the great promises of God within this text and thought, “I wonder what Dr. K. has to say about this.” So, I hit apple+L (that’s control+L for you windows users) and opened my library. At that moment I had an epiphany. Now, if you’ve been a Logos users for a while, you’ve probably already had this epiphany. For some of you, this epiphany is the reason you bought the software in the first place. For me, it was a new thought… I have a library on my computer.
Now, sure, everyone who has a Logos base package knows that he or she has a library on his or her computer, but this day was different. As I opened Kistamaker’s commentary, I thought about how big the print edition of this book would be. I own a couple hard copies from Baker’s New Testament Commentary Series and these are big, heavy, hardcover books. I chuckled as I thought about how funny it would look if I were on the bus trying to read my Bible and this commentary. It just wouldn’t work out too well.
aybd.pngThen I opened my Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary to see what it had to say about hope and remembered from my seminary days how incredibly large this book would be if I had it in my lap right now. I clicked more and more resources. As I opened the ESV English-Greek Reverse Interlinear of the NT and my Analytical Lexicon of the Greek New Testament to study the original language in a little more detail, it just got funnier. By this point I probably had 5 or 6 books open, in my lap, on a crowded and bouncy bus. This kind of study would simply be impossible with the print equivalent.
The bus rounded the corner and I saw my stop approaching. I quickly closed my computer and tossed it in my bag. As I stepped off the bus and started walking towards Logos, I thought back to my campus ministry days. OH, how I wish I had Logos back then! I constantly battled between having my library at the church office or my home office. I was continually toting books back and forth. Then there were my trips to study on campus. Between these three places it was inevitable that I would want or need one of the books that weren’t where I was at the moment. How easily this could have all been solved if I only had Logos back then.
So, what about you? When did you have this epiphany? Where do you find yourself saying, “I could never do this if it weren’t for Logos?” Drop a comment below and share your story.