New Pre-Pubs from Wesleyan Publishing House

Wesleyan Bible Commentary Series (18 Vols.)Last week we put 43 new titles on Pre-Pub from Wesleyan Publishing House. In addition to their 18-volume commentary series covering the entire NT and three OT books, there are resources on holiness, the church, worship, devotions, and a number of other personal and ministry topics.

Have a look at these five new collections:

For other titles by Wesleyan, Methodist, or Arminian authors, check out these titles:

We’d love to hear from our Wesleyan, Methodist, and Arminian readers. What other titles would you like to see be made available? Leave a comment or send an email to suggest@logos.com to let us know.

Wallace, Runge, Decker, and Conrad Talk Greek

If you enjoy Greek grammar and linguistics, you’ll definitely want to read the fascinating discussion that’s been taking place over on Steve Runge’s blog, NT Discourse.

Steve’s post Markedness, Part 2 is what got things going. Rod Decker, Daniel Wallace, and Steve had a profitable three-way exchange in the comments.

Steve followed up with a second post What does ‘syntactic force’ mean? The back and forth continued in the comments with Carl Conrad (of the B-Greek list), Daniel Wallace, and Steve.

While Steve’s perspective is on the surface quite a bit different from the way Greek is taught in most Bible colleges and seminaries, there is actually significant agreement between well-respected Greek grammarians like Wallace, Conrad, and Decker and Steve.

Wallace, whose Greek Grammar Beyond the Basics has been used by tens of thousands of Greek students, sums it up well when he says, “It shows that we [grammarians and linguists] can cooperate in these projects and learn from each other. I believe that both sides have much to offer.”

If you’re interested in Greek studies and where they are going, be sure to read the dialog.

To learn more about Steve’s important work, check out his three products from Logos Bible Software:

Don’t Pay for Something You Can Get for Free.

Last week I read some advice that a seminary student was giving to potential Logos users. It went something like this: when trying to decide whether to invest in Logos, calculate the print value of the books that you think you’d actually use and, if that amount exceeds the cost of the package from Logos, buy it. But in your calculations make sure to exclude any books that are available for free elsewhere (e.g., from Google Books or Amazon’s Online Reader).

I think the first part of the advice is generally* sound, but the second part has problems. While it’s often a good idea not to spend money for something you can get for free, this is not always the case. The advice above leaves out two important factors: quality and convenience.

Quality

First, the advice above is not really comparing apples with apples. The quality of Logos digital books exceeds the quality of books available at Amazon’s Online Reader, Google Books, and other places on the internet.

So it may very well be worth paying money for books that are available for free online, if you want the ability to perform incredibly powerful searches, copy and paste text into papers or sermons with automatic citations, get instant access to Bible passages with a hover or a click, jump to cited books and articles, and all the other things that make Logos digital books so valuable.

So the advice would have been better if it had said, “Exclude any books that are of equal quality and available for free elsewhere.” But that still doesn’t quite do.

Convenience

Second, even if we were comparing apples with apples, that is, books of equal quality—or let’s assume you are the rare person who doesn’t need any of the benefits I mentioned above—there is value in the convenience of an integrated digital library. When your digital library is spread across multiple platforms and websites (e.g., Google Books, PDFs and Word docs on your computer, Amazon, and other places), it takes time (1) to remember where you have access to x, y, and z books and then (2) to perform multiple searches on multiple websites and desktop applications. That extra time spent can be quantified in terms of value, so it may be worth the money for the added convenience and time-saving benefit.

Let’s say you use iTunes for your music library. Numerous legal sources allow you to listen to music for free online, but you have to be connected to the internet and go to the website to listen to it. You can’t download it and integrate it into your digital music library in iTunes—or listen to it on your iPod. Perhaps for many songs that would be fine, but the benefit of convenience may make it worth it to purchase some music that is available for free elsewhere.

So I think we could further improve the advice by saying, “Exclude any books that are of equal quality and available for free elsewhere in a medium that offers equal convenience.”

Everyone has different needs and different financial abilities, and there are definitely times when it is financially wise to be content to use good secondary tools like Google Books and Amazon’s Online Reader. But if quality and convenience are important to you, it may very well be worth paying for something you can get for free elsewhere.


* However, I think you could make a case for why it might be wise to buy Logos even if the digital cost exceeded the print cost, but that is perhaps for another day and another blog post.

New Product Suggestions at Logos.com

One of the benefits of shopping online is the ability to get help from other customers when you’re making purchasing decisions. Amazon.com illustrates this well with their product reviews and product recommendations based on the purchasing habits of other Amazon.com shoppers.

For a while we’ve given you some purchasing guidance with our Top 10 Lists and Product Guides. We’re excited to add another source of information that will help you decide what to buy next.

Now at the bottom of every product page, you’ll find a list of products that other customers who bought the item you’re looking at also bought. We show you the top three, but you can see the top 10 by simply clicking more ».

In case you forget (or don’t want) to scroll to the bottom of the page, we’ve added a link at the top of each page that says, “Browse similar products.” Clicking it will jump you right to the bottom where you can explore and find all sorts of additional titles to add to your library.

For now we’ve put this new functionality in place only for currently shipping products, but you may eventually see it on Pre-Pub product pages as well.

Well, go give it a try, and let us know what you think. As always, we love to hear your feedback.

External Linking without the Warning Message

One of my favorite features of the Libronix Digital Library System is the ability to link from emails, Word documents, PDFs, blog posts, PowerPoint presentations, etc. to just about anything in Libronix. I’ve blogged about this feature before, so I won’t go into the details here. If external linking is new to you, be sure to give the post a read.

The one downside to linking to Libronix from Microsoft Office applications like Word and PowerPoint is that you get that pesky security warning every time you click a Libronix link.

Since there is no security threat at all, there’s nothing to worry about. You can just click “Yes” every time it pops up. But if you use external linking often, you may want to permanently disable it. It’s not incredibly difficult to do, but it’s not for the novice either. If you feel comfortable editing your registry, check out the appropriate support article for the details:

After a few short steps, the warning messages will be gone for good. Ah, much better.

Bible.Logos.com Gets Sermons Integration

There’s a new feature at Bible.Logos.com that you may want to check out. In the right-hand sidebar, we’ve added integration with Sermons.Logos.com, so you can reference additional material that deals with the passage you’re reading.

As you navigate through the Bible, we dynamically pull relevant content—both sermons and illustrations—from our Sermons site and display the top three hits with a link to all of the other contributions that deal with the passage of Scripture you’re in.

The coolest part is that no matter where you are in the Bible, the list is automatically updated so there are always related sermons and illustrations just a click away.

This is just a little taste of our vision to have a family of sites tightly integrated together. There’s much more to come.

By the way, you can help us continue to build the content at Sermons.Logos.com by uploading your own sermons for free. If you use Logos for Windows, our Sermon File Addin makes the process even easier.

Use coupon code SERMONS to take 75% off the Sermon File Addin. This offer is good through the end of the month.

Updates to the LDGNT and HDNT

Lexham Discourse Greek New Testament Bundle (6 Vols.)Last week we released our first round of updates to the Lexham Discourse Greek New Testament and the High Definition New Testament: ESV Edition.

Since we shipped these two products last summer, Steve has been working on writing the Discourse Grammar of the Greek New Testament: A Practical Introduction to Discourse Features for Teaching and Exegesis. Like the LDGNT and HDNT, the Discourse Grammar of the Greek New Testament is another first of its kind and promises to be a great supplement to Wallace’s Greek Grammar Beyond the Basics.

Writing this grammar has given Steve the perfect opportunity to make another careful pass over the annotations in the LDGNT and HDNT and make improvements to them.

Best of all, if you already own the LDGNT or the HDNT, you can get the updated files for free. If you use Libronix on Windows, simply run the resource auto-update script. Libronix Update will automatically copy the new files to your resources folder and overwrite the old ones.

If you’re using Logos for Mac, just download the two files (below) and copy them into your resources folder (i.e., Macintosh HD/Library/Application Support/Libronix DLS/Resources on the startup volume), overwriting the existing ones.

Right-click on the above two files and select “Save Link As…” (Firefox) or “Download Linked File As…” (Safari).

Free Russian Bible from Logos Bible Software

Русский Синодальный Перевод (Russian Synodal Translation)Do you read Russian, want to learn to read Russian, know someone who reads Russian, or just like free books (even if you can’t read them :))?

Then head on over to Logos.com and check out the free Русский Синодальный Перевод (that’s Russian Synodal Translation for you English-only readers), which just went up on Friday.

The RST was translated in 1876 and revised in 1956. Our edition has the Strong’s numbering system integrated for the entire Bible. That means you can simply hover over a word and see the Greek, Hebrew, or Aramaic word in a pop-up window (if you have a dictionary with Strong’s tagging like the Dictionaries of Biblical Languages w/ Semantic Domains, which are included in all of our base packages, except for Christian Home).

Those of you who have purchased from us before know the ropes. But if this is your first time, or if you just need a little refresher, then keep reading. Otherwise, just go download it and spread the word!

To purchase a book (or get a free book) from Logos.com, you’ll need three things:

  1. a copy of the Libronix Digital Library System installed on your PC or Mac
  2. a Logos.com account with a credit card on file
  3. a Libronix Customer ID that is connected to your Logos.com account

Here are the steps you need to follow to get all set up:

Step 1: Download and install Libronix for Windows. (Mac users can purchase the Mac version of the engine, or buy a Mac base package.) If you already have Libronix up and running on your computer, jump to the third step.

Step 2: Activate Libronix. When you do, you’ll create a Libronix Customer ID (usually your email address, if you enter it). You can find your Libronix Customer ID by going to Help > About Libronix DLS.

Step 3: Create a Logos.com account. If you already have one, just log in.

Step 4: Make sure that your Libronix Customer ID is associated with your Logos.com account. Go to My Account, enter your Libronix Customer ID from Step 2, and click “Confirm.” If it’s already there, no need to do anything.

Step 5: “Buy” the Russian Synodal Translation. Go to the page and click “Add to Cart,” or just add it straight to your cart from here. Proceed through the checkout process and then click “Submit Order.” If you don’t have a credit card on file, you’ll need to enter your credit card information. Don’t worry. You won’t be charged. It’s an unfortunate inconvenience in our current checkout system, and we hope to change it at some point.

Step 6: Unlock and download your new book. If you’re on a Windows machine, just click the orange “Unlock & Download” button. If you’re on a Mac, just synchronize your licenses (Tools > Library Management > Synchronize Licenses) and manually put the book file in your resources folder (Macintosh HD/Library/Application Support/Libronix DLS/Resources on the startup volume).

Step 7: Start using your new book! Open Libronix, open My Library, then type RST to find it. Since the title is in a different script, you’ll find it all the way at the bottom. Double-click it to open it.

Enjoy!

Have any Russian-speaking friends? Let them know how they can get a Russian Bible for free!

Two More Free Lutheran Lectionaries

Thanks to our friends at Northwestern Publishing House, we now have two more free Lutheran lectionaries available for everyone who owns one of our Windows base packages (excluding the Original Languages Library) or has purchased our Lectionary Viewer Addin.

  • Christian Worship One Year Lectionary
  • Christian Worship Three Year Lectionary (with Supplemental Lectionary)

To get them, just visit our Lutheran Lectionaries page and follow the instructions, or simply run Libronix Update (under the tools menu) from within the program. The lectionaries will appear under the “Recommended” section of the Libronix Update window that pops up. Be sure to check the appropriate boxes, and then click “Update.”

Once everything is installed, you’ll find these lectionaries in Libronix by going to Tools > Bible Data > Lectionary Viewer. Click on “Properties” to select which lectionary to display.

You can also easily integrate your new lectionaries into the Logos Bible Software home page by clicking “Customize View” and then checking the boxes next to “Lectionary” and any of the available lectionaries that you’d like to have appear.

Be sure to also check out the more than 100 other titles available from Northwestern Publishing House, like The People’s Bible Commentary, Sermon Studies, Lutheran Confessions: Concordia Triglotta, the Franzmann Bible History Commentary, and the Wisconsin Lutheran Quarterly. They are all now available as individual downloads or at a huge savings in one big bundle.

For more great Lutheran resources, see our Lutheran Product Guide.

A Protected Investment

It’s no secret to regular readers of this blog that we favor our digital books over their print counterparts and consider them to be superior when it comes to things like longevity, usability, space savings, cost savings, time savings, and ease of shipping and moving. Many of you are already convinced and choose digital over print as often as possible, but some of you may still be a bit skeptical. A couple of weeks ago, I came across another perfect illustration of how investing in Logos is one of the best ways to protect your investment in a biblical and theological library.

Ryan M. is a Logos user. I met him a while back on the Logos newsgroups. Over the last several years, Ryan has acquired more than 4,000 Libronix digital resources. He chose to build his library primarily with Libronix books partly because he and his wife, Sandi, were planning to do full-time mission work in Quito, Ecuador (and partly, I’m sure, for some of the other reasons I mentioned above).

After a few years of deputation and raising their necessary support, the time had finally come to leave the US and head to the field. As they made their final preparations, Ryan and Sandi gave away most of their earthly possessions and carefully stored up exactly what they would need to take with them. They were set to fly out of Detroit on January 5, 2009 and head to San José, Costa Rica, where they would spent their first year in language school.

The night before they left, the vast majority of their belongings were stolen—everything that they had prepared to take with them, except for their overnight bags and laptop.

Here are some snippets from a email that Ryan sent me last week:

My parents drove us to the airport in Detroit—about 2-1/2 hours from our home in Grand Rapids—to save us having to rent a car (we’d already given ours away). They reserved a nice hotel room for them and us quite near the airport; we stayed the night, and when we awoke the van and all our possessions were gone. (We think the vehicle has probably already been chopped up and that our stuff is being enjoyed by the thieves. Our name, address, and eddress was in every box, so there’s no secret about how to contact us to return any or all of it. But these were obviously evil people.)

. . .

Logos has been wonderful for us in this circumstance! The theft we experienced could have been even more damaging to our finances if I had packed a good number of paper books. I would also be without those ministry helps if I had been relying on paper resources. As it stands, I haven’t lost my theological library, for which I’m extremely grateful. I even have a digital copy of numerous Spanish resources and a Spanish-English dictionary!

Though this is a horrible situation to go through, Ryan doesn’t have to mess with the hassle and massive expense of trying to replace his library. And even if his laptop had been stolen as well, he could have gotten his entire Libronix digital library up and running with very little effort and at almost no cost. His 4000+ resources and all of his licenses are safe. But how easily could you replace your library?

Please pray for Ryan and Sandi as they adjust to a new culture, learn a new language, and try to replace all of the things that they lost. If you would like to be a financial blessing to them, you can donate directly through the HCJB Global website. (To help them in their immediate need, be sure to put “for personal use” in the “Add an Additional Note” blank.) You can read more about how you can pray for and help Ryan and Sandi at their blog.