Logos 4: Set Your Calendar Devotional for the Home Page

mp|seminars Tips

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos training seminars.

You’ve probably noticed in the main body of your Logos 4 Home page, Today’s Reading from a calendar devotional appears. Did you know that you can pick which devotional appears?

Here’s how:

  • Click the Library icon (book) in the upper left corner of the program
  • Select Prioritize in the upper right corner of Library pane
  • In the Library’s Find box, enter this text: type:calendar to display all of your calendar devotionals
  • Drag and drop the devotional you want on the Home page to the Prefer these resources list in the right hand pane

God’s Word for Your Questions

Got Questions?

Today’s guest post is by Sarah Wilson, on the marketing team.

Logos has an exciting new resource under development for your library: Got Questions? Bible Questions Answered a collection of 2,000 common questions with answers straight from Scripture.

You might be wondering what sets this reference work apart from the other commentaries, dictionaries, concordances, and resource guides that Logos has to offer.

Got Questions is not just another reference guide. It is an invaluable supply of important answers to basic questions about life, faith, the Bible, and theology. The publisher, Got Questions Ministries, identified over 2,000 essential universal questions that affect all of us—questions such as:

  • Does God exist?
  • Is there life after death?
  • What is Christianity and what do Christians believe?
  • What does the Bible teach about the Trinity?
  • What is postmodernism?

Imagine that you are looking for some relevant topics to jump-start your small group or Sunday school discussions. The format of this resource is perfect for planning a meaningful dialogue about the nature of God, applying Scripture, or what the Bible has to say about salvation. You’ll have the Scripture references right at your fingertips, as well as a succinct explanation of the topic. Or maybe you are considering preaching a series on how Christianity answers life’s big questions. Got Questions? Bible Questions Answered will help you get started finding the most applicable questions for your congregation. The concise answers will help you focus your sermons on what is truly pertinent to your listeners.

Got Questions? Bible Questions Answered was put on Pre-Pub this week and gathered enough interest for us to send it to development! As a starting point for study or just as a quick guide, this Pre-Pub is essential for your library. Be sure to get in on the lowest price available for this invaluable study tool.

Get Your Bible Study Tips Published!

biblestudymagazine

Do you have some great Bible study tips that have helped you in your study of Genesis? We want to hear about them!

The theme of Bible Study Magazine’s November/December 2010 issue will be Genesis: Tower of Babel to Joseph. We want you to submit your best Bible study tips on Bible Study Magazine’s Facebook page. The best tips will be published in our two-year anniversary issue, Nov/Dec ’10!

If you haven’t “Liked” the Bible Study Magazine page yet, make sure you do so. We are looking at interesting ways we can integrate content from the Facebook community into the magazine, and we are dreaming up some fun contests and giveaways as well! So, make sure you head over to the Bible Study Magazine’s Facebook page and “Like” it.

While you’re at it, check out the new Bible Study Magazine 2008–2009 collection on Pre-Pub. This complete collection of all the 2009 issues of Bible Study Magazine, plus the inaugural issue features over 350 pages of interviews, Bible study tips, info-graphics, archaeological and historical insights, and word studies. Just think, you can subscribe at nearly 50% off the cover price and never miss another issue and get the back issues from 2008 and 2009 you have missed in one bound volume!

And that’s right: Beth Moore is on the next cover! Tell your friends.

It’s Hard to Keep a Good Company Down

Update

On Friday, June 11, 2010, we had a robbery at our Mac satellite office in Bellevue, Washington. By breaking into the strongbox on the outer wall of the building, the thieves were able to get the fire department’s master key to let themselves in. When the cleaning crew discovered the break-in early Sunday morning, all of the computers were gone.

As inconvenient as this was to the Mac development team, it could hardly be considered a set-back. The machines had no access to corporate servers so there was no risk of data loss and—because it happened over a weekend—most of the developers had uploaded their code to the main office in Bellingham.

David Mitchell, the Mac team leader, was in the Apple store early Monday afternoon picking up new machines and we were back in business in no time!

The latest Mac release is looking really good and you can download the latest release (Alpha 22) right here.

Let Logos 4 Read the Bible to You

AudioToday’s guest post is from David Lemmons, one of the wonderful contributors on the Logos Forums.

I am a relatively new user of Logos. I have upgraded to version 4 and I have been learning more about it daily—there is still so much more to learn. I subscribe to RSS feeds of the Logos forums and learn new things about how to use the program just about every day.

One of the ways I use the software each day is in my daily Bible reading. I have a rather ambitious reading plan which leads me to read the Old Testament every 90 days and the New Testament every thirty days. This means I read the entire Bible four times each year and the New Testament an additional eight times.

My old system of getting this reading done was to open Logos to my preferred Bible and enlarge the text to the largest setting possible . In order to do my reading more quickly (and I think also to help retention), I use audio files to read as I scroll. I began with a set of MP3 audio files containing the narration of Eric Martin which I purchased for about $20. I adjusted the tempo of these 1189 individual files (one for each Bible chapter) by using the software Audacity. Adjusting the tempo did not result in the chipmunk-sound, rather, the words were easily understood, but were coming twice as fast as the pre-adjusted files. This project took quite a long time and was arduous, but I knew that once I got them prepared I would use them daily, so I did it. Reading the files at this faster pace requires one to concentrate more on the text and I think this is a useful serendipity.

A couple of weeks ago I learned that the very same thing that I had spent several hours of my precious time working on had already been provided by Logos 4.

I am using Windows Vista. All I needed to do was go to Control Panel and open up “Text to Speech.” I selected the voice that sounded best to me: “Microsoft Anna.” I set the “Voice Speed Slider Scale” to two notches slower than the very fastest setting. Then I opened up Logos4 to my Home Page. My two reading plans are on the home page. I click on the day’s reading. I hit the keys, and Anna reads to me at accelerated speed until I stop her by hitting once again . The scrolling is done automatically by Logos.

My reading for today was 1 Chronicles 23–29 and John 7–11. I read this in 26:30 minutes. With Logos 4, and its wonderfully adaptable reading plans, ability to read to me at whatever speed I choose, to scroll automatically through the Bible text, being a more disciplined daily Bible reader is so much easier and so much more fun—I love it!

Logos 4: Remove Bible Cross References in Copied Text

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Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos training seminars.

Quite often people will e-mail me inquiring about how to remove embedded footnotes from biblical text that is copied / pasted into a Word document. For example, if you select all of the text for Psalm 23 in the ESV and then copy / paste it into another document, you’ll also paste a lot of cross references.

Here’s one way to avoid that:

  • Choose Tools | Program Settings
  • Set Copy Footnotes to No

With this setting, Logos will still cite the source of the pasted text, it will just no longer paste all of the embedded footnotes and cross references into your document.

Taking Greek Syntax Beyond the New Testament

Cascadia

Today’s guest post is from Michael Aubrey, on the marketing team.

Here at Logos, we’re always working hard to stay on the cutting edge of biblical research. We first introduced syntax databases in 2006 with the release of Libronix 3.0 and they were rightly recognized as the “new frontier” in Bible software. Mike Heiser demonstrated the vast superiority of syntax searches over morphological proximity searches with some awesome videos. And then again, three years later in November, 2009, with the introduction of Logos Bible Software 4, we did it again.

We revamped the syntax search dialog, completely changing the layout and introducing some awesome functions like dragging and dropping and introduced a brand new database: Cascadia Syntax Graphs of the New Testament.

Personally, this was the database that, as a user, I had been awaiting for many reasons.

For one, Cascadia consistently uses accessible terminology: Noun Phrase (NP), Verb Phrase (VP), and Prepositional Phrase (PP). These are labels based transparently and helpfully on Greek parts of speech: nouns, verbs, and prepositions. There’s nothing novel; nothing obscure or obtuse. This is plain vanilla, what-you-see-is-what-you-get syntax.

But more importantly, as soon as I saw the Cascadia Syntax Graphs of the New Testament and read the preface, I knew there was massive potential here—far beyond the boundaries of the New Testament. The editors, Randall Tan and Andi Wu, write:

The Cascadia Syntax Graphs of the New Testament is derived from a new dynamic Treebank project developed by the Asia Bible Society. The Greek Syntactic Treebank Project is built on the basis of a computer-readable Greek grammar, with the syntactic trees (graphs) directly generated by a parser. Manual checking and corrections are stored as data in a knowledge base to guide the parser. The syntax trees (graphs) are dynamically generated form the latest version of the grammar and knowledge base, which enables continual organic improvement and growth as the grammar and knowledge base are maintained and updated.

We humbly present this preliminary version of the syntax graphs to users of Logos Bible Software and look forward to improving and expanding it in the future.

Randall Tan
Andi Wu
November 2009

Did you catch that? The Cascadia Syntax Graphs are derived from “a computer-readable Greek grammar” (my emphasis). If what that means and why it’s significant is lost on you, let me explain.

Unlike our other syntax databases, such as Opentext.org or the Lexham Syntactic Greek New Testament, the Cascadia database isn’t annotated and created by hand, one verse at a time. Instead, the trees are all created by the computer from grammatical rules based on the structure of Koine Greek. These generated trees are then corrected by hand. Every verse, every clause, every phrase and every word is reviewed as part of this process. While this is still quite a bit of work, it leverages text already analyzed (the Greek New Testament) to assist with the process of analyzing a new corpus (the Septuagint, and also the Apostolic Fathers). The key is that because these grammar rules are continually built upon and reviewed, they may potentially to be applied to any Koine Greek text.

That’s right: any Koine Greek text.

With that realization, we said to ourselves here at Logos, “Why not? Let’s give it a try!”

Built from the very same computer-readable grammar as the Cascadia Syntax Graphs of the New Testament, these two new resources will make it possible to go beyond the New Testament in your study of the Old Testament, New Testament, Early Church, and Koine Greek. Every syntax search you create for the New Testament will also work in these databases and vice versa. For the first time, you will be able to examine syntactic structures across more than half a million words of Greek text.

Are you curious about the influence of Hebrew on the Greek of the Septuagint? Not a problem. Just pull up the Cascadia Syntax Graphs of the Septuagint alongside the Andersen-Forbes Phrase Marker Analysis!

What’s All the Fuss about Baal in the Old Testament?

Ugaritic
Today’s guest post is from David Witte, Information Engineer on the Design and Editorial team.

When I read passages in the Old Testament I always come across the god Baal. This is usually a bad thing for the people of Israel. It seems that they could not help chasing after this deity with gusto. Many rich stories concerning the rulers and prophets of Israel include this nemesis, such as Elijah’s showdown on Mount Carmel (1 Kings 17-18) or Gideon’s nighttime vandalism (Judges 6:25-32).

So to understand Israel’s difficulty with Baal and how God worked within their lives, we need to understand how Baal was viewed at that time. The best place to gain that understanding is by looking at ancient Ugaritic literature. Ugarit was an ancient kingdom located just north of Israel where modern Syria exists today. There is extensive information in Ugaritic literature about Baal, who was known as the “king of the gods” or “the Rider on the Clouds.” Take a look at Dr. Mike Heiser’s excellent write-up “What’s Ugaritic Got to Do with Anything?”.

Understanding the theological environment of ancient Israel gives greater meaning to the stories of Israel’s great trials with, and triumphs against, false idols. God was with them through it all, but it was painful at times. That helps us address modern issues such as: Where do our true loyalties lie? What separates a true Christian from a mostly Christian? How do idols creep into our belief system unnoticed?

I love teaching the story of Elijah and the showdown at Mount Carmel. Whether re-enacting it with kids or walking through the story with adults, it never loses its magic. Understanding how big and important the adversary was, and how little and powerless Elijah was, shows us how almighty and loving our God is. I found Peter Craigie’s book Ugarit and the Old Testament to be a good introduction to the Ugarit people and beliefs. This can be found in the Introduction to the Old Testament Collection. For a more in-depth look at the Ugaritic language and texts look at to the Ugaritic Library.

Exporting Your Logos 4 Library to Zotero

About a year-and-a-half ago, I wrote a blog post that showed you how to export your Libronix library to the popular bibliography and citation manager Zotero. Since Logos 4 has launched, I’ve received multiple emails asking me if I’d explain how the process works with Logos 4.

Here are the five simple steps you’ll need to take.

Step 1: Change your citation style to BibTeX.

Go to Tools > Program Settings, look for Citation Style under the General settings, and select BibTeX Style from the dropdown. Or just type Set Citation Style to BibTeX in the Command Bar. (You can also use either the RIS or Refer/BibIX style.)

Step 2: Create a collection of all your resources.

Go to Tools > Collections and click New. Give it a name like All, and then enter rating:>=0 into the “Start with resources matching” box. This will find all resources with a rating of 0 or higher, which is equivalent to all resources. If you don’t want to export all of your resources, create a collection of just the ones you want.

Step 3: Export your collection to a text file.

With that collection opened, click on the panel menu and choose “Export to bibliography.” Give your file a name like Zotero, and save it to your desktop as a .txt file.

Step 4: Change your citation style back to your preferred style.

Once you’ve successfully exported your library or collection, you can change your citation style back to what it was before. You can do it through the Settings panel or via the Command Bar.

Step 5: Import your file into Zotero.

In Zotero, click on the Actions button and choose Import. Select your Zotero.txt file and click Open. Depending on how many resources you’re importing, it may take anywhere from a few seconds to a few minutes.

Once importing is complete, you’re ready to go. You can now use Logos 4 for your researching and allow Zotero to manage your citations and bibliographies.

Logos Co-Founder Speaks about the Best-Selling Pre-Pub of All Time

Dale Pritchett

Today’s guest post is from Dale Pritchett, Senior Vice President and Co-Founder of Logos Bible Software.

In the eighteen years we’ve been in business, the single most popular, and perhaps most important, Pre-Pub title we have ever offered is Learn to Use Biblical Greek and Hebrew with Logos Bible Software.

For many years now, schools have been downsizing Greek and Hebrew programs due to decreasing demand. Students have been opting-out of the rigorous language programs in such numbers that we now estimate that less than fifteen percent of all seminary students complete a Greek or Hebrew language course as part of their degree program. You have to believe, as a result, the exegetical skills in the pulpit have been greatly reduced. This concerns us greatly.

This is something we care about.

To change the status quo, we developed Learn to Use Biblical Greek and Hebrew with Logos Bible Software. This series is targeted at the eighty-five percent who opt-out of traditional language programs, as well as those who need to re-invigorate their once-learned skills. We hoped this series would help reverse the trend and make original language studies more accessible to average students. Little did we know how huge the response would be.

Everyone should experience the Bible in the original languages.

We are reaching out this one last time to encourage you to place your Pre-Pub order right away before the price goes up. We encourage you to join literally thousands upon thousands of Logos Bible Software users across the world who are committed to taking their Bible study to the next level by digging into the original languages, perhaps for the first time ever.

You can do this.

The videos are step-by-step. Self-study at your own pace. No previous knowledge of Greek or Hebrew is required. Even English grammar is explained. No rote memorization of forms or paradigms either. You can do this, and we are here to help.

A couple of weeks ago, the two instructors sat down to talk about their experience with the project. Listen to their thoughts here:

The time is now.

Logos users have chosen to pre-order this video series more than any other product we have ever offered on Pre-Pub. In fact, we even had to delay the ship date by two days just to account for the sheer quantity of DVDs we had to order. The good news for you is that it gives you one final chance to get in on the discount.

The training you need to finally get into the original languages is ready. Read more about this incredible training series, watch the introductory videos, preview some of the videos in the series, and place your order right away before the price goes up.

You should follow us on Twitter here.