Zerwick’s Grammatical Analysis of the Greek New Testament

Many who use A Grammatical Analysis of the Greek New Testament in print affectionately refer to it as “Max & Mary” after the author and translator/reviser, Max Zerwick and Mary Grosvenor. The affection is for good reason, “Max & Mary” offer a helpful and informed analysis of the grammar of the Greek New Testament. And they do it in a commentary format, so the Logos Bible Software version (which you already have if you have the Portfolio LE edition of Logos) scrolls synchronously with your text — English (reverse interlinear? yes!), Greek, or whatever other New Testament edition you have.
I’ll be honest: I haven’t used this book much; it seems I have so many other tools available! But I’ve learned that I’m the one who has been missing out. Why? First, some minor points:

  1. There is a great little “Glossary of Grammatical Terms” included in the front matter.
  2. There are links throughout, by section number, to Zerwick’s Biblical Greek, Illustrated by Examples (included in the Introduction to Biblical Greek Collection)

I’ll use 1Ti 2.3-7 as an example of the kind of stuff that “Max & Mary” offer, listing the Greek text (NA27) with the Lexham English Bible translation interspersed. I’ve also highlighted in bold all of the terms that are mentioned. The analysis will follow for each verse, broken out with one item per line.

3 τοῦτο καλὸν καὶ ἀπόδεκτον ἐνώπιον τοῦ σωτῆρος ἡμῶν θεοῦ,
3 This is good and acceptable before God our Savior,

3 ἀπόδεκτος (< ἀποδέχομαι welcome) welcome, pleasing.
σωτήρ 1:1

4 ὃς πάντας ἀνθρώπους θέλει σωθῆναι καὶ εἰς ἐπίγνωσιν ἀληθείας ἐλθεῖν.
4 who wants all people to be saved and to come to a knowledge of the truth.

4 σωθῆναι aor. inf. pass. σῴζω.
ἐπί-γνωσις knowledge.
ἐλθεῖν aor2 inf. ἔρχομαι.

5 Εἷς γὰρ θεός, εἷς καὶ μεσίτης θεοῦ καὶ ἀνθρώπων, ἄνθρωπος Χριστὸς Ἰησοῦς,
5 For there is one God and one mediator between God and human beings, the man Christ Jesus,

5 εἷς…θεός there is one God.
μεσίτης mediator.

6 δοὺς ἑαυτὸν ἀντίλυτρον ὑπὲρ πάντων, τὸ μαρτύριον καιροῖς ἰδίοις.
6 who gave himself a ransom for all, the testimony at the proper time,

6 δούς aor2 ptc δίδωμι.
ἀντί-λυτρον ransom.
μαρτύριον evidence, testimony, i.e. to what has just been stated (v.4).
καιροῖς ἰδίοις at the proper time (time ordained by God).

7 εἰς ὃ ἐτέθην ἐγὼ κῆρυξ καὶ ἀπόστολος, ἀλήθειαν λέγω οὐ ψεύδομαι, διδάσκαλος ἐθνῶν ἐν πίστει καὶ ἀληθείᾳ.
7 for which I was appointed a herald and an apostle—I am speaking the truth, I am not lyinga teacher of the Gentiles in faith and truth.

7 εἰς ὅ to/for which.
ἐ-τέθην I was made, aor. pass. τίθημι appoint.
κῆρυξ -υκος ὁ herald, preacher.
ψεύδομαι lie, tell an untruth.
διδάσκαλος teacher.

Max Zerwick and Mary Grosvenor, A Grammatical Analysis of the Greek New Testament (Rome: Biblical Institute Press, 1974-), 629.

The analysis is rather compact and brief, but it gives helpful information, including potentially difficult bits of parsing/declension and glosses. These can help when reading or when thinking through a passage. Also helpful is the separation of prefix (typically prepositional) and root; this can help one recognize a word that might otherwise be unfamiliar. Lastly, they give some help for irregular forms (e.g. κῆρυξ -υκος ὁ in v. 7).
Max & Mary don’t just do this for a book of the NT, or a particular author; they do it for the whole Greek New Testament. That means that anywhere you go in the New Testament—any passage you’re studying—you can get some help from Max & Mary.
While I am impressed with the helpful analysis, I think I’m most impressed by a few paragraphs in the preface (quoted below in their entirety) that discuss the reason the work exists, and the people it is intended to help:

But most important of all is the purpose to be served. It is hoped that this English revised edition in its turn will mean that the Greek text of the New Testament will not remain exclusively a tool on the desks of a decreasing number of specialists but will become a living power in the hands of theologians, of preachers of the Word, of directors of Bible discussion-circles, and finally in the hands of those who pray in private from the Word of God. This is the purpose to be served. May God bless everyone helping it.

The student who has little knowledge of Greek should bear in mind while using this book that it is by no means necessary to understand immediately everything explained in it. The principle of one thing at a time will serve him well. Many of the linguistic subtleties go beyond the needs of the beginner and are intended for the more advanced student, interested perhaps in the characteristics of Hellenistic Greek as contrasted with classical Greek.

A helpful feature of this work (and a justification of its size) is the fact that a student can begin using it at whatever point he likes, each chapter being self-sufficient and not presupposing explanations given in the previous chapters.

Max Zerwick and Mary Grosvenor, A Grammatical Analysis of the Greek New Testament (Rome: Biblical Institute Press, 1974-), iii–iv.

Introducing Deborah Mickens

Marketing has been very happy to incorporate some new talent from within the company. Deborah Mickens joins the marketing team after being an important part of our Customer Support team for two-and-a-half years.

When asked to write a blog to introduce myself, I thought, “where do I start”? I figured the best way to start would be to give a bit of history as to how I started working for Logos. In August of 2007, I decided to take a “leap of faith” and move from California where I had lived all my life and move to Bellingham, Washington to start working for Logos. For the first two and a half years, I worked for the Customer Support department and I am sure that I spoke to many of you while I worked in Customer Support. While in Customer Support, I was one of the ”People Behind the Product” interviewees. When the opportunity came up to work in the Marketing department, I figured this would be a good opportunity to try my hand at something new. My responsibilities include gathering and compiling information for the various Pre-Pubs that we post. The most recent Pre-Pubs I have worked on are

One of the best parts for working for Logos is the various cook-offs that occur at least 4 times a year. A couple months after I started working here, it was time for the Annual “Dessert Cook-off”. I decided it would be a fun opportunity to enter with my Butterscotch Eggnog Stars and see what it was like to participate in a Logos Cook-off. In preparation I baked somewhere around 150 cookies, it was a lot of work—but well worth it as my hard work paid off by being rewarded with a 3rd place finish. I have also participated in the 2008 & 2009 Chili Cook-off, the 2008 Bake-off and the 2010 Soup Cook-off. Another memorable part of my time at Logos was the summer of 2009 when four of my coworkers and I traveled to Eastern Washington to set up a fireworks show for the 4th of July. We had a great time setting up the show, and seeing how many people enjoyed the work we did. We are all looking forward to this year’s show!

The Logos Pre-Pub feature is a great way to get in on the “ground floor” of pricing for your favorite products! Be sure to take a look at what we have available!

The Father of Modern Revivalism: Charles Finney

Charles Finney

It is difficult to get an accurate view of Charles Finney’s evangelistic work. Various sources give wildly divergent numbers for conversions under Finney’s influence, one saying that between 1857 and 1858 Finney was directly or indirectly responsible for leading over 100,000 people to Christ. Regardless of the specific numbers, there is no question that Charles Grandison Finney was an influential figure in the Second Great Awakening.

Charles Finney was born, the youngest of fifteen children, on August 29, 1792 in Litchfield, Connecticut. He studied law, but his plans were altered when he underwent a dramatic conversion experience at the age of 29.

Finney became pastor of the Free Presbyterian Chatham Street Chapel and later the Broadway Tabernacle. He spoke as a refined and expert orator and became a widely popular evangelist, organizing and preaching at numerous revivals and meetings throughout New England. He also traveled to England. As many as one million people heard Finney preach throughout his career, and many of them underwent conversion experiences. Finney also spoke at length about social issues, and became an ardent abolitionist. In 1835, Finney was appointed as a professor of theology at Oberlin College, and became its president in 1851, where he remained until 1866. Charles Finney died on August 17, 1875.

Logos is now offering the Charles Finney Collection (6 Vols.). This collection includes his lectures on revival, systematic theology, addresses to professing Christians, a collection of his sermons, as well as his autobiography. That’s almost 3,000 pages by one of the 19th century’s most recognizable—and at times controversial—evangelists.

Other great offerings from important revivalists include The Works of Jonathan Edwards (2 Vols.), and Selected Sermons of George Whitefield both from the Great Awakening of the 18th century. Second Great Awakening period offerings include the Lyman Beecher Collection (4 Vols.), and the Welwyn Biography Series (8 Vols.) which features a 240 page biography of Pastor Asahel Nettleton, another luminary from the Second Great Awakening.

Remember, to keep your eye on the Pre-Pub page. If you are looking to add some books to your Logos resources, the prices you find on the Pre-Pub page are the lowest Logos will offer on these items!

Logos 4: Search While Typing

mp|seminars Tips

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos training seminars.

If you were a Libronix 3 user before moving up to Logos 4 you may have enjoyed a feature called Bible Speed Speech which automatically listed occurrences of your word or phrase even as you were typing. The good news is that the feature is in Logos 4; the name has just been changed to Search (while typing) Here’s how to use it:

  • Open the Search panel
  • Select Bible as the search type
  • Above the Find box click the drop down list called Search
  • Select Search (while typing) from the list
  • Select your desired passage range and Bible(s) from the other drop down lists
  • Type a word or phrase in the Find box
  • Notice the results are automatically displayed without clicking the Search arrow

Enjoy this automatic and instant concordance for any Bible in your Library!

Weekend Discount on Barth’s Church Dogmatics

Save nearly 32% off the retail price of Barth’s Church Dogmatics (14 Vols.)
- with the coupon code BARTHMATICS


Today’s guest post is from Johnny Cisneros, Product Manager for Systematic Theology, and co-instructor of Learn to Use Greek and Hebrew with Logos Bible Software.

In my last post, and the one before, I introduced you to Millard Erickson’s Christian Theology and Wolfhart Pannenberg’s Systematic Theology. I also mentioned that Pannenberg was a postdoctoral mentor to Erickson.

Who influenced Wolfhart Pannenberg? The answer is Karl Barth, the theologian whom Christianity Today calls “. . . one of the giants in the history of theology.” Pannenberg studied under Barth during his time at Basel (Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church, pg. 1222).

Barth is best known for his multi-volume theological work, Church Dogmatics. No matter where you stand on Barth, one would be hard-pressed to overstate the impact Barth’s Church Dogmatics had on 20th century theology.

Here’s an excerpt about Karl Barth from Who’s Who in Christian History:

“Barth’s greatest influence was theological, with his emphasis on God’s sovereignty placing him firmly in the Reformed (Calvinistic) tradition. He differed radically from the mainstream of continental European theology, rejecting both its subjective emphasis on religious experience and the prevalent idea that Christian doctrine is subject to, or limited by, its historical origins” (Who’s Who in Christian History, pg. 66).

Check out some of these comments about Church Dogmatics:

“One of the most notable theological publications of our time.” —Expository Times

“It is in the Church Dogmatics above all that we must look for the grandeur of this humble servant of Jesus Christ, for the work he was given to accomplish in it will endure to bless the world for many centuries to come.” —Thomas F. Torrance

“Only Athanasius, Augustine, Aquinas and Calvin have performed comparable service in the past, in the search for a unified and comprehensive basis for all theology in the grace of God.” —Thomas F. Torrance

“Among Barth’s many books, sermons and essays, the multivolume Church Dogmatics—a closely reasoned, eloquently stated argument in nearly ten thousand pages—stands out as the crown of his achievement.” —Clifford Blake Anderson

“His multi-volume Church Dogmatics (CD) constitutes the weightiest contribution to Protestant theology since Schleiermacher.” —T. A. Noble

“Barth’s Church Dogmatics is by far the most detailed Protestant exposition of Christian doctrine to have appeared since the Reformation.” —Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church

This week, two years ago, we released all fourteen volumes of Church Dogmatics for Logos Bible Software. We’re commemorating this anniversary by offering a this-weekend-only discount of almost 32% off of Church Dogmatics (14 Vols.). Simply use the coupon code BARTHMATICS during checkout to receive your discount!

Video Tutorial: Bible Reading Plan

Video Tutorial

Making sure that you provide yourself with regular time to read the Scriptures—or better yet, to let the Scriptures read you—is an important part of your daily walk. One of Logos’ goals is to ensure that you have the tools needed so your Bible reading doesn’t happen haphazardly. The Bible Reading Plan in Logos 4 is an important part of that toolbox.

Today’s video tutorial walks you through setting up your customizable reading plan. Once your reading plan is in place, it syncs across multiple platforms from your desktop, to your laptop, to your iPhone, even to Library.Logos.com. Staying on task in your Bible reading is within reach with the Bible Reading Plan.

Why Discourse Analysis Matters

Discourse Grammar of the Greek New Testament

Why does Paul sometimes say things like “I want you to know..”? Didn’t he want us to know everything he wrote?

Study of the Greek New Testament is too often limited to the words themselves, and not how the text hangs together as a whole. For years, Dr. Steve Runge has been incorporating the best research from linguists, translators, and biblical scholars to produce a suite of discourse-based resources from Logos Bible Software.

The newest addition is his Discourse Grammar of the Greek New Testament: A Practical Introduction for Teaching and Exegesis. This resource offers a book-length treatment of significant discourse devices and applies them to New Testament exegesis and interpretation. This book ships next week, so this is your last chance to get the discount while it’s on Pre-Pub!

Steve is also leading a 5-day Greek Discourse Workshop in Bellingham, Washington this summer. This workshop offers an unparalleled opportunity to learn how to apply this cutting-edge research very practically to your own exegesis. Space is limited, so you’ll need to register soon to reserve your spot.

A few days ago, Steve sat down to talk about the usefulness of discourse analysis for translating and interpreting the New Testament. This video describes the basics of discourse analysis and how it can be applied to the study of the Bible.

Remember, you have a little more time to register for the Greek Discourse Workshop. Space is limited, so reserve your spot now!

Free Greek and Hebrew Paradigm Charts

Greek and Hebrew Paradigm Charts

Have you ever been working through a Greek grammar and found yourself forgetting the ending for the first person singular pluperfect active indicative of a verb? Or translating a text where the meaning of the verse depends on the ending—and you’ve forgotten the ending?

If you’ve found yourself bogged down by rote memorization and you easily forget your Greek and Hebrew forms, these new Greek and Hebrew Paradigm Charts from Logos Bible Software can help.

They are useful for all levels of study—whether you’re a seminary student, or you simply want to refresh your memory from courses you may have taken years ago. Use them as handy reference guides while learning Greek and Hebrew.

The thick, glossy cardstock withstands your bags, folders, briefcases, backpacks, binders, notebooks, and whatever else you might store them in. They are clear and easy to read, and their 6×9 size makes them convenient enough to carry around with you to the library, the coffee shop, or wherever else you study.

You can order a 10-pack for only a dollar to share with your friends, or download the PDF right now for free!

These charts show you:

  • Endings for strong verbs: Qal, Niphal, Piel, Pual, Hiphil, Hophal, Hithpael
  • Endings for Hebrew nouns
  • Table of Hebrew numbers
  • Greek verb endings for indicative, subjunctive, imperative, infinitives, and participles in the active, middle, and passive voices
  • Declensions of nouns, including articles, pronouns, and indefinite pronouns

Greek and Hebrew Paradigm Charts are perfect for first- and second-year Greek and Hebrew students, and essential for anyone learning Greek or Hebrew on their own. Check out the product page to learn more.

Mobile Users, We Want Your Feedback!

Logos Bible Software MobileWe asked for your input over a year ago into what sorts of mobile devices you were using. From that feedback we developed the free Logos iPhone app. It has been a great success! Just this week alone, the app was used over 100,000 times as a mobile Bible study aid. Once again, we are considering the next frontier.

“What about Logos on my Blackberry? Android? Windows Mobile?”

We have promoted the iPhone app often since it was launched it November and we have received the same responses every time, “What about Logos on my Blackberry? Android? Windows Mobile?”

We hear you! There is no shortage of mobile platforms out there and we are currently researching options—but we could use your help. We would like to hear about the mobile platforms you use or plan on using in the near future. Take a moment and take this brief survey.

When you have filled out the survey, head over to the forum where you can discuss your feedback with other Logos users.

The Pastor’s Pastor: Richard Baxter

RIchardBaxter

One of the gems on Pre-Pub right now is The Practical Works of the Rev. Richard Baxter (23 Vols.), an exhaustive collection from a man that has influenced luminaries like J. I. Packer, John Piper, and Charles Spurgeon.

Richard Baxter desired a life of quiet obedience but always seemed to find himself at the center of controversy. Ordained into the Church of England in the early 17th century, Baxter—while being drawn toward the growing Puritan movement—tried to avoid the increasing disputes between the Anglican church and the voices crying out for reform. As tensions increased and schisms seemed to be erupting at every turn, Baxter could often be heard encouraging charity among disparate factions.

Baxter’s desire for unity should not be confused for a lack of strong conviction. He was a man with a strong resolve and a sensitive conscience. Although he often was the voice of reason between two extremes, Baxter’s resolve and sensitivity to God’s will often inflamed those on both sides.

He was imprisoned for running a conventicle. This small group which Baxter assembled to have intimate religious discussions was frowned upon as a possible inroad for schismatic theology and practice. His credentials allowing him to preach were withdrawn after he refused the bishopric of Hereford, having issues with the church’s episcopacy. Persecution followed Baxter everywhere. Eventually he was imprisoned for a year and a half and was forced to sell two extensive libraries to pay for fees and penalties.

Despite his legal woes, Baxter’s The Saint’s Everlasting Rest—written during a severe bout with tuberculosis—became one of the mostly widely read books of the 17th century. John Wesley often quoted Richard Baxter’s works in his sermons and writings and even produced an abridged version of The Saint’s Everlasting Rest in 1754.

The Practical Works of the Rev. Richard Baxter (23 Vols.) includes the treatises, sermons, and works of one of Puritan England’s most prolific writers and influential preachers all in one place. This means that not only do you get The Saint’s Everlasting Rest, but you get twenty-one other impressive works, including the timeless classic on pastoral ministry The Reformed Pastor.

Methodist apostle Francis Asbury wrote in his diary in 1810, “O what a prize: Baxter’s Reformed Pastor fell into my hands this morning.” And John Angell James, minister of Carr’s Lane, Birmingham wrote, “I have made, next to the Bible, Baxter’s Reformed Pastor my rule as regards the object of my ministry. It were well if that volume were often read by all our pastors.”

Don’t miss an opportunity to pick up this collection at the best price available now!