Logos 4: Project Logos on the Big Screen

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Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos training seminars.

As an owner of Logos Bible Software 4, I’m sure you’re continuing to improve your mastery of this incredible tool for your personal Bible study. I hope also, if you’re a teacher or pastor, that you find ways to utilize the program in public teaching situations. With a laptop and projector you can utilize your electronic library right in the classroom. Here’s a little trick to help your students better see Logos when it’s projected:

  • Choose Tools | Program Settings
  • Under Accessibility increase the percentage of Program Scaling

Now everything in the program including icons, menus, guides, tools, and more, are enlarged for easier viewing. Your students will thank you for this little tweak in the program. This tip also comes in handy for those late nights of study when your eyes are tired!

An Interview with John Bolt about Herman Bavinck, Part 2

John Bolt

Last week, we featured the first part of an interview with John Bolt, the editor of the new translation of Herman Bavinck’s Reformed Dogmatics. Dr. Bolt is Professor of Systematic Theology at Calvin Theological Seminary and has served as a pastor for several years. He is a member of the Dutch Translation Society, which produced the new translation. Part two of the interview with John Bolt is below.

Herman Bavinck’s theology is closely associated with Abraham Kuyper’s theology. How does Bavinck relate to Kuyper and other prominent contemporaries? What makes him distinct from Kuyper?

Kuyper was the movement leader in the renaissance of Calvinism that helped reform the church and also led the orthodox Reformed people of the Netherlands to become a cultural, social, and political force in the late nineteenth and twentieth century. Bavinck’s writing, speaking, and practice fully supported this movement but his major contribution was that of a scholar whose theological and church work became the font of most of the developments in the Dutch Reformed churches of the 20th century. Kuyper was a dynamic, sometimes overbearing, and never-in-doubt commander of an army; Bavinck was a modest, even shy retiring man who strove to find the positive in an opponent’s point of view in order to incorporate it into his own.

Reformed Dogmatics

The publication of the new translation of Bavinck’s Reformed Dogmatics has received favorable reviews from prominent Reformed theologians and historians around the world. The electronic edition Logos Bible Software is currently working on has attracted lots of attention. We get questions every week from anxious customers who are anticipating the completion of this project. Why have we seen such a renewed interest in Bavinck in the past few years?

Because he’s good! Seriously.

The last few years have also seen a renewed interest in Reformed theology more broadly. What are your thoughts on this movement? What is the future of the Reformed Resurgence?

I love reading these guys because they are edgy, funny, and straightforward. Calvin will always be relevant because even secular people can’t ignore his importance. Nonetheless, the Reformed (Calvinist) faith is a confessional faith (tied to an ecclesiastical tradition) and in spite of the occasional flashes of interest that we see right now, the fact remains that confessional Christianity has a terrible time in America’s overwhelmingly voluntarist religious ethos.

In addition to the two decades you’ve spent as a professor of systematic theology, you have also served as a pastor in two churches, and you continue to preach and teach regularly. Why is it important for pastors to read Bavinck? What is the significance of Reformed Dogmatics for pastoral ministry today?

As a scholar Bavinck has of course become the hub of the wheel around which I work—my scholarly work has been Bavinck and more Bavinck. But that’s only the formal part. More importantly, the content of Bavinck’s thought and the method of his theology have also deeply shaped me. Bavinck had an deeply sensitive eye for the revelation of God in the created world and in the providential guidance of human history and cultures. He sees deeply how the human quest for forgiveness, for meaning, for reconciliation, and for truth are part of our being created in God’s image and therefore perennially present in all the religious quests of human beings.

Remember, you still have a little more time to get Reformed Dogmatics while it’s on Pre-Pub. The print set normally retails for $179.95, but right now you can pre-order it for $99.95. This set ships in just a couple weeks, so you still have a little more time left to get this deal when you pre-order. Lock in your order now!

The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church

Oxford Dictionary of the Christian ChurchOne of the great benefits of the Logos 4 libraries is serendipity. Here specifically I’m thinking of finding books in your library that you didn’t really know you had, but once you find them you’re so glad you’ve got ‘em you don’t know how you studied without them.
For me, one of these wow-I’m-glad-I-found-it books is the Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church (ODCC). It comes in the Scholar’s LE, Silver LE, Gold LE, Platinum LE and Portfolio LE libraries for Logos Bible Software.
And the ODCC is a gem. Clearly written. Top-notch scholarship. Recent. Relevant. Almost 2000 pages of excellent reference material that covers a wide array of topics and ideas. The ODCC is simply stunning.
One of my newfound roles here at Logos is that of columnist, where I’m responsible for the Thoughts from the Church Fathers column for Bible Study Magazine. As I work on each new column, the patristic entries in ODCC have been very helpful. They provide a great introductory sketch both of familiar figures (e.g. Augustine) and figures you might never have heard of (e.g. Cyril of Jerusalem). They lay out the contour and timeline while highlighting major issues, typically with links to entries describing these issues or debates. It’s like a one-stop shopping trip, and it is awesome.
But the patristic entries (while my favorite) are only one aspect of the ODCC. There is all sorts of stuff in it: Theology, Patristic scholarship, Churches and denominations, Church calendar and organization, Biographical entries, and more.
If you’ve got ODCC (just fire up Logos 4 and type ‘ODCC’ in the command box or in the Library to see if you have it already), then you owe it to yourself to check it out and look at some articles the next time you’re working on something (especially if you see any reference to particular church fathers).
If you don’t have ODCC, then you should check it out and, if the time is right, add it to your library. Or compare the cost of buying ODCC outright ($150 retail) with the cost to upgrade to at least Scholar’s LE. If your upgrade cost is close to (or under) $150, and you don’t have ODCC, then you could really end up getting a great deal on the upgrade — ODCC plus whatever else is in Scholar’s LE that you don’t already have.
Update: In the comments, it is noted that the 3rd edition of ODCC (from 1997) has been republished in paperback by another publisher. The edition in Logos Bible Software is the 2005 revision of the 3rd edition, which has some significant differences from the third edition. Below is an excerpt from the Note on the Revision of the Third Edition in the front matter of the 2005 edition:

The revision of the third edition was planned as a modest exercise, designed to incorporate changes which would not fit into successive reprintings and to include some updating wanted for a projected online version. The original pagination was to be preserved, and a limited number of short new articles were to come at the end. Until after production had been put in hand, I expected the pagination to be generally retained and I worked within this constraint. Nevertheless, the scope of the revision widened and I made a large number of small changes to reflect events and shifts in scholarly opinion over the last eight years or so, juggling with the text to fit in the new material. In some cases I commissioned completely new articles, impressing on their authors that they must be of the same length as the material they replaced. Inevitably, however, the main changes are in the bibliographies.

F. L. Cross and Elizabeth A. Livingstone, The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church (3rd ed. rev.; Oxford; New York: Oxford University Press, 2005), ix.

Video Tutorial: Biblical Places – Dynamic Maps

Video Tutorial

One phenomenal feature of Biblical Places is the capturing of actual geographic coordinates for as many biblical locations as possible. As you place your mouse over different areas of the maps in Biblical Places, you can actually see the exact longitude and latitude in the upper right hand corner. A simple click on the provided link and you can see those coordinates as they exist now in Google Maps!

Another great feature in Biblical Places is the ability to measure distances by pressing Ctrl and left clicking/dragging from one place on the map to another.

Biblical Places really opens up the geography of the biblical world to you. No longer is your biblical atlas a tool that you interact with passively, but it is powerful tool that you can manipulate and control to grasp the significance geography plays in biblical events.

Logos Bible College Scholarship

Several months ago we created a Seminary Scholarship site, offering 3 seminary students per year a $1,000.00 tuition scholarship and a copy of Scholar’s Library. Upon launching it, we received numerous requests to start a similar program for those students attending a Bible College.
I’m happy to announce that, today, we’re launching a Bible College Scholarship program!
If you attend a Bible College or Christian Undergraduate University, then this scholarship is for you. Three times a year we’ll be giving away a $1,000.00 tuition scholarship plus a copy of Logos Scholar’s Library. The application process is simple, and takes less than 15 minutes to complete. So head over and apply now.

Sharing is Caring

With most scholarships, you typically don’t want to tell your friends about it because the more applicants there are, the less chance you have of winning. With our Bible College Scholarship, the exact opposite is true. The more of your friends who apply, the greater chance you have of being awarded the scholarship!
Everyone who fills out an application is asked how they heard about the scholarship. If a person puts your name in as the one who referred them to the site and they win the scholarship, then we’ll give you the scholarship too!
Not only do you have the chance to win a great Bible College Scholarship, you can help others win it too!

Not a Bible College Student? We Need Your Help

The only way we can continue this scholarship program is if you help us spread the word about it. Please take a moment and share about the scholarship on Facebook and Twitter. Also, if you know any Bible College students personally, please send them an email or give them a call to let them know about this great opportunity.

Logos 4: Locate Occurrences of an Original Word or Strong’s Number

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Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos training seminars.

I have received numerous e-mails asking, “Where is the Englishman’s Concordance in Logos 4?” Just to be sure you know what I’m referring to, the Englishman’s Concordance was a special search feature in Libronix 3 that located every occurrence of a Strong’s number (which represented a Hebrew or Greek word) in the Bible.

So if you have been wondering this yourself, here is the answer: the name Englishman’s Concordance does not appear in Logos 4, but the functionality does:

  • Open a Bible with the reverse interlinear option (currently ESV, NRSV, KJV, NKJKV, NASB, and NLT)
  • Right click on a word in a verse
  • From the right menu, select Lemma “your word” OR Strong’s “your number”
  • Select Search this resource

There before your eyes will be every occurrence of that word or number! When doing word studies, this is a valuable search so that you can compare Scripture with Scripture.

An Interview with John Bolt about Herman Bavinck

John Bolt

The electronic edition of Reformed Dogmatics, by Herman Bavinck is nearing completion on the Pre-Pub page, so I thought I thought I’d take this opportunity to share an email exchange I recently had with Dr. John Bolt, the editor of the new English translation. Dr. Bolt is Professor of Systematic Theology at Calvin Theological Seminary and has served as a pastor for several years. He is a member of the Dutch Translation Society, which produced the new translation. Part one is below, and part two will appear on the blog next week.

Remember, you still have a little more time to get Bavinck’s Reformed Dogmatics, so head on over to the Pre-Pub page to place your order!

Who was Herman Bavinck?

Herman Bavinck was the son of Jan Bavinck, a preacher in the Dutch Reformed Succession Churches, a fellowship characterized by deep piety, practical Christianity, and traditional orthodox Reformed theology.

He was an extraordinarily gifted student who scandalized his own church by attending the very modern theological faculty at the University of Leiden where he earned a doctorate, writing a dissertation on the ethics of Swiss Reformer Ulrich Zwingli. As a student he became familiar with the work of Abraham Kuyper, the church reformer, journalist, statesman, who dominated Dutch life in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century.

Both men taught theology—Kuyper at the Free University of Amsterdam, and Bavinck at the Kampen theological school of the Secession church and from 1902 on as Kuyper’s successor at the Free University. While Bavinck did public service in the First Chamber (Senate) of the Dutch Parliament, he was the “theologian’s theologian” for the Dutch neo-Calvinist movement. His major work, Reformed Dogmatics, is remarkable for its solid biblical base, its incorporation of the church’s long history of biblical interpretation and dogma formation, and its constant address to modern questions in the natural sciences and in the new field of psychology.

What is the mission and role of the Dutch Translation Society in translating the works of Bavinck and other theologians?

Truthfully, Bavinck was the only one of sufficient importance to warrant translating his entire 4-volume magnum opus. One cannot understand the developments in Dutch Reformed theology of the twentieth century (Berkouwer, Van Ruler, Hendrikus Berkhof, and others) apart from a first hand acquaintance with Bavinck.

He is still fresh and relevant because he takes seriously the intellectual and social challenges of modernity. Many of the questions of his day in Europe still haunt us today and he provides a sure guide.

Our translation society is a truly ecumenical venture that draws support from at least five different churches in the Reformed tradition. Bavinck is one of the few figures to which all of those traditions turn for guidance.

Reformed Dogmatics

The translation project took a decade to complete. Can you describe the process? What was your role in the translation and editorial process?

When we started the project, we had enough money to do a segment of Reformed Dogmatics. Though we were all enthusiastic about the translation, we really did not know if the work would sell. So we started modestly. We began with the eschatology section in volume 4 because of its size and the currency of its subject matter. The result: The Last Things: Hope for this World and the Next, first published by Baker in 1996.

The volume was well-received. We had generous benefactors, and next produced the creation section of Volume 2: In the Beginning: Foundations of Creation Theology, which Baker published in 1999.

At that point support was growing sufficiently for us to commit to doing the entire four volumes. The last one was published in 2008. John Vriend was the translator of the text. I received the typed manuscripts as he completed his work, and I went to work editing.

My editorial work consisted of bringing the scholarly apparatus up to speed to twenty-first century standards. This meant getting the full bibliographic information, checking versions and editions, and—where possible—substituting the English text (eg. Schleiermacher’s Christian Faith) where Bavinck had cited the Dutch or German.

I am deeply indebted to the list of Calvin Seminary students whose names are listed at the beginning of the bibliographies in each volume. They checked editions, found obscure periodicals, and more. My final editorial work was to provide sub-headings internal to each chapter, where they were completely absent in the original, and to prepare a précis for each chapter to help readers navigate lengthy arguments.

You write in the introduction to Bavinck’s Prolegomena in volume 1 that “the Gereformeerd Dogmatiek represents the concluding high point of some four centuries of remarkably productive Dutch Reformed theological reflection,” including “Voetius, De Moor, Vitringa, van Mastricht, Witsius, and Walaeus.” How does Bavinck both reflect and develop the theological system of his predecessors?

All you have to do is look at the footnotes in the Reformed Dogmatics to see how well Bavinck knew that tradition and used it. Nonetheless, he excels them in his desire to reach out to the universal religious impulse in all people in order to connect it with the specific Christian gospel. If you look at any of the loci you will see how he often begins with, let’s say, “sacrifice” as a general human religious reality, and moves from there to Christian revelation. It is that move which marks him as a truly modern theologian, interested in and addressing modern questions.

The remainder of the interview will appear on the blog next week. Remember, you still have a little more time to get Reformed Dogmatics while it’s on Pre-Pub. The print set normally retails for $179.95, but right now you can pre-order it for $99.95. We plan on shipping this set very soon, so you still have a little more time left to get this deal when you pre-order. Lock in your order now!

The “Network Effect”

AlexanderGrahamBellI would love to have been there when Alexander Graham Bell experienced his great “a-ha” moments. His first “a-ha” might have gone something like this, “Oh no. . . I gotta make two of these things!” Can you then picture Al showing off the first pair of telephones to friends and dignitaries who ask the questions, “Do you have to have two phones and a different set of wires for each person you speak to? Where are you going to run the wires? What do you mean, ‘switchboard’?”

Recently I was speaking with a friend who likened Logos Bible Software to the Amazon Kindle and the Sony e-Reader. His point was that we all represented similar abilities to read digital books. Our new iPhone app reinforced his analogy. I pointed out that his perspective was only true to a point. E-book readers have much in common with printed books: They are convenient, hand-held, self-contained, and portable. They are little more than a book that runs on batteries. They go beyond the printed book by serving as vending machines for additional books. But while they have some endearing features, they still only represent basic paper book utility: reading words on pages. With Logos Bible Software, reading words on pages is just the beginning.

Just as the utility of a telephone increases relative to the number of other telephones it is connected to, the value of each Logos book increases relative to the number of books and data sets it references. Logos books are worth more than 100% of the paper book utility. The quantity and quality of explicitly “tagged” links along with word, phrase, topic, and reference links and the sheer size of the Logos Bible Software formatted book count create a network effect dramatically superior to the utility of any individual or collection of stand-alone digital books. Stand-alone digital books are the raw ingredients of Logos Bible Software, not the end product.

A commentary linked to a Bible, linked to a dictionary, linked to an atlas, linked to each of the other books in the library offers a multiplier network effect to the value of every single book. Every combination of books is greater than the sum of the books. The network effect is seen clearly in telephones, radio, TV, Facebook, the human genome, and yes, Logos Bible Software.

One way of measuring this network effect is Metcalfe’s law:

Metcalfe’s law states that the value of a telecommunications network is proportional to the square of the number of connected users of the system (n2). . . . Metcalfe’s law characterizes many of the network effects of communication technologies and networks such as the Internet, social networking, and the World Wide Web.

And I would suggest it also applies to linked books in the Logos Bible Software.

Let x equal the value of one book. Linked together in a network,

  • Two books = 4x
  • Three books = 9x
  • Four books = 16x

A thousand–volume Logos Bible Software Library has the utility of a million stand-alone resources and the convenience of your desktop, laptop, or your iPhone/iPad!

Logos 4.0c Is Now Available

It’s been six months since we shipped Logos 4, and today we’re releasing our third significant update to the Windows software. Version 4.0c, which will be available later today as a free download, brings many new features and improvements and fixes lots of little bugs. If you have automatic updating enabled (screenshot), which is the default setting, Logos 4 will notify you that updates are ready to be installed.

When you see the balloon tooltip window, right-click on the Logos icon in your system tray and choose to “Install update” (screenshot). If Logos 4 hasn’t downloaded the update by the end of the day and you just can’t wait any longer to get your hands on the latest release, type Update Now into the command bar (screenshot). This will force Logos 4 to check for any available updates (screenshot) and begin downloading them.

What’s New in 4.0c?

There are hundreds of changes in 4.0c. Here are the two biggest ones:

  1. Legacy Reverse Interlinear Display: In Logos 4 we introduced a new layout for reverse interlinears. Most of you loved it, but some preferred the previous layout where the Greek or Hebrew text was directly below the English text. So we’ve decided to add it back in as an option (screenshot). Just click on “Display” and choose which lines you’d like to appear. You can use it along with or instead of the new-style reverse interlinear display.
  2. Passage Lists: Save your Bible search results as Passage Lists, which were called Verse Lists in version 3 (screenshot). There’s also a command to import Passage Lists from version 3 into version 4. Use “Import Passage Lists” to import just the Passage Lists, or use “Import All” to import Passage Lists, Highlighting, Notes, Favorites, and Prayer Lists. One cool new feature of Passage Lists in version 4 is that you can merge lists to get the union, intersection, difference, or symmetric difference or multiple lists.

To see a complete list of the changes in 4.0c, check out the support article “What’s New in Logos 4.0c.”

Time to Upgrade to Logos 4?

If you’ve been cautiously watching from the sidelines, waiting for the right opportunity to make the switch to Logos 4, now’s your chance. Logos 4 is better than ever. It’s had more than six months of extensive testing by thousands of users, and our team of developers has been fixing bugs, listening to user feedback, and adding some really cool new features.

There’s a lot more still planned. Version 4.0d is already underway, and we’re in the process of adding these additional features, as well as many others that we can’t tell you about yet.

There’s never been a better time to upgrade to Logos 4. It’s a powerful, stable, cutting-edge piece of software that just keeps getting better and better. Best of all, these regular updates don’t cost you a penny.

What about Logos 4 for Mac?

Progress on the Mac version of Logos 4 recently has been impressive. As Alpha 19.1 shows, it’s coming along quite nicely. We’ve doubled the size of our Mac development team, and they’re really cranking out new features at a fast pace. The consensus is that Logos 4 for Mac as an alpha is better than our previous generation software. So if you haven’t tried it yet, now might be a good time. Remember, you can safely use both Logos for Mac 1.2.2 and Logos 4 for Mac side by side. If you’re ready to help us test it, you can either upgrade your base package or download the core engine and start contributing in the Logos 4 for Mac forum.

Why the Göttingen Is the Most Important LXX Ever Published

Göttingen Septuagint

The Göttingen Septuagint represents the largest Septuagint project ever undertaken. Published between 1931 and 2006, the 24-volume Göttingen Septuagint contains the most authoritative critical apparatus of the Greek Old Testament ever assembled.

Combining textual evidence from countless manuscripts and ancient sources—including Philo, Josephus, and the Greek Church Fathers—the Göttingen Septuagint is the most detailed and elaborate critical edition of the Septuagint ever published.

The Göttingen Septuagint is the fruit of seven decades of research and publication work. Alfred Rahlfs began the project in the 1920s, and published the volumes on Genesis and Psalms before his death in 1935. William Kappler worked on the Maccabeus volumes before his death in 1944, and Robert Hanhart finished the volume on II Maccabeus and completed III Maccabeus in 1960. Between 1939 and 1957, Joseph Ziegler labored on the books of the prophets, as well as Ieremias-Baruch-Threni-Epistula Ieremiae, Sapientia Salomonis, and Ecclesiasticus.

At Logos Bible Software, we’re committed to promoting Septuagint scholarship and building tools and resources for effective research and study of the Septuagint. Now, we’re thrilled to announce that the Göttingen Septuagint is ready to go into development. Even though we don’t have quite enough orders to cover costs, this resource is simply too important for Septuagint scholarship to wait any longer.

Once this goes under development the price will jump, so you still have a few more days to lock in your order at the current price.

To give you an idea of how good a deal this is, remember that a print version would set you back over $3,000.00. Other digital editions cost $400.00 for just the Pentateuch. That makes pre-ordering the entire Göttingen Septuagint for $299.95 from Logos the right choice. That’s an amazing deal on 65 resources in 24 volumes!

Remember, when this goes into development in a few days, the Pre-Pub price will jump. But if you lock in your order now at $299.95, that’s the price you’ll pay for the entire Göttingen Septuagint on the day it ships.

If you’re interested in the Septuagint, you might also want to take a peek at Biblical Languages: Reference Grammars and Introductions (19 Vols.), which contains Thackeray’s Grammar of the Old Testament in Greek, Conybeare and Stock’s Grammar of Septuagint Greek, and Swete’s Introduction to the Old Testament in Greek.