Why Discourse Analysis Matters

Discourse Grammar of the Greek New Testament

Why does Paul sometimes say things like “I want you to know..”? Didn’t he want us to know everything he wrote?

Study of the Greek New Testament is too often limited to the words themselves, and not how the text hangs together as a whole. For years, Dr. Steve Runge has been incorporating the best research from linguists, translators, and biblical scholars to produce a suite of discourse-based resources from Logos Bible Software.

The newest addition is his Discourse Grammar of the Greek New Testament: A Practical Introduction for Teaching and Exegesis. This resource offers a book-length treatment of significant discourse devices and applies them to New Testament exegesis and interpretation. This book ships next week, so this is your last chance to get the discount while it’s on Pre-Pub!

Steve is also leading a 5-day Greek Discourse Workshop in Bellingham, Washington this summer. This workshop offers an unparalleled opportunity to learn how to apply this cutting-edge research very practically to your own exegesis. Space is limited, so you’ll need to register soon to reserve your spot.

A few days ago, Steve sat down to talk about the usefulness of discourse analysis for translating and interpreting the New Testament. This video describes the basics of discourse analysis and how it can be applied to the study of the Bible.

Remember, you have a little more time to register for the Greek Discourse Workshop. Space is limited, so reserve your spot now!

Free Greek and Hebrew Paradigm Charts

Greek and Hebrew Paradigm Charts

Have you ever been working through a Greek grammar and found yourself forgetting the ending for the first person singular pluperfect active indicative of a verb? Or translating a text where the meaning of the verse depends on the ending—and you’ve forgotten the ending?

If you’ve found yourself bogged down by rote memorization and you easily forget your Greek and Hebrew forms, these new Greek and Hebrew Paradigm Charts from Logos Bible Software can help.

They are useful for all levels of study—whether you’re a seminary student, or you simply want to refresh your memory from courses you may have taken years ago. Use them as handy reference guides while learning Greek and Hebrew.

The thick, glossy cardstock withstands your bags, folders, briefcases, backpacks, binders, notebooks, and whatever else you might store them in. They are clear and easy to read, and their 6×9 size makes them convenient enough to carry around with you to the library, the coffee shop, or wherever else you study.

You can order a 10-pack for only a dollar to share with your friends, or download the PDF right now for free!

These charts show you:

  • Endings for strong verbs: Qal, Niphal, Piel, Pual, Hiphil, Hophal, Hithpael
  • Endings for Hebrew nouns
  • Table of Hebrew numbers
  • Greek verb endings for indicative, subjunctive, imperative, infinitives, and participles in the active, middle, and passive voices
  • Declensions of nouns, including articles, pronouns, and indefinite pronouns

Greek and Hebrew Paradigm Charts are perfect for first- and second-year Greek and Hebrew students, and essential for anyone learning Greek or Hebrew on their own. Check out the product page to learn more.

Mobile Users, We Want Your Feedback!

Logos Bible Software MobileWe asked for your input over a year ago into what sorts of mobile devices you were using. From that feedback we developed the free Logos iPhone app. It has been a great success! Just this week alone, the app was used over 100,000 times as a mobile Bible study aid. Once again, we are considering the next frontier.

“What about Logos on my Blackberry? Android? Windows Mobile?”

We have promoted the iPhone app often since it was launched it November and we have received the same responses every time, “What about Logos on my Blackberry? Android? Windows Mobile?”

We hear you! There is no shortage of mobile platforms out there and we are currently researching options—but we could use your help. We would like to hear about the mobile platforms you use or plan on using in the near future. Take a moment and take this brief survey.

When you have filled out the survey, head over to the forum where you can discuss your feedback with other Logos users.

The Pastor’s Pastor: Richard Baxter

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One of the gems on Pre-Pub right now is The Practical Works of the Rev. Richard Baxter (23 Vols.), an exhaustive collection from a man that has influenced luminaries like J. I. Packer, John Piper, and Charles Spurgeon.

Richard Baxter desired a life of quiet obedience but always seemed to find himself at the center of controversy. Ordained into the Church of England in the early 17th century, Baxter—while being drawn toward the growing Puritan movement—tried to avoid the increasing disputes between the Anglican church and the voices crying out for reform. As tensions increased and schisms seemed to be erupting at every turn, Baxter could often be heard encouraging charity among disparate factions.

Baxter’s desire for unity should not be confused for a lack of strong conviction. He was a man with a strong resolve and a sensitive conscience. Although he often was the voice of reason between two extremes, Baxter’s resolve and sensitivity to God’s will often inflamed those on both sides.

He was imprisoned for running a conventicle. This small group which Baxter assembled to have intimate religious discussions was frowned upon as a possible inroad for schismatic theology and practice. His credentials allowing him to preach were withdrawn after he refused the bishopric of Hereford, having issues with the church’s episcopacy. Persecution followed Baxter everywhere. Eventually he was imprisoned for a year and a half and was forced to sell two extensive libraries to pay for fees and penalties.

Despite his legal woes, Baxter’s The Saint’s Everlasting Rest—written during a severe bout with tuberculosis—became one of the mostly widely read books of the 17th century. John Wesley often quoted Richard Baxter’s works in his sermons and writings and even produced an abridged version of The Saint’s Everlasting Rest in 1754.

The Practical Works of the Rev. Richard Baxter (23 Vols.) includes the treatises, sermons, and works of one of Puritan England’s most prolific writers and influential preachers all in one place. This means that not only do you get The Saint’s Everlasting Rest, but you get twenty-one other impressive works, including the timeless classic on pastoral ministry The Reformed Pastor.

Methodist apostle Francis Asbury wrote in his diary in 1810, “O what a prize: Baxter’s Reformed Pastor fell into my hands this morning.” And John Angell James, minister of Carr’s Lane, Birmingham wrote, “I have made, next to the Bible, Baxter’s Reformed Pastor my rule as regards the object of my ministry. It were well if that volume were often read by all our pastors.”

Don’t miss an opportunity to pick up this collection at the best price available now!

Logos 4: Place Menu Features on the Shortcuts Bar

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Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos training seminars.

Do you find yourself going to same menu to open the same feature over and over again? If so, then you may want to take advantage of the Shortcuts bar, the empty section just to the right of the Command bar. There you can place icons to quickly open your favorite Logos features. Here’s all you do:

  • Choose one of the menus
  • Drag and drop a feature from the menu to the Shortcuts bar
  • Logos will automatically place an icon on the Shortcuts bar

Now just click the icon to open that feature!

Wolfhart? What Kind of Name is Wolfhart?!

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Today’s guest post is from Johnny Cisneros, Product Manager for Systematic Theology, and co-instructor of Learn to Use Greek and Hebrew with Logos Bible Software.

In a previous blog post, I mentioned a theologian that influenced Millard J. Erickson—that theologian is Wolfhart Pannenberg. He was Erickson’s postdoctoral mentor. In fact, Pannenberg was one of the three people to whom Erickson dedicated his book, Christian Theology.

You may never have heard of Wolfhart Pannenberg, which is a tragedy, because his theological influence is monumental.

But who was Pannenberg? The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church says this about him:

“[Wolfhart Pannenberg is a] German Protestant theologian. In 1950/51 he studied theology under K. Barth in Basle, proceeding to doctoral work in Heidelberg in 1951. During his Heidelberg years he co-operated with a group of younger theologians in the development of a new approach, both exegetical and systematic, to the theology of revelation. This led to the book, Offenbarung als Geschichte, ed. by Pannenberg (1961; Eng. tr., Revelation as History, 1968). After teaching appointments in Wuppertal and Mainz, in 1968 he became Professor of Systematic Theology in the Protestant Faculty at Munich, where he remained until he retired in 1993)” (The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church, page 1222).

Pannenberg is best known for this three-volume work, Systematic Theology. One scholar says that in Systematic Theology Pannenberg offers “a voluminous account of every question before offering his own construction. Thus one may count on him for thorough background to most any debate, or one may move directly to the end of the section for Pannenberg’s own argument” (The Dictionary of Historical Theology, page 420). In other words, if you want to get into theology, you need Pannenberg.

Pannenberg also wrote: Anthropology in Theological Perspective, which is also available in the Science and Theology Collection (9 Vols.).

For an introduction to the theology of Pannenberg see God and the Future: Wolfhart Pannenberg’s Eschatological Doctrine of God, which is also part of the Theology and Doctrine Collection (16 Vols.).

Pannenberg is also regularly cited when God’s revelation to us is discussed. For an overview of Pannenberg’s view of divine revelation, check out God, Revelation, and Authority (6 Vols.) by Carl F. Henry, which is included in Gold, Platinum, and Portfolio.

Video Tutorial: The Home Page Passage Box

Video Tutorial

For years, Logos Bible Software has been providing Bible Software that makes studying the Bible as easy as entering a passage and clicking “Go!” Whether you are looking for insights into a verse, a biblical character, or a topic Bible study in Logos 4 is just that simple.

In today’s tutorial video, Morris Proctor shows you just how easy it is to find what you are looking for with the Home Page Passage Box.

Remember that you can access and watch tutorial videos anytime. You will be surprised at just how much more productive your Bible study can be by just investing time in these training tidbits.

The Resurrected Servant in Isaiah

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Today’s guest post is from John Barry, Editor-in-Chief of Bible Study Magazine.

Over the centuries, much ink has been spilled interpreting the book of Isaiah—a good portion of this on Isaiah 52:13–53:12. The servant in Isaiah is one of the most intriguing figures in the prophetic Scriptures. The questions about this passage are many, the interpretations are diverse, and the answers always seem to be different. Some have looked to Isaiah 52 and 53 in search of Jesus, others to reclaim Israel’s role in the world, and some to find a historical explanation for this prophetic text that seems to have no precedence.

A scholar friend of mine once remarked, “I must confess: if there is anything that convinces me that the Bible is inspired, and from God, it is Isaiah 53.” Isaiah 52:13–53:12 comes out of nowhere. There is no precedent for an innocent servant of God suffering and dying for the iniquities of others. It is shocking, graphic and brutal, yet profound.

In the past thirty years, there has been little examination of the servant’s possible resurrection in Isaiah 53:10–12. Two scholastic interpretations have been cited as disproving the resurrection in Isaiah 53. Even though these interpretations have been cited multiple times as disproving resurrection in Isaiah 53:10–12, discourse analysis, a method that has been pioneered since these scholastic works were written, suggests otherwise. My book—now available on Pre-Pub with Logos—The Resurrected Servant in Isaiah, re-evaluates the scholarly consensus about the resurrected servant and proposes a new interpretation.

Learn about the resurrected servant prophesied 500 years before Jesus came on the scene. Learn about the prophecy that foretold a servant who would reconcile God’s people to him and restore them to their land. Learn how the resurrection of God’s servant means resurrection—metaphorically and physically—for God’s people.

Here’s what scholars are saying about it:

“John Barry’s exegesis of Isaiah 52:13­-53:12, a crucial text for Christian apologetics, is brilliant: well researched and cogently argued. Step by step he convincingly demonstrates that the prophet proclaims to the Babylonian exiles an individual servant who offers his life as a sin offering and is raised from the dead. His book will be my first port of call when studying this great text.”—Bruce Waltke, Professor of Old Testament, Reformed Theological Seminary and co-author of An Introduction to Biblical Hebrew Syntax and An Old Testament Theology

“John Barry makes an intriguing and appealing case that the mysterious ‘suffering servant’ in Isaiah fulfills his vocation through resurrection. . . .”
—Christopher R. Smith, author of After Chapters and Verses and consulting editor of The Books of The Bible: A Presentation of Today’s New International Version

“In The Resurrected Servant, Barry provides a detailed investigation of an important disputed element . . . Without rancor and in irenic fashion, Barry answers, Yes, the Servant did rise from the dead. . . . Those wishing to engage the exegetical evidence should not neglect this text.”
—Stephen M. Vantassel, Dean of Students in Theology, King’s Evangelical Divinity School

Much of the prophecy that comes after the book of Isaiah hinges on the ideas in Isaiah 52 and 53. I now see this passage “written” on almost every page of books like Daniel, Ezekiel and throughout the New Testament stories of Jesus. I truly believe that seeing Isaiah 52 and 53 through the lens of the ancient world and Hebrew poetry will change the way you read Isaiah and the Bible in general. So, pick up a copy for your Logos Bible Software and dive into the world of prophecy and resurrection.

Taking Advantage of Your Logos Account

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Your Logos.com account many great features in Logos. You already know that your account enables you to purchase and download packages and resources for Logos 4, as well as sync your Logos 4 settings and preferences across different machines and platforms, but that is only the beginning!

Your Logos account and mobile Bible study

When you use your Logos.com account with our free iPad/iPhone app you get access to 31 additional resources beyond the myriad of free Bibles from Bible.Logos.com which you get for simply turning on the app. Your Logos account allows you to access many of your resources from your Logos 4 package with the iPad/iPhone,* as well as sync your reading plans and bookmarks from your desktop or laptop.

If you have another phone or mobile browser your account works at library.Logos.com in much the same way as it does on the iPad, providing you access to 31 free resources, letting you use many of your Logos 4 resources* on the go, and syncing your reading plans and bookmarks.

Your Logos account and forum community

The Logos Forums are a great place to meet other users, get many of your questions answered by a community of knowledgeable and helpful users, and contribute your own ideas, tricks, and suggestions. While anyone can read the forums, signing in to your account allows you to do more than spectate—you get to be a part of the discussion.

When you click on the My Account button in the top right corner of Logos.com (screenshot) you are brought to your account’s control panel. The profile tab (screenshot) allows you to add information and links that others can see in your profile on the forum page. In fact, you can add or change the avatar associated with your account as well. (screenshot) My friend Thomas Black graciously allowed me to link to his profile as an example of what you see when you check out someone’s profile on the blog.

Your Logos account control panel

The account control panel doesn’t just let you change your profile information, it offers you a host of other great features as well. For instance, you can check out your previous purchases from the order history. (screenshot) Clicking on the Order # brings up your receipt for any of your purchases.

You can also follow the tabs to see your Pre-Pub orders (screenshot), your community pricing bids (screenshot), and manage your subscription to Bible Study Magazine.

Lastly, you can click the Mailing List tab and tailor your email updates to suit your interests. You can chose one or all of a number of categories to keep informed on the latest promotions, discounts, and information. Are you a Greek language enthusiast? Check the Greek Interest Group box and stay up-to-date on the latest information for Greek aficionados. Waiting anxiously for the official Logos Bible Software 4 release for the Mac? Choose the Mac Interest group and get updates right in your in-box. The Freebies, Contests, Giveways group lets you hear about new contests, giveaways, promotions, products and special discounts.With eight specific categories to choose from, you can make sure to hear the latest about the things that interest you most.

To access all of these great features you are signed in to make the most of your Logos experience. If you don’t have a Logos.com account yet, you can easily create one for free!

*Currently there are over 3,500 Logos Bible Software titles that will work on the iPad and the iPhone. More titles are being added regularly as we secure rights and convert titles.

Discount on 35 Volumes of Pauline Scholarship

Today’s post is from Dr. Steve Runge, a scholar-in-residence at Logos Bible Software and author of the Lexham Discourse Greek New Testament, Lexham High Definition New Testament, and the forthcoming Discourse Grammar of the Greek New Testament: A Practical Introduction for Teaching and Exegesis.

One of the best values for buying books for Logos is the Pre-Pub program, where you get a great discount for pre-ordering collections. In the last couple years, the number of Pre-Pubs which have shipped has grown by leaps and bounds. At the same time, the number of new Logos users has also grown, including many who haven’t had the chance to get in on the great Pre-Pubs from years past.

Pauline Studies Library (35 Vols.)

All of these things gave me an idea. What if we bundled the best resources in our backlist of books on a given topic into a library—a library which spanned multiple publishers and collections—and we offered it at a great price?

After digging around, getting permissions from publishers, and checking all the fine print, we are pleased to offer the Pauline Studies Library. At 35 volumes, it’s a massive collection, which offers some of the finest Pauline scholarship available. It includes classic works by F. W. Farrar, C. K. Barrett, F. F. Bruce, and more. It also includes current scholarship, like IVP’s Dictionary of Paul and His Letters and monographs or collected essays from Sheffield and T&T Clark by Francis Watson, Craig Evans, Stanley Porter, Bruce Longenecker, John Polhill and Rudolph Schnackenburg.

If you’re interested in Pauline studies and you’re looking for a great way to expand the results from your Passage Guides and Exegetical Guides, the Pauline Studies Library is a cost-effective way to do so.

The suggested retail for these volumes is over $2,200.00, and even at the normal sale price it would cost you around $800.00. During the month of April, we’re offering this new library for $399.95. That’s around $12 per volume, which is as close as we’ll ever get to the Pre-Pub prices of these resources again! Just enter coupon code APRILPAUL at checkout during the month of April to get the discount.

If you’re looking for a cost-effective way to find exegetical insights into the Pauline epistles, you’ll be hard pressed to find a better deal. But remember, the discount expires on April 30, 2010, so you need to act soon. Check out the product page for all the details on the collection.

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