Last Chance Pre-Pub Deals: 100+ Books Shipping Soon!

We have been ramping up our production lines, and we’re getting ready to ship several collections totaling more than a hundred books in the next couple weeks. The good news for you is that this provides you with one last chance to get some quality books at incredible prices. Once these books ship, the Pre-Pub prices will disappear.

Pillar New Testament Commentary: The Letter to the Hebrews

Here are some of the highlights:

Pillar New Testament Commentary: The Letter to the Hebrews

This commentary is the newest volume in the Pillar New Testament Commentary. The commentary is neither unduly technical nor unhelpfully brief. D. A. Carson wrote that “it would be difficult to find a more helpful guide [to Hebrews] than Peter O’Brien or a guide better endowed with his combination of competence and genial wisdom.” If you’re planning a sermon series or teaching a class on Hebrews, you’ll definitely want to pick up O’Brien’s new commentary.

This commentary will sell for $50.00 after it ships, but between now and October 14 you can get it for $29.95 on Pre-Pub.

The Practical Works of the Rev. Richard Baxter (23 Vols.)

Anchor Yale Bible: Nahum

In one of the newest volumes in the Anchor Yale Bible, Duane Christensen offers a detailed analysis of the Hebrew text, and explores the literary structure and the poetry of the book. It contains original translations, a detailed book outline, verse-by-verse commentary, analysis of interpretive approaches, and lots of introductory material.

The list price for Anchor Yale Bible: Nahum is $65.00, but for a little while longer you can get it on Pre-Pub for $49.95.

The Practical Works of the Rev. Richard Baxter (23 Vols.)

The Practical Works of the Rev. Richard Baxter (23 Vols.) contains the treatises, sermons, and works of one of Puritan England’s most prolific writers and most influential preachers.

http://www.logos.com/products/prepub/details/4218

Richard Baxter preached theological unity during a century of schism, and advocated mutual respect within the church during a period of intense religious warfare. He wrote with the conviction that theology should always be connected with both Christian ethics and human experience. He offers timeless on practical Christian matters, such as worship, devotions, parenting, education, relationships, and more. If you’re interested in the Puritans or in the history of Reformed theology in general, this collection is a must-have.

The sale price will be $349.95 after it ships, but for a few more weeks you can get it for $179.95.

That’s just the tip of the iceberg. There are a ton of additional books shipping in the next few weeks. When these books ship, the Pre-Pub prices disappear. Make sure you get in on these deals while they’re still available! Head on over to the Pre-Pub page to see what else is shipping soon!

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Logos Bible Software 4.1 for Windows Now Shipping

A new version of Logos Bible Software for Windows began shipping yesterday. Version 4.1 is the fifth major update since we launched Logos 4 eleven months ago. Like all previous updates, version 4.1 is a free download for all Logos 4 Windows users.

How Do You Get It?

If you have automatic updating enabled (screenshot), which is the default setting, Logos 4 should notify you that updates are ready to be installed. When you see the balloon tooltip window, right-click on the Logos icon in your system tray and choose to “Install update” (screenshot). If Logos 4 hasn’t downloaded the update by the end of the day, type Update Now into the Command Bar (screenshot). This will force Logos 4 to check for any available updates (screenshot) and begin downloading them.

What’s New in Logos 4.1?

Version 4.1 brings a number of important new features—many of which are in direct response to your requests. Here are the major ones:

  • Advanced printing and exporting
  • Sentence diagramming
  • Smart Tags
  • Gestures

There were also some nice little improvements made to Bible Word Study, graphing Bible search results, keyboard shortcuts, the panel menu, the Passage Guide, Passage Lists, program settings, reading plans, the resource panel, the search panel, and shortcuts. Check out “What’s New in Logos 4.1” to see a complete list of the changes.

Time to Upgrade to Logos 4?

Are you still running Logos 3 (or the old Logos Library System!)? If so, now would be a great time to upgrade to Logos 4. Not only has Logos 4 improved significantly over the last eleven months, but we’re currently having special limited-time discounts of up to 20% off base packages and base package upgrades. And we’re far from done improving Logos 4. I just installed the beta release of version 4.2. To see some of what’s coming, check out the list of additional features we plan to add.

What about Logos 4 for Mac?

In case you missed the news, Logos 4 Mac is now shipping. If you’ve been waiting until it was out of beta testing, now’s your chance to buy a base package or upgrade your current base package at a nice discount. And don’t worry, Mac Users, the Mac team hasn’t slowed down at all. They’re already working on 4.1 and hope to be caught up to the Windows team in the very near future.

Daniel Wallace Writes the Foreword to Discourse Grammar

discoursegrammar

Today’s guest post is from Michael Aubrey, on the marketing team.

The name Daniel Wallace is well-known to today’s Greek students. He’s been teaching at Dallas Theological Seminary for years. His invaluable intermediate grammar, Greek Grammar Beyond the Basics, is used in Bible colleges and seminaries all over the world and in more than two thirds of the schools teaching New Testament Greek in the United States. He’s the senior New Testament editor of the NET Bible and the founder of The Center for the Study of New Testament Manuscripts.

Because of Dr. Wallace’s standing in schools and seminaries and his own contributions to Greek grammar, we were so excited when it was confirmed that he would write the foreword to Steve Runge’s Discourse Grammar of the Greek New Testament! Steve had originally written the Discourse Grammar in order to fill a gap. In Wallace’s own preface to Greek Grammar Beyond the Basics, he had written:

“Contrary to the current trend, this work has no chapter on discourse analysis. . . . DA is too significant a topic to receive merely a token treatment, appended as it were to the end of a book on grammar. It deserves its own full-blown discussion, such as can be found in the works of Cotterell and Turner, D. A. Black, and others.”

And yet, those who have picked up Cotterell and Turner’s Linguistics and Biblical Interpretation or D. A. Black’s Linguistics and New Testament Interpretation: Essays on Discourse Analysis know that the authors of these important volumes never intend their work to function as a comprehensive introduction to discourse grammar. The latter is a collection of high quality, but technical essays on specific topics in discourse analysis (which Steve refers to at several points) and the former has as its central focus issues related to hermeneutics and interpretation rather than grammar.” Steve Runge’s Discourse Grammar complements both of these important books by filling in the gap between grammar and interpretation (Cotterell and Turner’s volume) and between traditional grammar and advanced discourse studies (D. A. Black’s book).

And with these realities in mind, we were excited to see these words in Dr. Wallace’s foreword:

This volume is long overdue. Students of the New Testament have been barraged for decades with linguists touting the value of discourse analysis, but few works have demonstrated its importance for exegesis. . . . What Runge has done is to focus on the exegetical significance of discourse grammar for Neutestamenters. He has gathered together several strands of linguistic insights (he calls his approach ‘cross-linguistic’ and ‘function-based’) that are often treated in isolation and sometimes without much more than lip service for exegesis. In short, Runge has made discourse analysis accessible, systematic, comprehensive, and meaningful to students of the New Testament. His presentation is clear, straightforward, and well researched. . . . I have learned a great deal from this volume and will continue to do so for many years. To students of the New Testament, I say, “The time has come. Tolle lege!

Check out Steve’s Discourse Grammar of the Greek New Testament for yourself, you’ll be glad that you did!

Using the Septuagint (LXX) when Studying the New Testament

If you’ve gone to church, listened to sermons, or studied the Bible for any amount of time, you’ve probably heard that the Septuagint (abbreviated “LXX”) is what the NT writers usually quoted from, or that some even say the Septuagint was “Paul’s Bible”.
This is all well and good, but how do we use the Septuagint when we’re studying the New Testament? How do we understand (and identify) quotations from the Septuagint in the NT? And and how do we draw upon the linguistic richness that the Septuagint provided the early Christians?
These are the sorts of questions that R. Timothy McLay examines in his book The Use of the Septuagint in New Testament Research. McLay helpfully provides a summary of the structure of the book at the end of the introduction. Note that “TT” is an abbreviation for “Translation Technique”:

We will follow this introductory chapter with our investigation of the citation in Acts 15:16–18. Chapter one will serve to introduce the reader to the complex world of the use of Scripture in the NT and to raise some of the issues that are involved. Chapter two will examine TT in the LXX and the problem of whether the NT writer is quoting a Hebrew or Greek text. Here we will begin defining the purpose of TT and discuss the problems of methodology for analyzing TT. This chapter contains some discussion that is quite technical in nature; it may be skimmed by students who are more interested in the impact of the Greek Jewish Scriptures on the NT. We will conclude the examination of TT in the following chapter by proposing a methodology for analyzing TT. Chapter four will outline the transmission history of the LXX and its recensions. Again, the knowledge gained from the study of specific texts will be applied to NT research. Chapter five will draw upon the arguments of the previous chapters as we examine more passages in order to determine how the NT writers’ use of the Greek Jewish Scriptures is reflected in their theology. We will argue that the theology of the NT exhibits the distinct influence of the Greek scriptural tradition by its use of vocabulary, its citations of Scripture, and its theological concepts. The final chapter will offer concluding remarks.
R. Timothy McLay, The Use of the Septuagint in New Testament Research (Grand Rapids, Mich.: W.B. Eerdmans Pub. Co., 2003), 16. emphasis added.

As you can see, using the Septuagint when studying the New Testament is more than just identifying a quotation, it can also involve work to understand the relation between the Hebrew and Greek editions of the quotation, and further understanding of any changes the NT author may have made when quoting. Deeper than that, there are issues of common vocabulary (end of chapter five) and how term usage during the time of NT composition may have influenced early Christian understanding of the Septuagint text itself. This is all fascinating stuff!
McLay’s book is helpful because it delves deeply into methodology. A complementary book for helping with one’s examination of the New Testament’s use of the Old Testament is Carson and Beale’s Commentary on the New Testament Use of the Old Testament. This exhaustive volume is nearly 1300 pages of examination, ordered like a commentary, on the New Testament use of the Old Testament. In other words, several of the authors use techniques like those explained by McLay in their identification and discussion of quotations of the Old Testament.
Of course, also useful in this type of study is an edition of the Septuagint itself. We have been working on our own interlinear edition of the Septuagint, the Lexham Greek-English Interlinear Septuagint, for a few years now. I’m pleased to say we’re coming near the end and, assuming nothing crazy happens, we should have the initial version of the complete Septuagint available in the next few weeks. Of course, users who already have the resource will be able to download updates when it is released.
But, this post is already long. I’ll have to blog about the Lexham Greek-English Interlinear Septuagint in a few weeks when it’s (hopefully!) ready.

Logos 4: Compare Pericopes

mp|seminars Tips

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos training seminars.

Most Bible publishers divide the books of the Bible into sections or pericopes. Examples of pericopes could be Birth of Jesus, Baptism of Jesus, Temptations of Jesus, and so on. Of course, different publishers section off the Bible differently. You can, however, see, side-by-side, the various biblical pericopes used by these publishers:

  • Choose Tools | Passage Analysis
  • Click Compare Pericopes at the bottom of the window
  • Enter a passage in the Reference box like Phil 1.1
  • Click the Pericope Sets drop down list
  • Select the Bibles you want to use in the report

Now in parallel columns you see pericope titles and divisions from the selected Bibles.

This report is very useful when you’re trying to perform various tasks such as:

  • Determining the outline or structure of a biblical book
  • Planning a preaching / teachingschedule
  • Writing an exegetical paper

Now Shipping: Logos 4 Mac

Mac

Today Is the Day!

After a lot of work and tons of anticipation, we are shipping Logos 4 Mac. We are celebrating this tremendous event with special discounts on all of our base packages and base package upgrades!

The completion of Logos 4 Mac is another huge step in our “one license, any platform” philosophy. Logos Bible Software makes it easy to access the resources in your library when and where you need them whether it is on Mac, Windows, iPhone, iPad, or on the web with Biblia.com.

I caught up with David Mitchell, the Macintosh Technical Lead, and asked him a few questions about the release of Logos 4 Mac.

The origins for Logos 4 Mac really go back to the very beginning of Logos 4 right?

Right. In mid-2006, the development team at Logos started working on an incredibly ambitious project that would eventually become Logos 4. We started by throwing out much of the work that had been done since 1999 and re-imagining what Bible study could be like. This was no small decision, but we realized that in order to take a leap forward, we’d need to start over.

So we chose new technologies. We redesigned features. We thought about how to make the product more approachable to the new or casual user. And we wrote code. Lots of code.

How did you get started working on the Mac product and where did you go from there?

About halfway through the development cycle for Logos 4, Libronix 1.0 for Mac was released, and I was given the opportunity to shift my attention to building Logos 4 for Mac. As we had done with Libronix for Windows, I eventually decided to scrap Libronix for Mac so that we could use all of new the code that had been written for Logos 4 for Windows. This, too, was no small decision, but we knew that it had to be done if we wanted to make the best Bible study experience anywhere available to Mac users.

So we chose even more new technologies. We redesigned code so that it was more portable. We thought about how the ideas we had come up with for Logos 4 would fit best within the context of a Macintosh application. And we hired developers: the team working on Logos 4 for Macintosh today is the same size that the Windows team was when I joined in early 2006.

It sounds like it was a lot of work.

Along the way, many on the team have endured sleepless nights working on code or helping just one more user on the forums. We opened an office in Bellevue and brought in extra developers to help us finish more quickly. And we were robbed . . . twice.

Catching up to the Windows version of Logos 4 has been no small task, but delivering Logos 4 for Mac to you today makes it all worthwhile. I hope everyone enjoys using it as much as I’ve enjoyed writing it.

Logos wants to thank the Mac team for their long hours and tireless work in getting us to where we are today.

Remember, you don’t have to be a Mac user to help us celebrate the release of Logos 4 Mac. Take advantage of our special discounts on all of our base packages and base package upgrades.

Word Biblical Commentary Download Sale!

Word Biblical Commentary

The Word Biblical Commentary is now available for download, and we’re celebrating with a big sale!

For years, the Word Biblical Commentary has been one of our bestselling commentaries. This series emphasizes a thorough analysis of textual, linguistic, structural, and theological evidence. It contains contributions from some of the leading biblical scholars of our time.

The WBC has been available for Logos Bible Software for quite some time, but only as a CD-ROM. Now, with the download available, there’s no need to wait for a CD-ROM to ship, and you don’t need to go through the extra steps of getting Libronix resources to work in Logos 4. This means that if you plan to work on this Sunday’s sermon today, you can download the WBC now and begin using it right away. It’s fast, simple, and easy.

Having the WBC available for download is a milestone for Logos users, so we’re celebrating with a big sale. For a limited time, you can get the 59-volume Word Biblical Commentary for $499.95. That works out to only $8.47 per volume—a phenomenal deal! Remember, the sale price is good for only a few weeks, so you should place your order today to get the special price.

To get the sale price, enter coupon code WBCDOWNLOAD at checkout. You won’t see the sale price on the product website. The only way to get the sale price is to use coupon code.

These volumes are available individually for around $50 each. If you’ve had your eye on getting only a few of these volumes, it’s probably a better idea to spring for the whole set while it’s on sale.

Of course, if you still want to get the CD-ROM, that’s fine, too. The special sale price is good for both the CD-ROM and the download.

This sale ends on October 31, 2010. Get it today!

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Thomas Forsyth Torrance on Logos Bible Software

Torrence
Today’s guest post is by Kyle Anderson, from the Logos Bible Software electronic text development team.

For many, the former University of Edinburgh professor Thomas Forsyth Torrance is best known as the person (alongside the late esteemed Geoffrey Bromiley) responsible for translating Karl Barth’s massive (over 10,000 pages) Church Dogmatics into English and introducing the English-speaking world to the towering theology of Karl Barth.

While we should applaud Torrance for this achievement, we should also keep in mind that he too was a top-notch theologian who spent most of his career working tirelessly for the benefit of the Church through his studies of Patristic theology, the person and work of Jesus Christ, the doctrine of the trinity, our knowledge of God, and reconciling theology and the natural sciences.

Torrance never wavered in his devotion to the Church. Born the oldest son of Chinese missionaries, Torrance began his career not as a professor, but as a parish pastor. This experience helped him develop a deep belief that would shape him the rest of his life: Christian thinking and action is for the glory of God and the benefit of the Church. One of the more famous stories of his life is the 81 year old Torrance traversing the mountains of the Wenchuan area of China carrying a money belt containing 11,200 yuan to help rebuild churches destroyed by the communist takeover in 1935. That’s quite an image for an elder theologian of Torrance’s caliber!

But what about his theology? Currently Logos carries four of his publications. Taken together they form a nice introduction his life’s work.

The first, The Christian Doctrine of God, uses Patristic theology to argue that within the life of God there is trinity in unity and unity in trinity. Or to put it another way: in God’s one being there are three persons—God the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit—and those three persons are one being. For the Christian Church, the doctrine of the trinity isn’t some speculative mind exercise but leads us into a deeper place of worship. Further, he adds, understanding who God is in Himself is to know who God is for us. Because, as Torrance never tires of pointing out, there can be no separation between the being of God as Father, Son, and Holy Spirit and how He has gone about saving us.

The second, Space, Time, and Incarnation, addresses two of Torrance’s specialties: Church history and the person of Jesus Christ. Space, Time, and Incarnation is unique in that rather than being a standard Christology volume, it looks at the spatial aspects of the incarnation. Namely, Torrance rejects the Greek philosophical tradition that thinks of space in terms of a container in favor of the early Church’s belief that in the incarnation Jesus Christ made space for himself. This view was made most visibly manifest in the Nicene term homoousious whereby Jesus is affirmed as one substance of God the Father and the term perichoresis in which there is a mutual indwelling between the person of the trinity. According to Torrance this has a profound impact on the way we speak of Jesus’ presence in our life and worship, even shaping the way we think scientifically about nature.

Lastly, Torrance is well-known for his work in combing the Christian faith with the work of the natural sciences. Our last two volumes: The Ground and Grammar of Theology and Divine and Contingent Order address these questions. In both volumes Torrance calls both the theologian and natural scientist alike to forgo the dualistic habits of mind that have dominated scientific thinking in a post-Copernicus landscape. Instead, both the theologian and the scientist have a scientific obligation to faithfully identify and describe phenomena as they are presented to us without rupturing the world into two realms—the spiritual and the phenomenal. Thus, rather than being competing worldviews both the theologian and the scientist are engaged in an enterprise of faithfully describing what God has presented to us. All persons are God’s priests of creation who are charged by God to identify, name and “to bring to expression the manifold realities of the created world around him . . . to bring the universe to view and understanding in its inherent harmonies and regularities and thus to allow the basic design, the meaning, of the universe to become disclosed.”

If you are in the market to grow your theology library, you really should look into Thomas Forsyth Torrance. You can also find three of Torrance’s works in the nine volume Science & Theology Collection!

The Mac Giveaway!

We are sorry, the Mac Giveaway expired on Friday, October 1. Please watch for a posting of the winners on the giveaway page!

The official ship date of Logos 4 Mac is right around the corner! The completed version will be rolled out to new and existing users on Friday, October 1, 2010. Wow! That’s only a couple days away! The anticipation around Logos is palpable!

We just wanted to remind you that it is not too late for you to enter the Logos 4 Mac Ship Day Giveaway.

The Giveaway

We wanted everyone to share in our excitement for the Logos 4 Mac ship date. So, we decided to do our biggest giveaway ever. How big? We are giving away 105 valuable prizes to 105 different winners! The prizes include:

  • A 21.5″, 3.06GHz iMac worth $1,199.00
  • A 13″, 2.4GHz Macbook Pro worth $1,199.00
  • A 16GB Wi-Fi iPad worth $499.00
  • An 8GB iPod Touch worth $199.00
  • An 8GB Silver iPod Nano worth $149.00
  • Twenty $25 Apple Store gift cards
  • Thirty $15 iTunes gift cards
  • and fifty $10 Logos.com gift cards

How Do I Enter?

There are multiple ways to enter the giveaway, and you may do all of them. Several of the ways to enter can be done only once, but a few may be done multiple times! All the information you need to enter can be found at this link!

Don’t Forget About the Sale on Base Packages!

For a limited time, we are offering a special launch discount—20% off on all of our base packages and up to 20% off of upgrades. You don’t have to be a Mac user to take advantage of this deal!

So come one, come all. Take advantage of our deep discounts and huge number of giveaways to celebrate the launch of Logos 4 Mac.

Logos 4: Compare Parallel Passages

mp|seminars Tips

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos training seminars.

You perhaps know that some events in the Bible are recorded more than one time. For example, Matthew, Mark, and Luke all record the account of Jesus being tempted by Satan. The passages describing the same event in the Bible are called parallel passages.

In addition, a book displaying these parallel passages is called a harmony. A harmony of the gospels, for instance, usually shows, in column format, parallel passages from Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John. With a harmony you can easily read how various biblical writers described the same event.

Did you know that your library likely contains numerous harmonies? The Parallel Passages section of the Passage Guide automatically searches these harmonies for you, but you can also open them individually from the Library:

  • Click the Library icon
  • In the Find box of the Library enter this text: type:harmony
  • You should now see all of your harmonies listed
  • Click a specific title to open it, such as, A Harmony of the Gospels by A.T. Robertson
    Note: A Harmony of the Gospels, by A .T. Robertson is included in base packages from Bible Study Library and above.
  • Click the panel menu on this resource and select Show table of contents
  • From the contents pane click a section title like 25. The Three Temptations of Jesus

Now by reading three different accounts of the same event, we may be able to glean details perhaps we overlooked before!