Logos 4: Bible Search Results to a Passage List

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Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos training seminars.

Years ago when I used print books, I always had a legal pad on my desk so I could record a list of verses as I studied. I would do all sorts of things with these verses: memorize them, create a handout to distribute to the congregation or class, file them away for future reference and so on. With Logos 4, it’s very easy to create, save, and reopen such a list with a file called the Passage List. Here’s just one way to create a Passage List:

  • Click the Search icon
  • Select Bible as the Search type
  • Set your search criteria by using the drop down lists
  • Type a word or phrase in the find box such as mercy or "but God"
  • Click the search arrow or press the Enter key
  • Click the Search panel menu (top-left corner of panel) when the Bible search results appear
  • Select Save as Passage List

You’ll notice that a Passage List file is created. You can now name the file, select the Bible(s) to be used in the list and so on. Anytime you want to reopen and use the list choose the File menu and click the desired list to open it.

You can create as many Passage Lists as you want. I encourage you to make numerous lists as you study topics such as forgiveness, angels, and so on. Then, when you need to see verses for a particular subject, just return to the File menu.

A Collection of 14 Books on How to be Dogmatic?!?

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No, Berkouwer’s Studies in Dogmatics is not actually about how to be dogmatic (that is, how to present your opinions as unchallengeable or the final word). In the field of theology, dogmatic refers to a study of doctrine. Studies in Dogmatics is a 14 volume work on some of the most important doctrine in church history.

Walter Elwell, Professor Emeritus of Bible and Theology at Wheaton College, had this to say about Berkouwer’s Studies in Dogmatics: “[It is] perhaps the most monumental evangelical theological project of [the last] century. Written in almost conversational style, these volumes deal with topics of theological concern, such as divine election, faith and sanctification, Holy Scripture, and the church, rather than presenting a tightly argued system of thought. . . . Perhaps the outstanding Reformed theologian of this generation, Berkouwer never wavered from his commitment to the principles of Scripture, faith, and grace alone” (Evangelical Dictionary of Theology, pg. 151).

Want to see what you can do with Studies in Dogmatics in Logos Bible Software? Check out my video below.

Interested in a concise book on Reformed doctrine? Pick up Summary of Christian Doctrine by Louis Berkhof for $18. (Both Berkouwer and Louis Berkhof were influenced by Abraham Kuyper and Herman Bavinck.)

Announcing BibleTech 2011!

BibleTech

We are gearing up for BibleTech 2011, which will be held in Seattle, WA, March 25–26. This will be our fourth annual conference focusing on the many ways technology is affecting and being affected by how we translate, interpret, communicate and transmit the Scriptures. BibleTech isn’t just a great opportunity to hear speakers address many of the tech savvy issues that are important to you, but also a chance to interact and network with industry leaders and others who share your interests. Stories abound of the working relationships and friendships initiated at BibleTech conferences.

Calling all presenters!

We are putting out a call for programmers, publishers, tagging experts, information/library scientists, technologists, thought leaders, design gurus, information architects, webmasters, or anyone working at the intersection of the Bible and technology to lead conference sessions and round-table discussions! It is as easy as clicking on entry link filling out the participation form.

We get a lot of entries and we encourage you to be as descriptive as possible when sharing your ideas for topics and content. And, if you have multiple ideas for sessions, feel free to fill out multiple entries.

We will close the call for participation on November 30 so that we can choose the best session speakers for next year. Please have your entry in by then!

Get the latest information about BibleTech 2011

Come “like” us on Facebook and get the latest BibleTech information right in your news feed. You can also follow us on Twitter.

Registration

Register today for $159.95 and guarantee that you don’t miss out on BibleTech 2011!

You should follow us on Twitter here.

What’s New at FreeBookPreview.com?

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If you haven’t downloaded the Logos Bible Software iPhone app, what are you waiting for? It is not only an absolutely free mobile solution for your Bible study needs and an incredible complement to your Logos base package* (giving you access to many of your resources wherever you are), it also gives you free previews of entire Christian books right there on your iPhone, iPad, or iPod Touch.

With FreeBookPreview.com you can examine a book as closely as you want for the preview period. It’s sort of like going to your local bookstore and getting an entire week to really peruse a book before you buy it (except you get to take the text with you, wherever you go). Then—when you love it—you can purchase a print edition right there from the app, or sometimes even add it to your Logos Bible Software resources.

Continue Reading…

Logos 4: Keeping the Home Page Closed

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Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos training seminars.

By default, Logos 4 starts with the Home Page showing. This “newspaper-like” panecontains links to interesting articles, blogs, daily devotionals, and more. After reading through”Logos Today”you probably close it so you can move into more Bible study. Have you noticed that the Home Page then reopens each time you clear the screen by closing all the panels? You may or may not like this feature. You can easily change this default:

  • Click Customize in the lower left hand corner of the Home Page
  • Uncheck the box Show home page at startup

Now when you close all the panels on the screen, the Home Page will not reopen. Anytime you want the Home Page, just click the Home icon.

Last Chance Pre-Pub Deals: 100+ Books Shipping Soon!

We have been ramping up our production lines, and we’re getting ready to ship several collections totaling more than a hundred books in the next couple weeks. The good news for you is that this provides you with one last chance to get some quality books at incredible prices. Once these books ship, the Pre-Pub prices will disappear.

Pillar New Testament Commentary: The Letter to the Hebrews

Here are some of the highlights:

Pillar New Testament Commentary: The Letter to the Hebrews

This commentary is the newest volume in the Pillar New Testament Commentary. The commentary is neither unduly technical nor unhelpfully brief. D. A. Carson wrote that “it would be difficult to find a more helpful guide [to Hebrews] than Peter O’Brien or a guide better endowed with his combination of competence and genial wisdom.” If you’re planning a sermon series or teaching a class on Hebrews, you’ll definitely want to pick up O’Brien’s new commentary.

This commentary will sell for $50.00 after it ships, but between now and October 14 you can get it for $29.95 on Pre-Pub.

The Practical Works of the Rev. Richard Baxter (23 Vols.)

Anchor Yale Bible: Nahum

In one of the newest volumes in the Anchor Yale Bible, Duane Christensen offers a detailed analysis of the Hebrew text, and explores the literary structure and the poetry of the book. It contains original translations, a detailed book outline, verse-by-verse commentary, analysis of interpretive approaches, and lots of introductory material.

The list price for Anchor Yale Bible: Nahum is $65.00, but for a little while longer you can get it on Pre-Pub for $49.95.

The Practical Works of the Rev. Richard Baxter (23 Vols.)

The Practical Works of the Rev. Richard Baxter (23 Vols.) contains the treatises, sermons, and works of one of Puritan England’s most prolific writers and most influential preachers.

http://www.logos.com/products/prepub/details/4218

Richard Baxter preached theological unity during a century of schism, and advocated mutual respect within the church during a period of intense religious warfare. He wrote with the conviction that theology should always be connected with both Christian ethics and human experience. He offers timeless on practical Christian matters, such as worship, devotions, parenting, education, relationships, and more. If you’re interested in the Puritans or in the history of Reformed theology in general, this collection is a must-have.

The sale price will be $349.95 after it ships, but for a few more weeks you can get it for $179.95.

That’s just the tip of the iceberg. There are a ton of additional books shipping in the next few weeks. When these books ship, the Pre-Pub prices disappear. Make sure you get in on these deals while they’re still available! Head on over to the Pre-Pub page to see what else is shipping soon!

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Logos Bible Software 4.1 for Windows Now Shipping

A new version of Logos Bible Software for Windows began shipping yesterday. Version 4.1 is the fifth major update since we launched Logos 4 eleven months ago. Like all previous updates, version 4.1 is a free download for all Logos 4 Windows users.

How Do You Get It?

If you have automatic updating enabled (screenshot), which is the default setting, Logos 4 should notify you that updates are ready to be installed. When you see the balloon tooltip window, right-click on the Logos icon in your system tray and choose to “Install update” (screenshot). If Logos 4 hasn’t downloaded the update by the end of the day, type Update Now into the Command Bar (screenshot). This will force Logos 4 to check for any available updates (screenshot) and begin downloading them.

What’s New in Logos 4.1?

Version 4.1 brings a number of important new features—many of which are in direct response to your requests. Here are the major ones:

  • Advanced printing and exporting
  • Sentence diagramming
  • Smart Tags
  • Gestures

There were also some nice little improvements made to Bible Word Study, graphing Bible search results, keyboard shortcuts, the panel menu, the Passage Guide, Passage Lists, program settings, reading plans, the resource panel, the search panel, and shortcuts. Check out “What’s New in Logos 4.1” to see a complete list of the changes.

Time to Upgrade to Logos 4?

Are you still running Logos 3 (or the old Logos Library System!)? If so, now would be a great time to upgrade to Logos 4. Not only has Logos 4 improved significantly over the last eleven months, but we’re currently having special limited-time discounts of up to 20% off base packages and base package upgrades. And we’re far from done improving Logos 4. I just installed the beta release of version 4.2. To see some of what’s coming, check out the list of additional features we plan to add.

What about Logos 4 for Mac?

In case you missed the news, Logos 4 Mac is now shipping. If you’ve been waiting until it was out of beta testing, now’s your chance to buy a base package or upgrade your current base package at a nice discount. And don’t worry, Mac Users, the Mac team hasn’t slowed down at all. They’re already working on 4.1 and hope to be caught up to the Windows team in the very near future.

Daniel Wallace Writes the Foreword to Discourse Grammar

discoursegrammar

Today’s guest post is from Michael Aubrey, on the marketing team.

The name Daniel Wallace is well-known to today’s Greek students. He’s been teaching at Dallas Theological Seminary for years. His invaluable intermediate grammar, Greek Grammar Beyond the Basics, is used in Bible colleges and seminaries all over the world and in more than two thirds of the schools teaching New Testament Greek in the United States. He’s the senior New Testament editor of the NET Bible and the founder of The Center for the Study of New Testament Manuscripts.

Because of Dr. Wallace’s standing in schools and seminaries and his own contributions to Greek grammar, we were so excited when it was confirmed that he would write the foreword to Steve Runge’s Discourse Grammar of the Greek New Testament! Steve had originally written the Discourse Grammar in order to fill a gap. In Wallace’s own preface to Greek Grammar Beyond the Basics, he had written:

“Contrary to the current trend, this work has no chapter on discourse analysis. . . . DA is too significant a topic to receive merely a token treatment, appended as it were to the end of a book on grammar. It deserves its own full-blown discussion, such as can be found in the works of Cotterell and Turner, D. A. Black, and others.”

And yet, those who have picked up Cotterell and Turner’s Linguistics and Biblical Interpretation or D. A. Black’s Linguistics and New Testament Interpretation: Essays on Discourse Analysis know that the authors of these important volumes never intend their work to function as a comprehensive introduction to discourse grammar. The latter is a collection of high quality, but technical essays on specific topics in discourse analysis (which Steve refers to at several points) and the former has as its central focus issues related to hermeneutics and interpretation rather than grammar.” Steve Runge’s Discourse Grammar complements both of these important books by filling in the gap between grammar and interpretation (Cotterell and Turner’s volume) and between traditional grammar and advanced discourse studies (D. A. Black’s book).

And with these realities in mind, we were excited to see these words in Dr. Wallace’s foreword:

This volume is long overdue. Students of the New Testament have been barraged for decades with linguists touting the value of discourse analysis, but few works have demonstrated its importance for exegesis. . . . What Runge has done is to focus on the exegetical significance of discourse grammar for Neutestamenters. He has gathered together several strands of linguistic insights (he calls his approach ‘cross-linguistic’ and ‘function-based’) that are often treated in isolation and sometimes without much more than lip service for exegesis. In short, Runge has made discourse analysis accessible, systematic, comprehensive, and meaningful to students of the New Testament. His presentation is clear, straightforward, and well researched. . . . I have learned a great deal from this volume and will continue to do so for many years. To students of the New Testament, I say, “The time has come. Tolle lege!

Check out Steve’s Discourse Grammar of the Greek New Testament for yourself, you’ll be glad that you did!

Using the Septuagint (LXX) when Studying the New Testament

If you’ve gone to church, listened to sermons, or studied the Bible for any amount of time, you’ve probably heard that the Septuagint (abbreviated “LXX”) is what the NT writers usually quoted from, or that some even say the Septuagint was “Paul’s Bible”.
This is all well and good, but how do we use the Septuagint when we’re studying the New Testament? How do we understand (and identify) quotations from the Septuagint in the NT? And and how do we draw upon the linguistic richness that the Septuagint provided the early Christians?
These are the sorts of questions that R. Timothy McLay examines in his book The Use of the Septuagint in New Testament Research. McLay helpfully provides a summary of the structure of the book at the end of the introduction. Note that “TT” is an abbreviation for “Translation Technique”:

We will follow this introductory chapter with our investigation of the citation in Acts 15:16–18. Chapter one will serve to introduce the reader to the complex world of the use of Scripture in the NT and to raise some of the issues that are involved. Chapter two will examine TT in the LXX and the problem of whether the NT writer is quoting a Hebrew or Greek text. Here we will begin defining the purpose of TT and discuss the problems of methodology for analyzing TT. This chapter contains some discussion that is quite technical in nature; it may be skimmed by students who are more interested in the impact of the Greek Jewish Scriptures on the NT. We will conclude the examination of TT in the following chapter by proposing a methodology for analyzing TT. Chapter four will outline the transmission history of the LXX and its recensions. Again, the knowledge gained from the study of specific texts will be applied to NT research. Chapter five will draw upon the arguments of the previous chapters as we examine more passages in order to determine how the NT writers’ use of the Greek Jewish Scriptures is reflected in their theology. We will argue that the theology of the NT exhibits the distinct influence of the Greek scriptural tradition by its use of vocabulary, its citations of Scripture, and its theological concepts. The final chapter will offer concluding remarks.
R. Timothy McLay, The Use of the Septuagint in New Testament Research (Grand Rapids, Mich.: W.B. Eerdmans Pub. Co., 2003), 16. emphasis added.

As you can see, using the Septuagint when studying the New Testament is more than just identifying a quotation, it can also involve work to understand the relation between the Hebrew and Greek editions of the quotation, and further understanding of any changes the NT author may have made when quoting. Deeper than that, there are issues of common vocabulary (end of chapter five) and how term usage during the time of NT composition may have influenced early Christian understanding of the Septuagint text itself. This is all fascinating stuff!
McLay’s book is helpful because it delves deeply into methodology. A complementary book for helping with one’s examination of the New Testament’s use of the Old Testament is Carson and Beale’s Commentary on the New Testament Use of the Old Testament. This exhaustive volume is nearly 1300 pages of examination, ordered like a commentary, on the New Testament use of the Old Testament. In other words, several of the authors use techniques like those explained by McLay in their identification and discussion of quotations of the Old Testament.
Of course, also useful in this type of study is an edition of the Septuagint itself. We have been working on our own interlinear edition of the Septuagint, the Lexham Greek-English Interlinear Septuagint, for a few years now. I’m pleased to say we’re coming near the end and, assuming nothing crazy happens, we should have the initial version of the complete Septuagint available in the next few weeks. Of course, users who already have the resource will be able to download updates when it is released.
But, this post is already long. I’ll have to blog about the Lexham Greek-English Interlinear Septuagint in a few weeks when it’s (hopefully!) ready.

Logos 4: Compare Pericopes

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Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos training seminars.

Most Bible publishers divide the books of the Bible into sections or pericopes. Examples of pericopes could be Birth of Jesus, Baptism of Jesus, Temptations of Jesus, and so on. Of course, different publishers section off the Bible differently. You can, however, see, side-by-side, the various biblical pericopes used by these publishers:

  • Choose Tools | Passage Analysis
  • Click Compare Pericopes at the bottom of the window
  • Enter a passage in the Reference box like Phil 1.1
  • Click the Pericope Sets drop down list
  • Select the Bibles you want to use in the report

Now in parallel columns you see pericope titles and divisions from the selected Bibles.

This report is very useful when you’re trying to perform various tasks such as:

  • Determining the outline or structure of a biblical book
  • Planning a preaching / teachingschedule
  • Writing an exegetical paper