Get Your Custom Upgrade Discount Today!

Logos-5There are three ways to make Logos 5 even more affordable: Dynamic Pricing, your custom upgrade discount, and a payment plan. Here’s how they combine to give you the best deal possible:

Custom savings and an extra discount

Dynamic Pricing gives you a custom discount based on the books you own. If you already own even one resource in the base package you want, you’ll get a lower price. And the more titles you already own, the bigger your upgrade discount! During the Logos 5 upgrade sale, it’s not just books—you can get a custom upgrade discount based on everything in your library, including resources and datasets.

Even if you don’t already own a base package (or you’re using an older version of Logos, like Logos 1.0 or Libronix), if you own any commentaries or collections—or even part of a collection—included in your new base package, these resources will contribute to your savings.

Get special limited-time savings: log in to your Logos.com account and check out your custom upgrade discount!

Payment plans: lock in your discount and spread out the costs

In addition to getting special discounts when you upgrade, you can lighten the payment load by taking advantage of 18- to 24-month interest-free payment plans. Payment plans give you the best of both worlds: you can make your payments more manageable by spacing them out, and you can start using Logos 5 right away.

Get credit for the resources you already own, take advantage of limited-time upgrade discounts, and start using budget-friendly payment plans: upgrade today to get your best deal on Logos 5!

Get 50% Off Fortress Press Books with Twitter #DailyDeals!

paul-and-palestinian-judaismEvery day, we offer a Twitter #DailyDeal: a limited-time offer for 50% off one of our products. This week, we’re partnering with Fortress Press to offer 50% off six powerful study resources!

Today’s #DailyDeal is Paul and Palestinian Judaism. Wayne A. Meeks, Woolsey Professor Emeritus of Religious Studies at Yale, says:

“For New Testament students still trapped in Billerbeck-and-Kittel scholarship, the book will be revolutionary. For everyone who tries to understand early Judaism or the Christian movement that emerged from it, Sanders’ work requires a thorough rethinking of our assumptions.”

Use coupon code 15465 today to get it for 50% off!

Here’s how to make sure you don’t miss a deal:

  1. Follow us on Twitter @Logos.
  2. Each day, look for the DailyDeal hashtag (#) for a new special offer.
  3. Click the tweet’s hyperlink, and use the provided coupon code to get 50% off!


See a deal your friends might like? Share it with them by clicking “retweet” on each deal this week.

Follow us on Twitter and save 50% this week on Baker products!

Save Time and Money with Lexham Press

Lexham_Sale_Blog_Header

Lexham Press offers digital-first study resources that help you interpret, preach, and apply the Bible. Lexham’s publications are specifically designed for Logos—they take full advantage of your software’s unique tagging and Bible-knowledge databases. And for just one more week, many of Lexham Press’ top resources are on sale. Get yours today!

Here are a couple of Lexham Press resources designed with preachers in mind:1500-quotations-for-preachers-with-slides

1,500 Quotations for Preachers, with Slides

On sale for 17% off!

It can take hours to find the right quotation to complement your sermon. With the 1,500 Quotations collection, though, finding a powerful quote takes just minutes. You’ll even get elegant slides to make sharing easy! Pastor J. D. Greear says, “Preachers of every stripe will find this a beneficial addition to their Logos collection.”

These 1,500 quotes come from some of Christianity’s most profound and influential voices, including John ChrysostomAnselm of CanterburyThomas AquinasJohn Bunyan, and G.K. Chesterton.

Get it today!

pastorum-series-collectionPastorum Series Collection

On sale for $60 off!

The Pastorum Series Collection (which includes 1,500 Quotations for Preachers and far more) is designed to help you prepare richer, more memorable sermons in less time. You’ll enhance your sermon preparation with a wealth of study questions, application ideas, worship-service plans, slides with statistical graphics, and more. In addition to hundreds of insightful quotes from all across the history of Christianity, the collection includes 400 prayers from the Bible, Augustine of Hippo, Francis of Assisi, Thomas à Kempis, John Calvin, Charles Spurgeon, and others. These resources were built with your Logos library in mind—study questions link directly to related resources, so you can go as deep as you want.

Get it today!

These aren’t all the Lexham Press books on sale. Check out the Lexham Press sale to see them all!

Free Book: Theological Interpretation of the New Testament

Theological Interpretation of the New TestamentThis week only, get Kevin J. Vanhoozer’s Theological Interpretation of the New Testament—free! Just join the email list below to get your coupon code.

A book-by-book New Testament survey

“The quality of the individual essays is high, the New Testament scholarship is exemplary. . . . The book might function very well in an introductory class at the first professional level of seminary education interested in acquainting students with the theological texture of the books of the New Testament.”
—Erik Heen, Review of Biblical Literature

This valuable book features material from the award-winning Dictionary for Theological Interpretation of the Bible to walk you through a comprehensive book-by-book survey of the New Testament. Throughout the volume, David E. Garland, N.T. Wright, I. Howard Marshall, and other contributing editors cover the major theological ideas for each book of the New Testament.

This is one freebie you don’t want to miss! Join the Baker list below to get your free book.1

Get your free book:


 
  1. Coupon codes will be sent out each evening. You’ll also be signed up to receive future deals from Baker. []

Why Do I Need So Many Books?

Logos Base PackagesWhen we talk about how big our libraries are, we sometimes get asked:

“Why would I need so many books? How could I possibly read them all?”

It’s a reasonable question.

There are 200 books in Starter, 2,500 in Portfolio, and more than 40,000 available altogether in Logos. We’re adding between 50 and 100 books each week. We’re regularly producing multivolume commentaries, big reference sets, and bundles with dozens or hundreds of books. It’s a lot of material.

The power of networks

When Alexander Graham Bell invented the telephone, it was a technological marvel, but it was useless by itself.

So he added a second phone and connected the two. Now they worked—but only if they were connected. As more phones were added—three, four, five, ten, a hundred, a thousand—the phones stopped being as valuable as the network itself.

With a thousand phones, you can remove one without compromising the network: the network has become its own thing, which makes each individual phone more valuable.

The network adds more value than the phone has by itself.

Years ago, Bob Metcalfe quantified this. Metcalfe’s Law states that the value of a network is equal to the square of the size of the network:

“If there are n people in a network, and the value of the network to each of them is proportional to the number of other users, then the total value of the network (to all the users) is proportional to n * (n – 1) = n2 – n. If the value of a network to a single user is $1 for each other user on the network, then a network of size 10 has a total value of roughly $100. In contrast, a network of size 100 has a total value of roughly $10,000. A tenfold increase in the size of the network leads to a hundredfold increase in its value.”

As you add more nodes, the efficiency and value of the network increase exponentially.

So what does this have to do with Logos books?

LibraryConnectionsLogos books work the same way as Alexander Graham Bell’s connected telephones. The value of having a big library isn’t just in the books themselves. It’s in the network that connects them. And the more books you have, the bigger your network—and, by extension, the more valuable each piece of the network becomes.

Logos books are tightly linked to one another. Click a citation to access the source. Then click the Bible reference in the source to see the Greek text. Then click a Greek word to open your lexicon. Then click one of the examples of classic literature in the lexical entry to see the source. And repeat.

In the 59-volume Word Biblical Commentary, there are 1,279,318 links to thousands of books. When you consider Logos base packages that offer hundreds or thousands of books, we’re talking about a very, very large number of links. As the number of resources rises linearly, the number of links rises exponentially—along with the overall value of the library as a whole.

This is what makes Logos books different from print, not to mention from other ebook formats. Just like a disconnected phone isn’t as valuable as a connected one, a disconnected print edition or ebook isn’t as valuable as a connected one.

When you add a book to your library, you’re not just adding content to your library, like you would be if you placed a new print book on a shelf. Instead, you’re adding a new destination for thousands of links in your library that already exist right now.

Print books and other ebooks are the end product themselves. They have inherent value, but that’s it. Logos books, on the other hand, have not only the same inherent value as print, but also the networked value: they’re your entry into a massive, interconnected ecosystem of resources for Bible study, research, and more. This is what makes them so much more valuable than other editions.

So when you hear about a Logos user adding a 10-volume commentary set to their base package, it’s not because they want to read all 10 books. In fact, they might never read any of the books—not cover-to-cover, at least. Instead, they’re adding value to their whole library.

Build a bigger, smarter library

Right now, you can get a custom Logos 5 upgrade discount!

Get the most out of your library—check out your discount, and upgrade today.

Introducing the Cutting Edge Series with Michael Bird

CuttingEdge-JustCover-223Yesterday marked the release of Lexham Press’ newest series, Cutting Edge. The first book in the series, David deSilva’s Transformation: The Heart of Paul’s Gospel, is now available for pre-order! To celebrate the series’ debut, we’re offering Transformation for the low price of $6.95 for the first two weeks. Pre-order it now before the price goes up!

Edited by renowned scholar Michael Bird, the Cutting Edge series engages significant topics in contemporary biblical scholarship, making them applicable in the life of the church and accessible to busy students of the Word.

We asked Michael Bird a few questions about this exciting new series:

What are the goals of the Cutting Edge series?

The purpose of the series is to provide, as the name says, cutting-edge studies on important and disputed topics relevant to the contemporary church. It aims to explain to pastors, students, and laypeople the significance of some major ideas that are floating around in biblical and theological studies. In some cases, the volumes will suggest fresh and provocative approaches to tired old topics.

How does the Cutting Edge series respond to major issues the church is facing?

Each short book will offer a brief engagement with a controversial topic. The volumes are designed to be accessible for nonspecialists, allowing them to understand the issues and appreciate what the debate is about. The series will force readers to think through the issues and decide on the best option.

How will Cutting Edge connect our users with the latest in biblical scholarship?

The Cutting Edge series provides Logos users with the opportunity to access the best and brightest in theological studies right on their screens. If you want to keep up with the latest trends in biblical studies or hear a scholar’s proposal on how to make sense of a controversial subject, this will be the place to do it.

What sets the Cutting Edge series apart from similar products?

There are a number of introductions to current issues in either journals or lengthy volumes. This series is meant to be a short and concise introduction to disputed areas that’s deliverable on Logos platforms and associated media.

We can’t wait to release this first book in the series. In Transformation: The Heart of Paul’s Gospel, David deSilva will expand your definition of the gospel message as presented in Paul’s letters. He argues that it is far richer than the “get out of hell free” pass that some Christians have unintentionally reduced it to today. Instead, deSilva will help us explore how Paul’s words in Romans speak of the gospel as the means to transform and renew all of creation—including ourselves.

Don’t miss out on this excellent new volume. Pre-order Transformation: The Heart of Paul’s Gospel before the price goes up!

Understand the Building Blocks of Logic

works-of-aristotleTruth.

Sometimes it seems like philosophy has given up on the concept. Postmodernism tends to treat it as relative; poststructuralism tends to treat it as an attribute of language, not reality.

That’s why it’s so refreshing to read a philosopher who sets out to build a framework for proving what’s true: Aristotle.

3 Rules of Thought

Aristotle wrote on everything from biology to poetry to rhetoric, but he’s best known for his meticulous work on logic. In the Organon (six of Aristotle’s core texts—Categories, On Interpretation, Prior Analytics, Posterior Analytics, Topics, and Sophistical Refutations) and the Metaphysics, Aristotle developed the classical Three Rules of Thought, without which even basic communication would be nearly impossible:

  1. The law of identity: every thing is the same as itself and different from other things. A is the same as A; A is distinct from B.
  2. The law of noncontradiction: two or more contradictory statements cannot both be true in the same sense at the same time. If we claim that x equals 1 and that x also equals 2, something has gone wrong.
  3. The law of the excluded middle: either a statement is true or it’s false.

If these laws seem totally self-evident, that’s part of their force. From Euclid and Pythagoras on, most technical proofs have started with universally accepted premises (axioms) and moved through valid steps (premises) to reach nonobvious conclusions. The Rules of Thought sound fundamental enough to be axioms, but they’re really rules of inference: principles that govern whether a move from one premise to another is valid. That means that, in the Aristotelian framework, they’re raw tools we can use to determine what’s true.

(By now it’s becoming clear why, agree or disagree, Aristotle can’t be avoided: if you try to demonstrate that something’s true, you’re almost certainly taking part in Aristotelian logic.)

What does this mean for theology?

Christianity is concerned with truth; it’s little wonder that Aristotle’s framework has proved influential.

Aristotle was also the one behind the deduction and induction you kind of remember from high school. A refresher: deduction moves from the general to the specific; induction moves from the specific to the general. So if Aristotelian induction lets you work from an specific observed aspect of the world to a general claim about science, it also lets you work from a specific observed aspect of the world to a general claim about God. (In that sense, the watchmaker argument—that the universe, like an intricate watch, testifies to the hand of a creator—is inductive.) If Aristotelian deduction lets you work from an axiom to a specific claim, it lets you work from the Bible to the particulars of theology.

Aristotle’s main influence on Christianity has been through Thomas Aquinas, who convinced the church that Aristotle’s methods were preferable to those of Plato. Aquinas established five famous proofs of God’s existence, and three in particular build on Aristotle’s logic:

  1. First Mover, which comes directly from Aristotle’s Physics: If all motion is caused by some prior force, and if the world is filled with motion, where did the first motion come from? (From God.)
  2. First Efficient Cause: If all situations have a cause, what do we make of the cause at the start of it all? (It is God.)
  3. Necessary Being: Not all things in the world are merely possible; some are necessary. A necessary thing can be caused by another necessary thing, but that introduces the infinite regress invoked by the previous two proofs; there must be something that is necessary in itself. (That thing is God.)

These ancient arguments remain influential and popular with apologists like William Lane Craig. Of course, apologetics is more than just logic. It’s also rhetoric—argument—and Aristotle has much to teach on that as well . . . but we’ll leave that for another post.

Learn from the father of logic

Aristotle wasn’t a Christian thinker, but his works are tremendously important. Noet offers Aristotle’s core arguments in the 12-volume Works of Aristotle Collection—the Organon, the Metaphysics, and more. What’s more, the Noet editions let you study in ways that the ancient Greeks could only dream of: when Aristotle argues against Plato, you can jump directly to Plato’s arguments; when modern apologists cite Aristotle or the Three Rules of Thought, you can see the evidence for yourself.

If you’re interested in truth and logic, this collection is a gem.

Understand the building blocks of logic: pick up the Works of Aristotle Collection today.

 
Or get an even better deal: go with Noet’s Ancient Philosophy Bundle, which also gives you the dialogues of Plato.

These 4 Pre-Pubs Are About to Ship—Don’t Miss Out!

Logos’ Pre-Publication program lets you pre-order new resources at amazing discounts. Not only will you get new books for less—you’ll get them the instant they’re released! Some products don’t spend much time in Pre-Pub, though, so keeping an eye on the Pre-Pub page is always a good idea.

Here are a few Pre-Pubs shipping in the next couple weeks:

john-laurence-von-mosheim-collectionJohn Laurence von Mosheim Collection

Pre-order it for 25% off!

John Laurence von Mosheim revolutionized the way church histories are written: rather than taking history at face value and narrating a simple trajectory of unquestioned happenings, he scrutinized events from every angle. Mosheim is credited with bringing biblical scholarship a new standard of research and impartiality. Now you can pre-order his remarkable histories for 25% off!

Zondervan Textbook Bundle

Pre-order it for 24% off!

The Zondervan Textbook Bundle provides everything a first- or second-year Bible-college student needs. Spanning Christian history, philosophy, ethics, New and Old Testament studies, and spiritual formation, these texts have established themselves as standards in their fields. Whether you’re a professor, a pastor, a student, or an interested layperson, you’ll get introductory access to college-level curricula.

select-works-of-geerhardus-vos

Select Works of Geerhardus Vos

Pre-order it for 19% off!

Geerhardus Vos is perhaps the most influential Reformed theologian of the early nineteenth century, thanks to his teachings at Princeton Theological Seminary and his timeless writings. These 14 volumes represent the majority of his life’s work, demonstrating his thorough knowledge of biblical theology, eschatology, exegesis, and interpretation.

Modern Studies on the Incarnation

Pre-order it for 35% off!

The Modern Studies on the Incarnation collection presents many of the most important late-nineteenth- and early-twentieth-century studies on the Incarnation of Christ. Thanks to notable authors like Charles Gore, J. Armitage Robinson, and Charles Augustus Briggs, the collection interprets, translates, and contextualizes the Incarnation and related topics. These 26 volumes and 8,000-plus pages have had an enduring impact on our understanding of the union of divinity with humanity in Jesus Christ.

You won’t be able to pre-order these resources much longer. Make sure you get the best price: pre-order them today!

Save on Church History Resources during May

history-of-jerusalem-collectionNational history is among the first things we learn in school. It helps us understand why things are the way they are, and what those who came before us went through to get us here. The same is true of church history: the better we understand our roots, the better we understand the present.

Here are a few historical-studies resources on sale this month:

1. History of Jerusalem Collection

Regularly $299.95—get it for $65.95

How did Jerusalem emerge as an important theme in the Old Testament, and what are its implications for modern interpretation? Understanding Jerusalem’s past is important, and the History of Jerusalem Collection gives you the big picture. You’ll get contributions from an impressive list of scholars: Philip R. Davies, Lester L. Grabbe, Thomas L. Thompson, and more than a dozen others.

2. Early Church History Collection

Regularly $115.99—get it for $87.95

The Early Church History Collection gives you primary sources from the first 400 years of Christianity. You’ll see how the early church prayed and sang, how early Christians worshiped and preached, and what they held as fundamental to their faith. You’ll also learn how the church was affected by persecution and heresy, how it shaped and was shaped by the surrounding culture, and why it was so important that the church formulate proper doctrines of the Trinity and of Christ.

3. Romans through History and Culture Series

Regularly $119.95—get it for $87.95

The Romans through History and Cultures Series features a wealth of information on the reception of the book of Romans—specifically, its the past and present impact on theology and on cultural, political, social, and ecclesial life. If you’re interested in the intersection between Scripture and culture, you’ll find these scholarly volumes fascinating.

These aren’t the only products on sale this month! Check out all of May’s deals.

Get a Behind-the-Scenes Look at Logos 5

Logos 5Logos 5 is more than a library. It’s a set of unique tools that allow you to study the Bible in ways you never dreamed of.

To get a behind-the-scenes look at the origins of some of Logos 5’s features, we asked Sean Boisen, director of content innovation, and Ryan, software developer, to talk about the work their teams do.

Boisen explains,

“We try to imagine the things that don’t exist in print that would enrich Bible study. The question for us is, What is there that we can put together that didn’t start life as a book and doesn’t necessarily make sense as a book? And the example I always give people is telephone directories. When was the last time you picked up a paper telephone directory to look up somebody’s phone number? You don’t. Not because there’s not enough to go around—someone still drops them off at our house at least twice a year. But I don’t ever read those because that’s a lousy way to look up somebody’s phone number. You don’t want to read it; it’s a reference book. You want to find the one thing you’re looking for in this large body of material. And so in part, for us, it’s thinking about what are the other kinds of phone books, if you will, that Logos users need.”

Just as cell phones and the Internet have given us easier ways to find exact contact information, Boisen and his team are working to provide ways for people to find exactly what they need in the biblical text.

“We have long had the Biblical People feature, [which] ties together people in the biblical text. For many people, this is a challenge, because it’s not organized like a textbook. It’s just a bunch of different stories, written by different people in different circumstances. And so it’s often hard, I think, for people to find the thread that goes through the story and make more sense out of it. Because it’s not our time, it’s not our culture.

“The best comparison I’ve heard is that it’s a lot like reading The Lord of the Rings. There are all these people you’ve never heard of, they’re traveling around this land you don’t know anything about, and they’re bumping up against all these strange circumstances. And I think there are a lot of people reading the Bible like that. There’s just all this weird stuff, and so how do we help them make sense of it all?”

Boisen and his team work to create tools that help overcome the difficulties we all face in seeing the connections throughout Scripture. One of the results of their work is the consolidated Bible Facts tool in Logos 5.

Ryan explains,

“Having a lot of information about people, places, and things in the Bible is great. We decided that it would be even greater to combine that information in one area so that it’s easy to navigate to everything related to your area of interest at once. Combining three tools into one also allowed us to easily integrate a fourth type of data. Now, when you open Bible Facts, you get immediate access to People, Places, Things, and (now) Events.”

Have you ever wished you could quickly access information and resources on every person, place, thing, and event in the Bible? With Logos 5’s Bible Facts tool, you’ll get more than just definitions. You’ll get key passages, illustrations and photos, and relevant articles. You’ll be able to view any person’s family tree, see their roles in biblical events, and discover relationships you never knew about.

Find the answers you need with the Bible Facts tool. Get a custom discount on Logos 5 today!

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