Stanley Hauerwas: Time Magazine’s Choice for America’s Best Theologian

Stanley Hauerwas, preeminent theologian and Gilbert T. Rowe Professor of Theological Ethics at Duke Divinity School, is one of the best-regarded theologians alive today. A protégé of John Howard Yoder, Hauerwas takes his theological platform into the interdenominational conversation. Engaging with the theologies of Karl Barth and Hans Wilhelm Frei, Hauerwas brings lively discourse into the realm of contemporary theology. If you’re interested in cutting-edge theological trends, you can’t afford to be unaware of Stanley Hauerwas.

A Nonviolent Faith

John Howard Yoder’s influence can be found throughout Hauerwas’ theology. Hauerwas’ political-theological ideology, as well as his call for peace in a warlike nation, will challenge your ideas about war and nationalism. In Performing the Faith: Bonhoeffer and the Practice of Nonviolence, Hauerwas presents Dietrich Bonhoeffer as a voice for nonviolence. In War and the American Difference: Theological Reflections on Violence and National Identity, Hauerwas shows how American national identity is often at odds with American faith. How did C. S. Lewis and Martin Luther King Jr. live out their faith in days of social upheaval and war? How did they distinguish between national identity and their identity in Christ?

Postliberal Theology and You

Perhaps the most intriguing aspect of this collection is Hauerwas’ investigation into the emerging postliberal theology (or narrative theology). At the forefront of this theology is Hauerwas himself, whose work draws from, and identifies with, many interdenominational perspectives, challenging those who walk all manner of Christian disciplines to consider the ecclesiology of a cross-centered church. Is there a harmony between evangelical Protestantism and Roman Catholicism? How has this theology arisen from Lutherans, Methodists, Catholics, and Anglicans, and what does this mean for the rest of us? With the Grain of the Universe is where Hauerwas brought this discussion to the table; now see how it has advanced with Hauerwas’ latest, Postliberal Theology and the Church Catholic.

Discover for yourself why Time magazine named Hauerwas “America’s Best Theologian. Snatch up this excellent collection while it’s still on sale in Pre-Pub.

4 More Days to Download August’s Free Book!

If you’ve been downloading the Free Books of the Month since the promotion started, you’ve added eight new titles to your library by now—a $125+ value! You’ve also had eight chances to win entire collections from each of the authors.

If this is the first you’ve heard of Free Book of the Month, don’t worry. There’s still four days to pick up August’s free book: The Epistle to the Hebrews by Brooke Foss Westcott.

Westcott, a British bishop, biblical scholar, and theologian, served as bishop of Durham from 1890 until his death in 1901. He studied at Trinity College, Cambridge, from which he graduated in 1848. Staying on at Trinity, he obtained his fellowship in 1849 and was ordained as deacon and priest. He went on to receive honorary degrees from Oxford (1881) and Edinburgh (1883).

He was the author of numerous works, including four volumes in the fourteen-volume Classic Commentaries on the Greek New Testament, which you can enter to win now at August’s Free Book of the Month page.

If you haven’t downloaded August’s Free Book of the Month, get it now. And while you’re at it, enter to win the Classic Commentaries on the Greek New Testament, worth nearly $200!

Save on Walter Brueggemann While You Still Can!

Many of you have asked for it, and now it’s finally here! The Walter Brueggemann Collection, which contains 24 of Walter Brueggemann’s most famous works, has arrived on Pre-Pub, and it’s on special discount for the next eight days only!

Who Is Walter Brueggemann?

Renowned Old Testament scholar Walter Brueggemann is one of modern America’s most prominent theologians. He challenges readers to consider the messages of the Old Testament as more relevant than the philosophies and ideas we struggle with today—postmodernism, agnosticism, consumerism. On this ground, few scholars have brought the Old Testament into contemporary relevance as cleanly as Brueggemann. His research is at the intersection of philosophy and sociology, where he explores the societies and communities of ancient Israel and how their religious beliefs and practices shaped the world around them.

If you don’t have Walter Brueggemann in your library, then it’s time to wipe the dust off your keyboard and dive into contemporary Old Testament scholarship! Some of his chief works in this collection include:

Prophecy, Poetry, and Psalms

One of the defining characteristics of Brueggemann’s exposition is his love for the prophetic nature of the Old Testament as found in unexpected and overlooked places, such as 1 & 2 Samuel, Psalms, and the Pentateuch. The prophetic hope—that one day a Savior might come and redeem Israel—permeates Scripture, and Brueggemann has left no Ebenezer unturned in his exegetical search for this Redeemer.

His research will lead you through the Psalms, where he sets new paths for exploring theology and evangelism. This collection contains no fewer than three of his works on the Psalms, and any one of them might surprise you—his passion for prayer, praise, and poetry shines through his exegesis, as though having the same purpose as the Psalms themselves. In fact, we included some books on Brueggemann’s prayers and his early thoughts on the poetry and artistry of preaching the Gospel.

This low price on Walter Brueggemann won’t last!

The low price of $299.95—it would cost you nearly $600 to buy all 24 books in printwill go up September 5, so pre-order while the collection is at the lowest price!

Logos 4: Visual Filter for the Greek Words Translated Temple

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris, who has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos seminars, provides many training materials.

In an ideal world, you and I would masterfully read Hebrew and Greek, the Bible’s original languages. If you’re like I am, though, you’re thankful for and dependent on English translations of the Bible. When reading our English Bibles, however, we must always keep in mind that the same English word could be the translation of various Hebrew or Greek words. For example, Mark 14:49 and 14:58 both refer to the temple, but two different Greek words are being translated by the one English word, temple.

Can Logos help identify different original words behind the same English word? Thankfully, the answer is yes. A Visual Filter can “read” the underlining Hebrew or Greek word and then highlight the English translation any way we like.

  • Open a Bible containing the reverse interlinear option (such as the ESV, NASB, LEB, or NKJV) to a passage like Mark 14:49.
  • Right-click the word temple. (1)
  • Select Lemma “the Greek word” | Search this resource. (2)
  • Click Make Filter on the search panel that just opened with results. (3)
  • Name the Visual Filter that opened. (4)
  • Click the Formatting drop-down list to the right of the Greek search string. (5)
  • Select a highlighting style, such as Double Box. (6)
  • Navigate in the Bible to a different passage, like Mark 14:58. (7)
  • Right-click the word temple. (8)
  • Select Lemma “the Greek word” | Search this resource. (9)
  • Copy–paste the entire search string from the Search panel to the Find box in the Visual Filter panel. (10)
  • Click the Formatting drop-down list to the right of the Greek search string that was just pasted. (11)
  • Select a highlighting style, such as Box. (12)

Return to the Bible. The word temple (hieron) in Mark 14:49 should have a double box around it and the word temple (naos) in Mark 14:58 should have a single box around it! Try doing this for the different Hebrew words translated praise or sing and the different Greek words translated love, life, or poor.

Of course, we still have to investigate the meaning of each original word, but this Logos feature helps us not automatically assign the same meaning to an English word every time we see it in the Bible.

Win a Scholar’s Library from Faithlife

The minds behind the world’s most advanced study Bible want to strengthen your ministry by giving you comprehensive tools for biblical study. Enter now and you could win a Scholar’s Library base package from Faithlife. This grand prize will add more than 475 books and commentaries—worth nearly $8,000 in print—to your library. When you combine the Scholar’s Library with the powerful Faithlife Study Bible, you have the raw materials for profound Bible study.

By itself, the Faithlife Study Bible equips you for dynamic Bible study. You start with the complete biblical text in the trustworthy Lexham English Bible translation and then add:

  • Three layers of study notes—go deeper into the meaning of the text.
  • The Lexham Bible Dictionary—learn from more than 2,700 articles.
  • Rich media—augment your study with tons of photos, videos, and infographics.
  • Community Notes—share favorite verses, thoughts, and questions with your church, small group, etc.
  • Reading plans—read through the Bible with groups.
  • Devotions—reflect on the Faithlife Study Bible’s daily devotionals.
  • Smart searches—find what you’re looking for when you need it.
  • Highlighting—customize your notes with more than 80 colors and symbols.
  • Document sharing—share notes, lesson plans, outlines, and more with your groups.

Enter the giveaway now!

Get the Faithlife Study Bible free through March, 2014.

Knox DMin Classes Kick Off in Bellingham, WA

Dr. Samuel Lamerson

You’ve probably heard about Knox Theological Seminary’s DMin in Preaching and Teaching. It’s an amazing opportunity to learn world-class theology while mastering the world’s best Bible study software.

The first round of classes kicked off in Bellingham, WA, August 13! If you missed the first classes, though, you don’t have to wait for the DMin program to start over. One of the wonderful things about the program is that the classes run cyclically. You can start the program anywhere in the cycle and be on track to earn your doctorate in three years.

Here’s a rundown of the first two classes that students attended:

Enriching Preaching through Logos Bible Software

This course introduces students to a foundation of sound exegetical competence upon which to build an effective teaching and preaching ministry. Developed to teach pastors and teachers the latest software tools in exegetical analysis, this class stresses both skill and time efficiency. Students learn to use Logos Bible Software as a resource—a source of thousands of illustrations and sermon texts to enrich biblical teaching. The class develops the timeless principles of classical rhetoric, as first identified by Aristotle, to give structure and force to students’ messages.

This class is taught by Dr. Samuel Lamerson, whose teaching philosophy can be expressed in this Yeats quotation: “Education is not the filling of a pail, but the lighting of a fire.” Dr. Lamerson seeks to light a fire in his students causing them to become lifelong students of God’s Word. He uniquely combines academic research and teaching with 16 years of pastoral experience, ranging from senior pastor to director of children’s ministries.

The Art of Exegetical Theology in Preaching

Dr. Warren Gage

Moving beyond textual analysis, this course helps students look at the totality of the biblical canon’s structure. Students look to the iconic aspect of the text, developing an awareness of form and a sense of symbol. Exploring the redemptive message of the Bible as story, students learn to tell the story of heaven’s bridegroom, who came to slay the great, red dragon, to rescue his beloved, and to take her to the palace of his father, the king.

Instructor Dr. Warren Gage believes that students should be trained to preach the Word, be prepared in season and out of season to correct, rebuke, and encourage, with great patience and careful instruction (2 Tim. 4:2–3). Passionate about biblical theology, Dr. Gage relishes the opportunity to prepare Knox students for the highest of all callings—the Gospel ministry of our lord Jesus Christ.

Get Started on Your Doctorate Today

The next classes will be held in October in Ft. Lauderdale, FL.

  • The Art of Exegetical Theology in Preaching—October 15–19 
  • Biblical Theology and Preaching That Inspires—October 22–26

Deadline to apply is September 19, so apply now and save your seat for the next round of classes!

Save Now on Our Most Popular Resources!

Summer’s coming to a close, and you know what that means—people everywhere are getting ready to go back to school. If you’re looking for the best prices on the finest academic resources, Logos has you covered! Whether you’re a student or not, our Back to School Sale will help you save big on some of our most popular resources.

Here’s just a few of the amazing resources and amazing prices you’ll find:

The New International Commentary on the Old Testament (23 vols.)

Retail: $899.95 

Only $689.95 with Coupon Code B2SNICOT

The NICOT has long been the gold standard in Old Testament exegesis. Such authors as Gordon Wenham, Bruce Waltke, Tremper Longman III, and Daniel Block make this a must-have series.

New International Commentary on the New Testament (21 vols.)

Retail: $879.95 

Only $679.95 with Coupon Code B2SNICNT

Begun in the late 1940s by an international team of New Testament scholars, the NICNT series has earned pastors’, students’, and scholars’ acclaim as a critical yet orthodox commentary marked by solid biblical scholarship within the evangelical Protestant tradition.

Baker Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament (15 vols.) 

Retail: 699.95

Only $449.95 with Coupon Code B2SBECNT

The BECNT is one of today’s most respected sources for New Testament exegesis. Praised for its insightful scholarship, the BECNT is an essential exegetical commentary for any Bible study library.

That’s Not All!

We have more savings in store for you. Take a look at the Back to School Sale now for deep discounts on valuable resources!

Know Your Way around Israel? Lead a Tour!

A couple of months ago, we mentioned upcoming Israel tours and asked for input on various tour models. (If you haven’t already, help us design these tours—go ahead and take the survey now!) From the survey results so far, we’ve noticed that the majority of you are interested in scholar-led tours.

These tours will be led by experts in Israel’s history and geography. The guides will provide information and insight as they lead you through the Holy Land’s most memorable and significant locations—the Mt. of Beatitudes, Qumran, and more.

Interested in Leading a Tour?

Are you proficient in, and knowledgeable about, Israel’s history? Have you traveled to the Holy Land multiple times? We might want you to help lead Israel tours! If you fall into these categories and are interested in leading one of the tours, send us an email at faithlifetours@logos.com. If you know someone that fits this description, encourage them to contact us, too.

We’re excited to hear from you!

And if you haven’t already, go to FaithlifeTours.com and sign up for the Faithlife Tours email list to be the first to know when the site launches!

4 Reasons Jürgen Moltmann Stands Out

It had been a long year. My family and I had weathered an unexpected and unwanted move, an expected and joyous birth, and a tragic and violent death. The year was a rollercoaster of extreme highs and lows. I was tired and hanging by a thread. Nevertheless, a new year brought new possibilities.

As I often do in times of trial, I turned to my theological teachers. This new year would be “My Year with Jürgen.” I set myself to reading or rereading the German theologian Jürgen Moltmann’s most important contributions to theology. I chose Moltmann for his clarity, insight, and deep reverence for God. He is a kindred spirit who has looked deeply into this earth’s pain and struggles and seen a world entirely embraced by God’s passionate love. We can live with the sure hope that “God will be all in all” (1 Corinthians 15:28).

Born in 1926 and raised in a secular family, Moltmann had a conversion of faith during World War II: In 1944, he was drafted into military service for the German army. He subsequently took his first opportunity to surrender to a British soldier. While a prisoner of war, he was given a copy of the New Testament and Psalms and was converted. Following the war, Moltmann took an active interest in theology and studied in Göttingen. He rose to prominence in 1964 with his epoch-making Theology of Hope, a theological tour de force that has redefined eschatological discourse in biblical and theological studies for the last half century. In the years following, Moltmann continued to write and teach, and he is widely recognized as one of today’s most significant theological minds. In the New Dictionary of Theology, well-known New Testament scholar Richard Bauckham describes Moltmann’s two earliest works, Theology of Hope and The Crucified God, as, respectively, “one of the most influential theological works of the post-World War II era” and “one of the most important modern studies of the cross.”

While the eschatology of Theology of Hope and the Christology of The Crucified God stand as Moltmann’s best-known contributions to theology, his overall program has several important contours.

1. Moltmann Is Eschatological

Strictly speaking, Theology of Hope is not a systematic treatment of the last things. Instead, it is the orienting of all theology toward eschatology. The resurrection of Jesus Christ is God’s promise for the world’s future. It opens us up to an eschatological hope. It was not until the Grawemeyer Award–winning The Coming of God arrived, in 1995, that Moltmann directly addressed the content of Christ’s coming. Eschatology is the matter of hope for God and God’s glory. It’s hope for the world’s new creation, for humans’ history with the earth, and for humans’ resurrection and eternal life.

2. Moltmann Is Christological

If the resurrection opened the Church toward God’s future, it is the cross and its expression of suffering love that opened the world up to God’s act of loving solidarity with all who suffer. The Crucified God describes the cross of Jesus Christ as an event within God in which Jesus experiences a Godforsaken death and the Father experiences the loss of his son. In the resurrection, this vicarious death brings life. Thus Moltmann is able to write, “The Cross is not and cannot be loved. Yet only the crucified Christ can bring the freedom which changes the world because it is no longer afraid of death.”

3. Moltmann Is Trinitarian

Moltmann is thoroughly Trinitarian in his approach. This is made explicit in the powerful demonstration of a social trinity in The Trinity and the Kingdom. More so, Moltmann is Trinitarian in method. His contributions to systematic theology do not follow the rigid delineation of theological topics found in textbooks. Typically, Moltmann takes a topic such as creation, eschatology, or the crucifixion and asks, “what does this mean for the person and life of the Triune God?”

4. Moltmann Is Pastoral

On occasion, modern theology is criticized for not being practical enough. This charge simply does not stick with Moltmann. Deeply influenced by World War II, the social revolutions of the ’60s, the growing ecological crisis of the ’80s, and Latin American liberation theologies, Moltmann understood the theological and the ethical as deeply intertwined. This is most evident in his most recent work, The Ethics of Hope. In some ways, The Ethics of Hope is a summation of his career up to this point. It gathers together nearly 50 years of teaching and writing and presents it in an ethical framework significant to individuals, churches, and governments.

You can get the best price right now on the new 22-volume Jürgen Moltmann Collection. The price will be going up to $319.95 on August 31, 2012. This is your chance to save $50—pre-order now!

Logos 4: Custom Keyboard Shortcuts for Highlighting

mp|seminars Tips Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris, who has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos seminars, provides many training materials.

I’ve answered several emails related to the Logos Highlighting tool. This mark-up feature allows for user-created shortcuts, which save tons of time if you do a lot of highlighting. In case you’re not familiar with this time-saving tip, here’s how to create your shortcuts:

  • Choose Tools | Highlighting.
  • Click the arrow to the left of any pallet, such as Highlighter Pens.
  • Rest the cursor on the name of a style, such as Blue Highlighter.
  • Click the arrow drop-down list that appears to the right of the style name (A).
  • Click the Shortcut key drop-down list (B).
  • Click any letter, such as B for Blue Highlighter (C).
  • Repeat these steps for additional styles.
  • Close the Highlighting panel.
  • Select text in a resource.
  • Press a newly created shortcut keystroke, such as B for the Blue Highlighter.
  • Notice that your selected text is now highlighted in blue!

Highlighting-shortcut.jpg

I encourage you to create shortcuts for the styles you use most often. This way you can read, select text, and press one key to mark it up. You don’t have to keep returning to the Highlighting panel and clicking a specific style.

If you enjoyed this tip, please check out Timesaving Tips volumes 1 and 2.