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Logos 5: Search for Bible Facts in a Biblical Passage

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris, who has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos seminars, provides many training materials.

Bible Facts, located in the Tools menu in Logos 5, helps us investigate the Bible’s people, places, things, and events. You’ve probably discovered that you can enter text in its reference box to generate a report on a person, place, thing, or event.

You can also enter a biblical reference!

For example, imagine you’re studying Exodus 14, and you’d like to get an overview of that chapter’s people, places, things, and major events. Here’s all you do:

  • Choose Tools | Bible Facts
  • Type Exodus 14 in the reference box (A)
  • Note the dropdown list that appears, with all the subject matter from that chapter (B)
  • Select an item in the list to generate a report on it

I don’t know about you, but I like not having to type much!

 

Logos 5: Timeline Filter

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris, who has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos seminars, provides many training materials.

One of the new Logos 5 datasets (contained in most base packages) is the Timeline, housed in the Tools menu. The hyperlinked Timeline contains events from both biblical and world history.

Currently, the dataset contains over 8,000 events (A), which can make for a cluttered display, especially if you’re looking for a specific event. This is why Logos includes a Filter box (B), allowing you to limit the displayed events. The box works very similarly to a search.

timeline filter image

For example, type:

    • Jacob to display only events containing the word Jacob

timeline filter image 2

    • Jacob OR Esau to display only events containing either the word Jacob or the word Esau

timeline filter image 3

    • Jacob AND Esau to display only events containing the words Jacob and Esau

timeline filter image 4

    • Jacob ANDNOT Esau to display only events containing the word Jacob but not the word Esau

timeline filter image 5

You can also use Find to jump to a specific event:

    • Press Ctrl + F or Cmd + F to open the Find box
    • Type a word in the box, like Isaac (A) 

timeline filter image 6

  • Notice that an event containing the word Isaac is centered in the Timeline
  • Use the previous & next arrows to jump to other events with the word Isaac

Please notice the difference between Filter and Find:

  • Filter limits the number of events currently being displayed on the Timeline
  • Find jumps to an event currently being displayed on the Timeline

You can use the Find feature by itself, or while you’re using the Filter box as well!

To learn more about the Timeline and all the other new Logos 5 features, check out the What’s New in Logos 5 training DVD, now available on Pre-Pub.

Logos 5: Back and Forward Keystrokes

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris, who has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos seminars, provides many training materials.

Navigating in Logos 5

Sometimes we need to retrace our steps in Logos. For example, perhaps Nave’s Topical Bible is open to an article on sanctification, and we jump to the entry on holiness. (A)

Nave's image 1

Now we want to return to the previous article. No worries. We can use the back and forward arrows in the upper-right-hand corner to relive our local history in this panel. (B)

Nave's image 2

Our reports created with guides, however, present a different challenge. Imagine we generated an Exegetical Guide report for Ephesians 3.17. (C)

Exegetical Guide image 1

Now, we create a report for Galatians 2.20. (D)

Exegetical Guide image 2

For whatever reason, we want to return to the Ephesians 3.17 report. You’ll notice that there are no back and forward arrows on the Exegetical Guide panel. Again, no worries. Our guides still keep track of the local history; we just have to access it with these keystrokes:

PC
Back: Alt + left arrow
Forward: Alt + right arrow

Mac
Back: Cmd + left bracket
Forward: Cmd + right bracket

In other words, in the above example, while in the Galatians 2:20 report, press Alt + left arrow or Cmd + left bracket and you’ll return to the Ephesians 3.17 report!

What’s a Lemma, and How’s It Used in Bible Study?

The word “lemma” shows up everywhere in original-language books and tools, including Logos 5 features—but what is a lemma?

Lemma

Obviously, it’s a key concept when it comes to digging deeper in Bible study.

So What Is a Lemma, Anyway?

A lemma is the dictionary term for the word you’re looking up. If you were to look up the word “jumping” in an English dictionary, you wouldn’t find it as a headword. What you would find is “jump,” the word that represents “jump,” “jumping,” “jumped,” and “jumps.” In this case “jump” is the lemma.

What’s So Important about Lemmas in Bible Study?

Because Logos ties biblical words to their lemmas, you can search the Bible by a word’s meaning, not just by the word itself.

For example, let’s say I’m studying Mark 4:35–41. In this passage, Jesus and his disciples set sail across the Sea of Galilee. A violent storm arises and threatens to sink the boat. Jesus then says to the wind and sea, “Hush, be still” (NASB), and the storm immediately calms.

The word “hush” in verse 39 is interesting to me, probably because other translations (like the ESV and KJV) use the word “peace” instead. I wonder, “how is this word used in the rest of the New Testament?” I have my Reverse Interlinear panel open in Logos 5, so I see two Greek words listed under “hush.”

Lemma II

But if I look up the lemma, I can find all the different forms tied to the lemma. I can right-click the word “hush,” and run a Bible Word Study report on the lemma right from my Bible . . .

Lemma III

. . . and see the verb used in six different ways across the New Testament!

Lemma IV

 

A lemma is the basic dictionary form of the word you’re interested in, and it’s your ticket to a deeper understanding of the text you’re studying.

Upgrade to Logos 5 now!

With Logos 5, you have the most cutting-edge features available for Bible study. Upgrade now and see how you can take your word studies to the next level. But hurry—introductory discounts expire February 4.

Logos 5: Lexham Bible Dictionary

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris, who has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos seminars, provides many training materials.

In addition to working with numerous publishers to make their print volumes into ebooks, Logos publishes its own resources under the Lexham brand. You may have noticed resources like:

  • Lexham English Bible
  • Lexham Hebrew Bible
  • Lexham Greek-English Interlinear New Testament: SBL Edition (try rapidly repeating that title three times!)

Another very helpful resource contained in all the new Logos 5 base packages is the Lexham Bible Dictionary (LBD). This topical encyclopedia, developed for digital rather than print delivery, contains thousands of in-depth articles covering a multitude of biblical subjects. In addition, new articles are being written and added to the book through Logos’ automatic “update resources” process.
If you’ve yet to discover and use this volume, try this:

  • Open your library 
  • Click Prioritize (A)
  • Type LBD in the library’s Find box (B)
  • Drag the resource from the left to the Prefer these resources list on the right (C) so that the LBD is the highest-prioritized English dictionary in the list
  • Close the library (D)

 

  • Open a Bible to a passage, such as Acts 18 (E)
  • Double-click a word, like Corinth in verse 1 (F) (the double click is the shortcut for the Lookup feature, which aptly means “look up my word in a dictionary”)
  • Notice that the LBD jumps to an article about Corinth (G)
     

 

As you use the LBD, you’ll discover that it arranges articles in a very user-friendly outline format so that you can easily see and navigate to specific information.

Since the LBD is relatively new, it doesn’t contain articles for every biblical subject (yet!), so make sure to prioritize your second-favorite Bible dictionary under the LBD in the library. This way, if the LBD doesn’t have an article about your topic, this backup Bible dictionary will open when you double-click a word.
Also, you can double-click words in more than just Bibles. Try double-clicking the names of people, places, and things in other resources, such as commentaries (H), and watch your Bible dictionary instantly open! (I)

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Introductory discounts for upgrading to Logos 5 end February 4. See the special pricing our Custom Upgrade Discount Calculator has for you.

Logos 5: Sense in Word by Word

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris, who has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos seminars, provides many training materials.

As you well know, many words in the English language have multiple meanings. For example, trunk could refer to an elephant’s nose, an automobile’s storage compartment, a part of a tree, or a big case for saving things. The word’s context determines its precise meaning.

The biblical languages of Hebrew and Greek are no different. Some words have multiple meanings. For example, the Greek word kosmos, usually translated world, could mean the planet Earth, the people on the planet, or the philosophy of the people on the planet. When John 3.16 declares God so loved the world, which meaning of world is correct?

In an attempt to identify the contextual meanings of Hebrew and Greek words, Logos developed the Bible Sense Lexicon, located on the Tools menu in some of the Logos 5 base packages.

Perhaps the most useful application of this feature is in the Word by Word section in the Exegetical Guide. For example:

  • Choose Guides | Exegetical Guide.
  • Type John 3.16 in the reference box. (A)
  • Press the Enter key to generate the report.
  • Navigate to the Word by Word section. (B)
  • Click the word world (C) on the right-hand side of the big gray box, which takes you to the entry for the Greek kosmos. (D)

Find Bible Sense in Word by Word

 

  • Notice the line of information called Sense (E), followed by a definition.
  • Click the link to open the Bible Sense Lexicon. (F)

Exegetical guide Bible Sense Definition

 

The Sense definition is a specific, contextual definition for the Greek kosmos. This word may have 12 different meanings, but the Content Innovation Team (CIT) at Logos believes that in John 3.16, it means world populace!

Currently the CIT has tagged the majority of Hebrew and Greek nouns, but it will be adding other parts of speech in the future. The new Sense line of information goes a long way in helping us disambiguate the meanings of biblical words.

Three cheers for the CIT!

Logos 5: Links to the Timeline

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris, who has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos seminars, provides many training materials.

Scattered throughout many Logos resources are dates of specific historical events. Logos is in the process of hyperlinking many of these dates to the new, searchable Timeline, found in most of the new base packages.

Here’s an example of how the links work:

  • Type 131 in the Command box.
  • In the drop down list, click Open 131 Christians Everyone Should Know to open this resource.
  • Type 35 in the resource’s reference box. (A)
  • Press the Enter key to jump to that page.
  • Click the Visual Filters icon (B) on the resource’s toolbar.
  • Select Timeline events.
  • In the book scroll to page 35, subsection “Here I stand.” (C)
  • Notice, in the first sentence, a blue flag (D) next to the year 1517.
  • Rest the cursor on the flag to see a popup description of the event. (E)
  • Click the blue flag (D) to open the Timeline to that specific event.
  • Notice, back on page 35, a white flag next to the year 1519. (F)
  • Click the white flag to jump to the year 1519 on the Timeline.

Links to Timeline

The blue flags in resources represent specific events on the Timeline, whereas white flags just represent dates on the Timeline with no specific events assigned to them.

Timeline

Of course, you can open the Timeline anytime you want from the Tools menu.

Logos 5: See the Names and Titles of God in Bible Facts

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris, who has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos seminars, provides many training materials.

I’ve been asked several times about an effective way to locate all the names, titles, or designations of God or Jesus or the Holy Spirit. I’m very pleased to tell you that, in Logos 5, that task is much easier. Try this suggestion (keeping in mind that this feature does not appear in all Logos base packages):

Names-of-God-in-Bible-Facts.jpg

  • Choose Tools | Bible Facts.
  • Type the word God in the reference box. (A)
  • Select God from the drop down list, or if it’s already selected, just press the Enter key to generate the report.
  • Wait patiently just a few seconds—this is an extensive search.
  • Note in the sidebar a section called REFERRED TO AS. (B)
  • Scroll through this section, taking note of the various names, titles, etc., of God used throughout the Bible!

After enjoying this list of verses, type Jesus or Holy Spirit in the box to see their designations as well.

A big thank-you goes out to the content innovation team at Logos, who manually and painstakingly tagged the Bible with all this data!

If you were a Logos 4 user and recently upgraded to Logos 5, check out all the new features in the What’s New Training Manual from MP Seminars.

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It’s time to upgrade to Logos 5. See the special pricing our Custom Upgrade Discount Calculator has for you.

Logos 5: Spreadsheet for Documents and Reports

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris, who has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos seminars, provides many training materials.

One of Logos 5′s many helpful features is the ability to arrange previously created Documents and Guide Reports in a spreadsheet in which you can easily find and open just the right one.

Try this:

  • If you haven’t already, create several documents (notes, Passage Lists, etc.), and generate various reports from the Guides menu.
  • To see and arrange these files in a spreadsheet:
    • Choose the Documents or Guides menu.
    • Note the spreadsheet that Logos automatically creates for you, with headers like Name (A), Type (B), etc.
    • Click a column header to display the files according to that category. For example, click Name (A) to list them according to the title of the document or report.
    • Click the little triangle next to Name (C) to toggle the files from ascending to descending order.

Documents menu

Now try this power-user trick:

  • Click Type (A) to group together common documents or reports. For example, clicking Type places all the Note files with one another, the Passage Guide reports together, and so on.
  • Now hold down the Shift key.
  • Click:
    • Name (B) on the Documents spreadsheet to alphabetize the files under each type.
    • Reference (C) on the Guides spreadsheet to place reports for biblical references in canonical order and reports for words or topics in alphabetical order under each type.

Guides menu

With the Shift + click you sort the grouped files!

Of course, click the name of any document or report to open it.

If you were a Logos 4 user and recently upgraded to Logos 5, check out all the new features in the What’s New? Training Manual from MP Seminars.

Logos 5: Field Search in Synonyms of the New Testament

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris, who has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos seminars, provides many training materials.

A Logos user recently asked me about two Greek synonyms, kairos and chronos, both of which are translated time or times in English Bibles. His question was two-fold:

  • Is there a specific Logos resource that explains the differences between synonyms?
  • If so, how is the resource searched?

Here’s how I replied.

The resource, Synonyms of the New Testament by Richard Trench, appears in many, but not all, of the Logos base packages. Trench, in over 100 articles, discusses subtle differences between Greek synonyms.

  • Open a Bible containing the reverse interlinear option, such as the ESV or NASB.
  • Navigate to a passage containing one or both of the Greek words (kairos and chronos), such as Acts 1.7.
  • Right-click on the word times or seasons or epochs. (A)
  • Select Lemma (B) “the word.”
  • Select Copy. (C)

 

  • Open the Synonyms of the New Testament.
  • Open the Search panel.
  • Set Basic as the type. (A)
  • Select Synonyms as the book to be searched from the resources dropdown list. (B)
  • Click the range dropdown list, which probably says All Text. (C)
  • Click the arrow to the left of Search Fields. (D)
  • Select the search field Large Text (E) (which is the title of the article in Synonyms).

  • Execute a paste (A) in the search box (B), which places the Greek word there.
  • Press the Enter key.

 

  • Notice that Logos only searches the titles of the articles (Field Search) in Synonyms, looking for your Greek word.

 

  • Click the search hit to open Synonyms to the article about the two Greek words translated time.

 

Try a field search with other resources, like Wuest’s Word Studies in the Greek NT, journals, or Bibles!

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