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Opening Two Copies of the Same Book

I received the following comment regarding my post about Logos Workspaces:

I saw your post regarding your workspace in Libronix and I had a question: How do you open the same book twice? You did this for the ESV and I can not figure it out for the life of me. Any help would be wonderful. Thanks

I suppose this really isn’t prominently documented. But in Logos Bible Software, if you hold down the SHIFT key while clicking a link, you open a new version of the target resource.

So if you see a link for a Bible reference and SHIFT+Click the reference, a new version of your preferred Bible will open if you already have a copy open. This is very handy — it means you won’t lose your place in your primary Bible window (and any linked windows) by following bunny trails.

I usually keep a second version of the ESV open, and I also mark it as the Reference Target Window (the little red book icon in the book icon bar that has the arrow pointing to itself). That way, whenever I click a Bible reference, it will jump to that specific window — and not cause any of my other linked windows to jump around.

This SHIFT+Click logic carries to opening books in general. So if you’re in My Library and do the SHIFT+Click book-opening dance, you’ll open a new copy of the book you clicked.

It’s amazing what you learn when you write a blog article. A few folks here at the office read this one and told me I was missing out — that there are all sorts of ways to open another instance of the same resource.

Some of these ways to open another copy of the same book include:

  • Window | New Window will spawn a new instance of the current window.
  • CTRL + SHIFT + N will spawn a new instance of the current window.
  • I’ve been told that in future versions of the LDLS (currently in alpha testing) will support multiple opening in the “Go”/Quick Nav box. So if you type ‘ESV’ and then ENTER, then ENTER again, two instances of the ESV will open.

Flipping through Lexicons

Rick wrote earlier about how you can go from a headword in one lexicon to another by right-clicking and executing a keylink from the headword. This is true, and a very useful feature.
But I will show you a still more excellent way …

Once you have a lexicon open to the article you want to read, the quickest way to survey other lexicons and dictionaries in your library is to use the Parallel Resource feature. Whenever you have a resource open, the Libronix DLS does a lot of work behind the scenes to cull through your library to find resources that work in roughly the same way as the one you have open.

The Go | Parallel Resources menu will show you what all these resources are, if you want to choose one randomly from the list. Or you can use the Go | Next/Previous | Resource menu options, which are duplicated on the resource window’s toolbar (big yellow arrows pointing up and down). Usually those arrows advance forward or backward in the current book, but if you hit the little black downward-pointing triangle next to each button, you’ll see a menu of options, one of which is “Resource.”
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Using the Quick Nav Bar to Open a Lexicon

Earlier, I wrote about how to set up the Quick Navigation Bar (aka, “the Go box”) to quickly open resources. It can be used to navigate to references as well, and in the Libronix DLS, just about everything is a reference. I’ll look at two in this post: citations of Bible verses, and lexicon headwords.

The Quick Navigate Bar is already set up to open Bible references. Try it: Type Ecc 12:12 into the “Go” box and hit ENTER. Some version of the Bible should open to that verse. Which version of the Bible opens on your system depends on which resource you have set as your preferred translation (Tools | Options | Keylink…).

The Quick Navigate Bar can also be set up to navigate to other kinds of references, too. It simply needs to know what kinds of citations — which data types — it should expect. I’ve added Hebrew to my Quick Nav bar so I can type Hebrew words into the “Go” box to open my favorite lexicon: 1) Go to Tools | Options | Power Tools… on the main menu; 2) Choose the Quick Navigate tab; 3) Type Bible, Hebrew into the Data Types text box; 4) OK.

Now, when you type a Hebrew lemma into the “Go” box (don’t forget to change the keyboard with F2, or by using the Keyboard Selector in the system tray at the bottom-right of the screen) your favorite lexicon will be opened to that word. What’s more, if your favorite doesn’t have that word (or doesn’t have that spelling of the word), some other lexicon that does have that word will open.

Using Keylinking to Navigate Between Greek Lexicons

When I’m working through the Greek text at the word level, many times I like to get a second opinion. My primary Greek lexicon is BDAG, which is an excellent resource, but I do like to consult others. My favorite lexicons to consult for second opinion are:

This article explains just a little bit about Greek keylinking and then shows you how to keylink from lexicon to lexicon using the keylink functionality straight from the right-click menu. No funky keystrokes involved.

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What’s a “Go” Box?

The other day, Rick Brannan mentioned the Libronix DLS “Go” box casually in passing, as if everyone has that feature turned on and knows how to use it. Since Rick and I work with LDLS resource files all the time, we often stop thinking about titles and authors and start calling books by their project names: CHAPSOT, ANLEX, BHSWTS40.

We also use the identifiers to navigate quickly to the resources using the “Go” box that Rick was talking about. This is so integral to the way that I use the LDLS that I forget that most people don’t know about these shorthand identifiers, and furthermore, many people don’t even have the “Go” box turned on in the first place.

Inconceivable!

What is it? What we’ve been calling “the Go box” is really the “Quick Navigate Bar” that comes with the Power Tools addin. That’s exactly what it lets you do: navigate to any resource in your library quickly. I use the Quick Navigate Bar to do three things: 1) Quickly open specific resources (books); 2) navigate directly to a Bible reference in my preferred Bible (when it isn’t even open yet); and 3) do the same with a Hebrew lexicon.
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Using the Works of Philo with BDAG

One thing I like to do when examining Greek word usage is to evaluate how the Greek word is used in similar context outside of the New Testament corpus.

This article will point out an easy way to use the Works of Philo (in English) in conjunction with the BDAG Lexicon. This same method can be used with other Greek corpora for which Logos Bible Software has English translations, such as the Works of Josephus (in English) or the Old Testament Pseudepigrapha.

The strategy discussed is really a temporary one as we’re currently working on versions of the following corpora in Greek, fully morphologically annotated:

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Rick’s Logos Bible Software Workspace

Logos Bible Software supports the concept of a workspace. Workspaces are used in different ways by all sorts of people. The basic idea is for the software to keep track of your window arrangement, open texts, linked windows and other stuff.

Awhile back, on my personal blog, I blogged on how I’ve got my primary workspace set up. I thought it would be fun to share that here too. Click the above link to head to the article.

I’ve had a decent amount of feedback from folks that this article helped them understand a bit more about workspaces and gave them some insights to relationships between texts. If you work in the New Testament, and if you work through the Greek word-by-word, then you may enjoy checking it out.

Using Logos to Examine NT Variants

In my morning devotional time, I’ve been reading through the Pauline Epistles in larger chunks. I tend to dwell in areas, reading the larger chunks over again, and sometimes dwelling on smaller chunks.

For the past week I’ve been in First Corinthians 12 and 13. And I’ve been dwelling on 1Co 13.1-3.

But as is my way, I’ve looked at the text in the Greek too. And I noticed some stuff from a text-critical perspective, so I thought a post on how I walk through this kind of stuff might be a good one. So, even though I’ve recently discussed some of these issues on my personal blog, in this article I’ll go into a little different detail, showing how I use Logos Bible Software in this regard.

There are two things in particular that jumped out at me when evaluating 1Co 13.1-3:

  1. The use of καὶ ἐὰν twice in v. 2, but the use of κἂν and καὶ ἐὰν in v. 3. The word κἂν is a crasis of καὶ ἐὰν. Why isn’t one or the other used consistently?
  2. The use of οὐθέν in v. 2 but οὐδὲν in v. 3. Why the different form of the word in each instance? Why isn’t one or the other used consistently?

There are a few different LDLS resources I’ll be using to examine what the textual evidence is in these situations. They are:

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Nouns and Adjectives and Graphical Queries, Oh My!

On Saturday morning I was studying the first part of 1Ti 4.6:

If you put these things before the brothers, you will be a good servant of Christ Jesus, (1Ti 4.6a, ESV)

When I was looking into the term “good servant”, I noticed that in the Greek it was an adjective and a noun that agreed in case and number. So, I wondered, what other things are called “good” in the Pastoral Epistles? This article explores ways to specify this sort of search with the Graphical Query Editor.

[I should note that I have been working through the Pastoral Epistles for some time. I blog about the Pastoral Epistles at http://PastoralEpistles.com and have some other information on my personal web site.]

This is the sort of thing that the Graphical Query Editor is designed to do without getting too bogged down in intricate search syntax. Sure, you could learn the syntax to specify it in a textual query, but it’s much more fun to make a pretty picture to specify your search query, like this:
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