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Seeing Double: How to Display Only Primary Resource Titles

A friend of mine recently emailed me the following question:

I’ve been sorting my library into collections and (several times) I’ve come across duplicate books with slightly different titles, e.g., (1) NBATLAS (New Bible Atlas) and (2) New Bible Atlas (Authors listed).
Any suggestions on how to eliminate these duplicates? I have tried the “Remove Duplicate Resources” function, but this function doesn’t seem to treat these occurrences as true duplicates.
Thanks for any help you can offer!


My friend is a very sharp guy, so I figured if he has had this question, there are probably many others who have as well.
When you see what appears to be two copies of a resource, you are probably simply seeing alternate titles for the same resource. That’s why Tools > Library Management > Remove Duplicate Resources won’t do anything. This feature is built into Libronix to make it easier to find titles in My Library, but not everyone wants to see multiple titles for their resources, so we allow you to turn this off. To set it to show only the primary title for each resource, click Tools > Options > General > Interface and check the box next to Use Only Primary Resource Titles in My Library.

Now you should see only one entry for every resource. Hope this helps!

Greek Syntax: First Thessalonians 4:16, Part IV


I’ve blogged a bit about the prepositional phrase εν Χριστω in 1Th 4.16. There are three previous posts in this series:

Today’s post, the last in the series, is a follow-up to Part II. We’ll further explore how to search for εν Χριστω in relation to the verb (predicator) that it co-occurs with; only today we’ll search for this with both adverbial (as in Part II) and adjectival instances. For those of you who can’t wait, here’s a link to the video:

In 1Th 4.16, εν Χριστω occurs before the verb, as shown below:

1Th 4.16

This instance is somewhat ambiguous (indeed, that’s the reason why the JBL article was written); there are equally good reasons for the prepositional phrase to modify the subject or the verb. OpenText.org SAGNT annotates this as an adjectival relation, further modifying the subject. In order to examine like cases, we need to find where the prepositional phrase itself (whether the OpenText.org SAGNT annotates it adjectivally or adverbially) occurs preceding the predicator. Our earlier search in Part II only located OpenText.org’s adverbial instances.
So today’s video starts there and then shows how to search for where OpenText.org’s adjectival instances precede the predicator. The combination of those two lists provides the whole set of instances where the prepositional phrase precedes the predicator.

Once the lists are available, the analysis can proceed. Examine not only the verbs, but also the other clausal components that are similar to 1Th 4.16. Which of these instances, like 1Th 4.16, appear to be genuinely ambiguous as to where the prepositional phrase can attach? And can those instances help in establishing reasons to prefer either adjectival or adverbial modification in 1Th 4.16?
Lastly, after surveying the material, you may want to do a reference search of your Greek grammars to see if any of them discuss the issue of how the prepositional phrase functions in 1Th 4.16; you may also want to check some of your commentaries (like NIGTC on Thessalonians, perhaps; or the WBC or ICC volumes if you’ve got ‘em) to see what they say.

Greek Syntax: First Thessalonians 4:16, Part III

I’ve blogged a few times about 1Th 4.16 and the prepositional phrase εν Χριστω (see here and here).

1Th 4.16

But there’s more to talk about.
One thing that could be handy is searching for when the prepositional object (Χριστω) is articular, and when it is anarthrous. Our initial search for the prepositional phrase found both articular and anarthrous instances.
But in tracking how εν Χριστω functions, it may be necessary to consider articular and anarthrous instances separately. With syntax searching, you can do this. I’ve created a video that starts with the basic search for the prepositional phrase and adjusts it to first locate articular instances (so, εν τω Χριστω) and then to locate anarthrous instances (εν Χριστω) .

The Value of Custom Resource Associations

Two weeks ago I talked a little bit about the value of collections. To summarize, collections have two primary functions:

  1. They allow you to organize and group your books together so that they are easier to find in My Library. For example, you have a systematic theology kind of question, and you can’t remember all of the systematic theology books that you have. You could just type “Systematic Theology” in My Library, but then you’d miss Shedd’s Dogmatic Theology and many others. You could try the broader “Theology,” but then you’d probably get a lot more books than you’re really looking for (like all of the journals with “Theology” in the title) and you’d miss a book like Henry’s God, Revelation and Authority. If you create a Systematic Theology collection, you’d be able to view your entire list of available Systematic Theology resources without missing any and without weeding through resources that don’t belong.
  2. They also allow you to improve the way you search. Searching collections is the ideal way to search for two reasons: accuracy and speed. (1) You’ll get hits that are more likely to address your question without having to wade through lots of false hits, and (2) your search will take far less time than if you are searching your entire library.

Resource Associations
Today I’d like to talk about the value of custom resource associations. I’ve found that many users don’t know what resource associations are, how they differ from collections, what value they have, or how to set them up. I hope that the remainder of this post will help to provide some answers to questions like these.
A resource association is simply a grouping of resources that enables you to navigate easily to similar resources. There are two kinds: serial and parallel.
Serial Resource Associations
A serial resource association groups books in the same series, like commentaries in the WBC or PNTC. So if you are looking at Genesis 15:6 in Wenham’s commentary in the WBC and want to jump to Romans 4:3 in the same series to read Dunn’s comments, you can simply type Rom 4:3 in the reference box in the top left hand corner, and it will take you to the Romans commentary in the same series. Think of a serial resource association as making many resources in a series function like one big resource. For the most part, serial resource associations come included with products. You won’t normally need to create any of your own.
Parallel Resource Associations
A parallel resource association groups books that cover the same basic content. For example, you might create a resource association for all of your English Bibles, all of your Greek New Testaments, all of your commentaries on Romans, all of your Hebrew grammars, all of your Apostolic Fathers texts, etc. This allows you to jump to one of these similar resources to compare with just two mouse clicks. I find this incredibly handy for those times when I go straight to a commentary instead of running a full Passage Guide report. By clicking on the Parallel Resources button, you will get a drop down list of the other books in your association.


So here I’m looking at Galatians 3:6 in Betz’ commentary in the Hermeneia series. Clicking on The New American Commentary: Galatians will take me to the same location in George’s commentary. (You can also use your right and left arrow keys to scroll through this list, but I find that using the parallel resources button is much quicker because you can go immediately to the one you want.)
The value of using your own parallel resource associations is that only the resources that you choose will appear, making the list targeted and customized to the way you study—and they are only two clicks away.
Defining Custom Resource Associations
Setting them up is simple to do. First, make sure you have the Power Tools Addin installed (read about or watch how to download it for free). Next, click on Tools > Library Management > Define Resource Associations. Select Parallel, and then click New. I recommend sorting by Title and checking the Unlocked Resources Only box. Add all of the resources that you want in your resource association, and order them however you want (e.g., alphabetically or in order of priority). Click OK and Close, and you’re ready to use your new resource association. Create as many as you want. For more information, see the article “Define Resource Associations” in the Libronix DLS Power Tools Addin Help resource or search for it in Libronix DLS Help (F1 or Help > Libronix DLS Help). Also, check out the “Customize Your New Digital Library” training video. The applicable portion is 14:53–18:31.
Now navigating from one resource to the next will be easier than ever.
Two things you should be aware of as you create your custom parallel resource associations:
  1. A resource can be in only one parallel resource association.
  2. Adding a resource to a custom resource association will override the default associations.

External Linking to Libronix Resources and Reports

A very handy and unfortunately very underused feature in the Libronix Digital Library System is the ability to link to resources from external documents (like Word documents and PDFs) and web pages. This functionality is part of the Power Tools Addin (Tools > Options > Power Tools). If you don’t already have it, you can read about or watch how to download it for free.
Libronix allows for a much better hyperlinking experience than the web does. When you link to a web page, you usually can’t link to a specific location on that page.* For example, if you wanted someone to read a certain portion of Van Til’s “Why I Believe in God” at Reformed.org, you would have to direct him to go to the fourth section, third paragraph, etc. Not horrible, but not ideal.
In Libronix we provide far greater power and specificity in linking. You can link to a variety of different things:
(Note: These links may not work properly in all feed readers. Visit the site to try them out.)

  • Book: like the ESV
  • Page: like page 25 of The Moody Handbook of Theology
  • Topic: like “Trinity” in the New Bible Dictionary or λόγος in BDAG (a little buggy in IE)
  • Verse: like John 1:18 in the Holman Christian Standard Bible
  • Exact Location: like this quote from Charles Hodge’s Systematic Theology

And that’s not all. I just learned, thanks to Sean Boisen’s blog post “Libronix Links As Knowledge Resources,” that you can even link to most reports! So you can take someone directly to—and even run for them—any of these:

How cool is that?! And most of these links will even preserve preferences like version choice, etc. where applicable!
Some of you are already thinking of all the ways you can make use of this. Others of you might still be wondering how this would come in handy. Let me suggest a few ways:

  1. Include links to resources and reports in your digital teaching materials. If you use a computer while you teach, this will save you time by allowing you to look up sources and run reports more quickly giving you more time to spend actually teaching.
  2. Include links to resources and reports in your digital syllabi. Many universities and seminaries are now distributing syllabi as Word documents or PDFs. Having Libronix links in your material will make learning more efficient—and fun!
  3. Include links to resources and reports in your papers. This is helpful if you share your papers with others via your website or some other way digitally. If they use Libronix, they’ll be able to run down your footnotes. But perhaps it will be of most help to you. If you want to look up one of your sources to double check something or recheck the data behind your conclusion, it’s just a click away. My dissertation is full of thousands of hidden Libronix links.
  4. Include links to resources and reports in your blog posts. I regularly link to my Libronix library when blogging (e.g., see the notes section in this post).

So how do you create a link? It’s very simple. Open a resource to the location to which you want to link, click Favorites in the menu bar, then click Copy Location to Clipboard (or just use the keyboard shortcut Alt+Ctrl+C). Create your hyperlink, and you’re all set. It works the same way with most reports.
Here are a couple of articles where you can find more information about external linking to Libronix resources:

One warning about external linking and web browsers: Internet Explorer and Firefox don’t handle Libronix encoding the same way, so you may occasionally run into trouble with more complicated links (e.g., spaces are particularly problematic). A link may work in one browser but not another. In addition, Internet Explorer struggles with Greek and Hebrew, but Firefox tends to handle them properly. You shouldn’t have trouble with the simpler links, and we’re working on ways to get browsers to behave properly with the more complicated ones.
* I say usually because some pages have anchors built into them, which allows you to link to a specific section of the page, but most pages don’t have anchors and most people don’t know how to find anchor text or how to link to it.

Changing Your Font Size

A blogger lamented recently that none of the Bible software programs that he has used allow the font size to be enlarged enough so that it is readable when projected on a big screen.
We were happy to inform him that Logos works very well on a screen. A user can easily change the zoom up to 400% (= 48 pts.)—and with a simple script code all the way up to 999% (= 120 pts.)!
The default zoom for resources and reports is 100%, which is equivalent to a 12 pt. font. That may be too small depending on the size and resolution of your monitor—and depending on your purpose. Changing it is a cinch.
There are a couple of ways you can adjust your font size.

  1. All Resources: You can set all resources to use a certain zoom. Do this by going to Tools > Options > General > Text Display and selecting anywhere from 50% to 400% under the Default Zoom drop down. You probably want to leave the box checked next to Use Default Zoom Only with Resources, but test it for yourself to see what you like. You can also change the reports separately. (I have my default zoom set to 150% most of the time, but Bible Speed Search set to 125%.)
  2. Individual Resources and Reports: You can also adjust the zoom on individual resources and reports by using the Zoom icon in the toolbar or by going to View > Zoom. I recommend doing this only after you have set your default zoom. (If you want to change these later, you’ll have to do so one resource at a time! I learned that the hard way as a new user.)

Here are two other tips that some users might find helpful.
What if you want to set your default zoom to something other than what is available in the options (e.g., 135% or 500%)? With a simple script code, you can get as precise as you want.
In the following script code, replace 135 with whatever two or three digit number you want. Create a new toolbar button using the Run Script Code command. Click the button to execute the script.
Here’s the script code:
Application.UserPreferences(“LDLS/ResourceSettings”).SetValue(“Strings”,”Zoom”,”135″);
Another thing you can do is create a button that will toggle between your default zoom and another zoom. This comes in very handy if you prefer one size for a resource when it’s in a smaller window and another size when it’s maximized for reading or displaying on a screen.
To do this, create a toolbar button using the Run Script Code command and this script:
var objWindow = Application.ActiveWindow;
if ( objWindow != null )
{
if ( objWindow.Type == “resource” )
{
var objView = objWindow.View;
if ( objView && objView.IsOpen() )
{
var objDisplayPane = objView.Panes(“display”);
if ( objDisplayPane )
{
var strZoom = objDisplayPane.Control.Zoom;
if ( strZoom != “175%” )
strZoom = “175%”;
else
strZoom = “auto”;
objDisplayPane.Control.Zoom = strZoom;
}
}
}
}

Replace the 175 with whatever two or three digit number you’d like. You can create multiple buttons to use for different purposes.

Keyboard Shortcuts

A great way to become more efficient in Libronix is by using keyboard shortcuts. We’ve compiled a nearly exhaustive list of keyboard shortcuts to help you learn them. Here are a few:

  • Ctrl+L opens My Library.
  • Ctrl+Shift+G activates the Quick Navigation Bar.
  • Tab or Ctrl+G activates the text box in a resource, which you can use to jump to a reference or page.
  • Ctrl+Shift+W closes all windows.
  • Ctrl+F4 or Ctrl+W closes the active window.
  • Ctrl+Shift+C opens the contents pane.
  • The right arrow key takes you to the next resource in a resource association. Try it when you have an English Bible opened.

The best way to make these shortcuts a part of your normal use of Libronix is to go through the list and try each one. Pick a handful that you find especially helpful and start using them immediately.
In addition to the standard shortcuts, you can also create your own shortcuts for many of your favorite activities like opening a resource and applying a visual markup. Here are some examples of things I do with shortcut keys:

  • Alt+A opens my Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary.
  • Alt+D opens my default English dictionary.
  • Alt+T opens my Thesaurus.
  • Alt+E opens the ESV.
  • Alt+G opens my Greek New Testament.
  • Alt+H opens my Hebrew Old Testament.
  • Alt+N opens the New American Commentary to the passage I’m working on (if applicable).
  • Alt+W opens the Word Biblical Commentary to the passage I’m working on (if applicable).
  • Alt+B applies my blue highlighter.
  • Alt+R applies my red highlighter.
  • Alt+Y applies my yellow highlighter.
  • Alt+Z erases my highlighting or other markups.

You can assign keyboard shortcuts like these by creating a custom toolbar. I’ll get you started by showing you how to create shortcuts to open resources.

  1. Open Libronix.
  2. Right click on the toolbar area and click on Customize.
  3. Click New to create a new toolbar.
  4. Leave the Category as Special, and click on Open (Resource).
  5. Click Add, give it a name like Shortcuts, and then click on Details.
  6. Give it a name like ESV, select a style and icon, and assign a shortcut key (e.g., Alt+E).
  7. Click Change and select the resource you would like to open with your shortcut.
  8. Click OK, OK, and Close.
  9. Repeat this process to add other resources.

Feel free to hide your new toolbar by right clicking in the toolbar area and unchecking it. It doesn’t need to be visible to be active.
Here’s a brief video walking you through the steps.
Give it a try!
For other tips on being more efficient, check out our previous post on Mouse Gestures.

Changing Your English Font

Users often ask if there is a way to change the English font in Libronix. The default font is Times New Roman. If you’re like me, you have another font that you prefer. While it’s not a standard option, it is fairly easy to change your English font.
Here are the steps you will need to take:

  1. Open Libronix.
  2. Right click on the toolbar area and click on Customize.
  3. Click New to create a new toolbar.
  4. Leave the Category as Special, and click on Run Script Code.
  5. Click Add, give it a name like Change Font, and then click on Details.
  6. If you want, give it a name, select a style and icon, and assign a shortcut key.
  7. Paste the following Script Code into the box.
  8. var strFont=Application.UserPreferences(“LDLS/ResourceSettings”).GetValue(“Strings”,”Serif”);
    var strFontFamily=Application.UserPreferences(“LDLS/ResourceSettings”).GetValue(“Strings”,”StandardFontFamily”);
    strFont=”Minion Pro”;
    strFontFamily=”Serif”;
    Application.UserPreferences(“LDLS/ResourceSettings”).SetValue(“Strings”,”Serif”,strFont);
    Application.UserPreferences(“LDLS/ResourceSettings”).SetValue(“Strings”,”StandardFontFamily”,strFontFamily);

  9. Replace Minion Pro with the name of your favorite font. Be sure to use the exact name, which you can find in a program like Word.
  10. Click OK, OK, and Close.
  11. Click your new button (or use your shortcut key) to execute the script code.

That’s it. Your new font should now display. To change your font back, just edit your script code and insert Times New Roman. Create as many buttons on your new toolbar as you’d like. I choose to hide my toolbar after executing the script so that it’s not taking up toolbar space.
One caution: not all English fonts support the full range of characters used in Libronix. If you see boxes or other weird shapes, you’ve probably picked a font that’s lacking some necessary characters.
Here’s a brief video walking you through the 10 steps.
Note: you may need to view this post on a separate page to get all of the script code. Click the 06:00 AM below to do so.

Thanksgiving in the Bible Word Study Report

Since it’s Thanksgiving Day here in the U.S., I thought I’d do a little analysis of the primary thanksgiving word in Greek New Testament, the verb εὐχαριστέω, which means “thank, gives thanks to.” I’m primarily interested in getting an overview of the biblical data rather than reading what others have to say about it in lexicons and theological dictionaries (which is very valuable, but not my interest for now). So I open the Bible Word Study report, type in εὐχαριστέω, and let it do its thing.
If your Greek knowledge is limited but you want to run the report based on the Greek text rather than the English, Logos Bible Software makes that easy with the reverse interlinears. Start with the Bible Speed Search, select the ESV (or NRSV) English-Greek Reverse Interlinear New Testament from the drop down box, and type thank in the search box. You’ll get 56 hits in 53 verses. Click the reference for Matt 15:36, the second one in the list. It will open the text of the ESV NT Reverse Interlinear to the proper location. Locate the word thanks, right click it, and select Bible Word Study: “ευχαριστεω” from the list of options.
Once the report finishes, we’re given a wealth of data to examine. My interest for now is in the Grammatical Relationships section, where I can quickly find answers to questions like:

  1. Who gives thanks?
  2. Who receives thanks?
  3. What is thanks given for?

This section is incredibly helpful for quickly getting the big picture of a theme in the NT. As I look over the data, I immediately notice some noteworthy patterns in the Complements section, particularly some things that stand out to me because of my current study of the Trinity.


Of the 23 complements or objects of the verb (i.e., who is being thanked), they are nearly all God. The only human objects are Prisca and Aquila (Rom 16:3). The rest of the references are God—and arguably, God the Father. (Jesus is the object one time [Lk 17:16].) I realize that God can refer to the Triune God, but the contexts and general pattern suggest that the Father is in view.
Here are the data:
Thanks is given to
  • the Father (Col 1:11-12; cf. Jn 11:41)
  • God the Father through Jesus (Rom 1:8; Col 3:17)
  • God, the Father of our Lord Jesus Christ (Col 1:3-5)
  • God the Father in the name of our Lord Jesus Christ (Eph 5:20)
  • God [who is distinguished in the context from Christ] (Rom 14:6; 1 Cor 1:4, 14; Phil 1:3-6; 1 Thes 2:13; 2 Thes 1:3; 2:13; Phm 4-5; Rev 11:17?; cf. Lk 18:11)
  • God [who is later identified as the Father] (1 Thes 1:2-4)
  • God [undefined in the immediate context] (Acts 27:35; 28:15; 1 Cor 14:18)

So what significance does this have as we give thanks to God today (or any day)? It gives us guidance on how we are to think about and interact with our Triune God. These patterns are descriptive, and not necessarily prescriptive of whom we shouldn’t give thanks to. (The fact that we don’t find numerous references about giving thanks to Jesus or the Spirit doesn’t necessarily mean it is inappropriate to do so.) Nevertheless, these data must be the starting point for any biblical theology of giving thanks to God.
Perhaps a more devotional exercise is to reflect upon the Adjuncts section, where we find out that thanks is given

  • always (1 Cor 1:4; Eph 5:20; 1 Thes 1:2-4; 1 Thes 1:3; 2 Thes 2:13; Phm 4-5)
  • for other believers (1 Cor 1:4; 1 Thes 1:2-4; 2 Thes 1:3; 2:13)
    • because God has given grace to them (1 Cor 1:4)
    • because they are growing in faith and love (Rom 1:8; 2 Thes 1:3)
    • because God has chose them (1 Thes 1:2-4; 2 Thes 2:13)

There’s much more to explore here. Run the Bible Word Study report, and have a look for yourself. Let some of these biblical themes be the starting point for your thanksgiving today—and every day.

Thirteen New Training Videos

Those who frequently visit the Logos training videos webpage may have noticed several tags next to certain links. That’s because John Fallahee of Logos’ Ministry Relations department just added 13 new videos to our ever-expanding collection of free training content.

If you sometimes feel like you aren’t using Logos Bible Software to its full potential, the first thing we would recommend is a visit to www.logos.com/videos. Even if you have been using Logos for years, there may be new features and tools in Logos Bible Software 3 that could help you become more proficient in your Bible study.

One thing I personally enjoy about the training videos is the context they give to the use of a tool. In the same way a trained mathematician uses the proper formulas to solve an equation, using the correct tools in Libronix can greatly expedite your study. You will be able to achieve your desired result more quickly if you know how to use all the tools at your disposal.

Oh, and they’re free, too!

Here are a few of the new videos you’ll find at www.logos.com/videos:

For dozens of training videos (for everyone from new users to Logos veterans) visit www.logos.com/videos.