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Deleting Locked Resources

A couple of weeks ago I showed you how to free up some hard drive space by deleting duplicate resources. There’s another way to make even more space available: deleting locked resources.

Searching Locked Resources

Now, before I show you how to do that, I should tell you that there is actually a very good reason for keeping locked resources on your hard drive. You may not know this, but you can actually search the contents of locked resources as well. Libronix will even give you the page numbers where the hits for your search occur!

This is helpful for two reasons:

  1. If you have the book in print, you can pull it off your shelf and find exactly what you’re looking for—far more powerful and far easier to use than typical indexes, which the print book may not even have.
  2. You may find other resources that you don’t have in Libronix or in print that deal with a topic or passage that you’re studying that you might want to add to your library.

But if you don’t plan to search your locked resources and need to free up some space, you may want to delete them.

Do You Have Locked Resources?

To find out if you have locked resources on your computer, open My Library and select “All Locked Resources” under the “Collection” drop-down.

Locked resources have a yellow padlock over the book icon.

How Can You Delete Them?

There are two methods for deleting locked resources.

Method 1

If you have a smaller number of locked resources, you could run a Bibliography report (Tools > Library Management > Bibliography) and set it to “All Locked Resources” and “Titles and Locations” to find the file names and locations for all of your locked resources. You could then open your resources folder (e.g., C:\Program Files\Libronix DLS\Resources) and manually delete the locked resources you no longer want. (You may need to close Libronix in order to delete them.)

Method 2

If you have a larger number of locked resources, you may want to try this method. It does require that you have some free space, and it does take some time to run.

NOTE: This method is recommended only for advanced users.

  1. Open the Location Manager (Tools > Library Management > Location Manager) and select “Unlocked on Local Drives.” Enter a new destination that doesn’t have any files in it (e.g., C:\Program Files\Libronix DLS\Resources\Unlocked). If the folder doesn’t exist, Libronix will automatically create it. After Libronix is done generating the list of resource, click “Copy Resources.” Libronix will copy all unlocked resources to your new folder. Be patient. It may take some time. Wait until it is completely done before proceeding.
  2. Manually delete all of the resources from your original resources folder, since it contains locked and unlocked resources. To do this, open your resources folder in Windows Explorer and select all of the resources. If your new resources folder is a subfolder of your original resources folder, make sure not to delete it or any other folders (e.g., Media). Delete only the .lbxlls files.
  3. Move all of the resources from your new resources folder back to your original resources folder and delete the new resources folder.
  4. Start Libronix and open My Library. If any of your unlocked resources are grayed out, that means that you deleted some unlocked resources as well. Don’t worry. You can restore them from your Recycle Bin. If you don’t see any grayed out unlocked resources, you can proceed to Refresh Resources (Tools > Option > General > Resource Paths). All locked resources should now be gone.

Enjoy your extra space!

Getting the Most Out of the Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary

A while back someone sent me a question about how to use the Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary to the fullest.

Any good ideas on where I can go to learn how to most effectively use this dictionary in my study process? Is there a way to integrate it into the Bible Word Study selection?

Any help would be appreciated!

I sent this user some tips, but thought this might be worthy of a blog post—especially since it’s back-to-school time and we are currently offering a 30% discount on this wonderful resource. Just use coupon code YALE to save more than $60!

Setting Up Your Keylink Preferences

First, you should set up your keylink preferences. Go to Tools > Options > Keylinks and select “English” from the “Data Type” drop-down menu. Then find the Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary in the list of resources in the bottom window and “Promote” it to the top. Prioritize it wherever you’d like. If you want it to be the first resource that Libronix looks to, move it to the top of your list.

This allows you to double-click on any English word and have quick access to the AYBD entry, if there is one. (You’ll need to set AYBD as your first keylink destination or set your keylink preferences to open several keylink destinations at a time.)

This also allows you to see AYBD entries in the Bible Word Study report.

By the way, if you don’t have the updated Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary resource (formerly Anchor Bible Dictionary), you can get it by running the resource auto-update script or by downloading it directly from our FTP server.

Creating a Parallel Resource Association

You may also want to set up a custom parallel resource association of all of your Bible dictionaries and encyclopedias. This allows you to jump from the entry on “Jericho,” for example, in the AYBD to the one in other Bible dictionary like ISBE or the New Bible Dictionary by simply hitting the right arrow key. Make sure the active index is set to “Topics.”

By creating a custom parallel resource association, you get to control which resources Libronix looks to and you get to put them in whatever order you’d like.

Watch the Video!

For more tips, see our training video on Using the Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary in Logos Bible Software. It’s embedded below. If you’re reading this in your email inbox or your RSS reader and don’t see the video, visit the blog post to watch it.

To add this resource to your Libronix digital library, visit the product page. And make sure to use coupon code YALE to save 30%!

Preparing a Sermon with Logos

Pastor and Logos user Mark Barnes blogs about his process for preparing a sermon. His five steps are nicely alliterated:

  1. Divide
  2. Dissect
  3. Discover
  4. Digest
  5. Disseminate

In his very helpful post, he shows how he makes use of Logos both in the dissecting and discovering steps. He uses the sentence diagramming tool to dissect the passage.

He also uses Logos to discover the meaning of the passage. In two very helpful videos (Logos Workspace [5:00] and Logos Workspace Options [4:59]), he shows you his workspace and how he puts it to use. I’d strongly encourage you to take the time to watch them both. They are full of excellent tips and tricks.

Not only does he lay out his process, but he also walks you through it with his sermon on Amos 2:4-16 and shares the final product in both PDF and audio. Be sure to check it out.

Very nice work, Mark. Thanks for sharing!

If you use Logos in your sermon prep and would like to share your process or workspace, drop a note in the comments. We’d love to see it.

Semantic Chaining: Using Louw-Nida References in the Lexham Greek NT Interlinear

The recently-released Lexham Greek-English New Testament Interlinear has, as one of its primary distinguishing features, domain-article references to the Louw-Nida Greek Lexicon (info here, here and here). That’s all well and good, but — beyond keylinking to a specific Louw-Nida article — what can we do with the references?
One thing that you can do (shown in the below-referenced video) is begin to explore using the concept of “semantic chaining” (also known as “semantic chunks” or “semantic clustering”). The idea is to explore how a section of text (a pericope or chapter or book) uses or repeats ideas found in particular domains or domain-subdomain references.
OK, I’ll speak in English this time. You know how repeated words can be important when you’re looking at a passage? Well, Louw-Nida references let you expand that notion to repeated concepts. The theoretical backgound for this concept is well-established in the literature* but as of yet has not really been available in a consumer-level Bible study product.
But you can do it with the Lexham Greek-English Interlinear New Testament if you’ve also got the Louw-Nida lexicon (Greek-English Lexicon of the New Testament Based on Semantic Domains) and are willing to learn how to reference search using the Bible Speed Search dialog.

The video shows you how. Our sample passage is 1Ti 2.1, and our sample concept is prayer.


* Some references include:

  • Reed, Jeffrey T. A Discourse Analysis of Philippians, pp. 296-331. This book will be available in the Studies in New Testament Greek and JSNTS Collection.
  • Porter, Stanley E. and O’Donnell, Matthew Brook. “Semantics and Patterns of Argumentation in Romans: Definitions, Proposals, Data and Experiments”, pp. 154-204 in Stanley E. Porter (ed.), Diglossia and Other Topics in New Testament Linguistics. This book will be available in the Studies in New Testament Greek and JSNTS Collection.
  • Guthrie, George, The Structure of Hebrews: A Text-Linguistic Analysis.
  • Van Neste, Ray, Cohesion and Structure in the Pastoral Epistles. This book is available in the Library of NT Studies: JSNTS on Paul collection.

Tutorial Videos for Andersen-Forbes Syntax Resources

Over on his Exegetica Digita blog, Mike Heiser has been doing some tutorial videos on the Andersen-Forbes syntax resources.

  • The Hebrew Bible: Andersen-Forbes Analyzed Text
  • The Hebrew Bible: Andersen-Forbes Analyzed Phrase Marker Analysis
  • A Systematic Glossary to the Andersen-Forbes Analysis of the Hebrew Bible

These resources are included in the Original Languages Library and higher (Scholar’s, Silver, and Gold). If you don’t have one of these base packages, visit http://www.logos.com/upgrade to see your upgrade options.

If you’re interested in learning how to put these resources to good use, let Mike show you how in these five videos.

For more Andersen-Forbes videos, see the Syntax section on our Videos page.

Deleting Duplicate Resources

Hard drive prices continue to plummet. I was surprised to notice a couple of days ago that you can now get a 500 GB Seagate Barracuda 7200.10 desktop hard drive for under $75. The 7200.11 is only $5 more. When I checked a few months ago, they were $110 and $120 respectively.

If you’re like me, though, you still manage to find plenty of things to fill up your hard drive with and want to make sure that you don’t have unnecessary duplicate content taking up precious space.

Cleaning Up Your Libronix Library

It is likely that you have multiple copies of at least some of your resources on your hard drive. Here are three possible scenarios:

  • You have old LLS resources, downloaded the new Libronix ones, and never deleted the old ones.
  • You have more than one resources folder, and the same resources have accidentally ended up in more than one of them.
  • You manually copied resources to your resources folder and had Windows keep both instead of overwriting or skipping.

If you have the Power Tools Addin, you can easily remove these duplicate resources and free up some hard drive space. (If you don’t have it, you can install it by simply running Libronix Update and checking the appropriate box.)

Here are the steps to take for the best experience in removing your duplicate resources:

  1. Refresh Resources: Go to Tools > Options > General > Resource Paths and click “Refresh Resources.” Restart Libronix to start the refreshing process. You’ll see “Discovering Resources” in the bottom right-hand corner. It will disappear once the refreshing process is complete.
  2. Restart Libronix: Once Libronix is done refreshing resources, restart Libronix twice.
  3. Run the Remove Duplicate Resources Tool: Go to Tools > Library Management > Remove Duplicate Resources, and Libronix will begin scanning your resource paths for any duplicate resources files. You can leave it at “Unlocked on Local Drives” unless you keep locked resources on your computer.
  4. Delete the Duplicate Files: When it finishes building the list, you’ll see that at least one box is checked for each duplicate resource. (You shouldn’t need to check any boxes. Libronix will automatically check the boxes for the files that can safely been deleted.) Libronix will keep the newest resource and delete all others. Scan through the list to see what files will be deleted, and then click “Delete Files.”

That’s it. Enjoy that extra space! :)

Adding RefTagger to a Drupal Site

LogoDrupal is popular open source Content Management System (CMS) software. Many churches and ministries use it.

A few days ago I got a request from an individual who wants to add RefTagger to his Drupal site but isn’t sure how to get it set up, so I thought I’d provide a quick tutorial.

Unfortunately, Drupal doesn’t allow you to edit the code of your themes from the admin panel, at least not that I can see. But if you have access to your site’s files via FTP, you can add RefTagger very easily.

Here are the simple steps you need to follow:

  1. Use an FTP program to navigate to the folder where you installed Drupal.
  2. Open the “themes” subfolder, and then open the folder for the specific theme you are using. (The default theme is Minneli, which is a subtheme of Garland, so you’ll find the file in the “garland” folder.)
  3. Locate the page.tpl.php file, and save a local copy (and a backup copy too).
  4. Open the file in Dreamweaver, WordPad, or your favorite code editor.
  5. Scroll to the bottom and paste the customizable RefTagger code before the </body> tag.
  6. Save the file and upload it back to your server.

That’s it. RefTagger is now transforming the content of your Drupal site!

If you’re using RefTagger on your Drupal site, please let us know. We’d love to see how you are putting it to use.

For help with other sites, see the tutorials section on the RefTagger page.

Adding RefTagger to a Simple Machines Forum Site

LogoOver the last couple of months, several people have asked me if it is possible to add RefTagger to a forum site. I’ve set it up on a couple of different test installs, and it works very nicely. Forums are perfect places for RefTagger. If you run a forum site that deals with the Bible—or have plans to start one—I’d encourage you to give RefTagger a try. If you frequent a Christian forum site that has plain old naked Scripture references, why not send the administrators an emails and ask them to look into adding RefTagger?

There are a variety of different forum programs. vBulletin is probably the most popular, but since it’s not free, many use Simple Machines Forum (SMF) or phpBB.

Here’s a quick tutorial for adding RefTagger to your SMF site.

You simply need to add the RefTagger code immediately before the closing </body> tag in the index.template.php file in all of your active themes. (There are three installed by default.) You’ll find the </body> tag in the fourth section of code.

Here are the steps:

  1. Go to your Admin Center (http://yoursitename.com/index.php?action=admin).
  2. In the left sidebar, click on “Themes and Layout” under “Configuration.”
  3. Click “Modify Themes.”
  4. Select a theme, and click “Browse the templates and files in this theme.”
  5. Click on “index.template.php.”
  6. Navigate to the bottom of the fourth section of code and find the </body> tag (or just use Ctrl + F to find it).
  7. Paste in the RefTagger code immediately above the </body> tag.
  8. Scroll to the bottom of the page, and click “Save Changes.”
  9. Repeat steps 3-8 to add the code to your other theme.

I don’t see how to edit the default theme “SMF Default Theme – Core.” There’s probably a way to do it in the Admin Center, but I don’t see how. There are a couple of workarounds. You can switch your default theme to something else and uncheck the box “Allow members to select the ‘Default’ them.” If you like the default theme, you can always Create a copy of it and set the copy as your default.

If you have FTP access to your site’s files, it is fairly easily to add the RefTagger code manually. Just navigate to the Themes/default folder, locate the index.template.php file, and save a local copy (and a backup copy, too, just to be safe). Open the file with Dreamweaver or WordPad (or whatever program you like to use to edit code), locate the </body> tag, and paste in the RefTagger code. Save the file. Upload it to your server, overwriting the original file. You’re all set. RefTagger should now be up and running on your SMF site.

Changing the Font and Font Size in Notes

A couple of people have inquired recently if there is a way to change the font in their notes. One user asked,

Is there a way to set the default font & font size for Note Files? The default font of 10pt Arial is a tad too small for my eyes, especially when keying in Greek/Hebrew, so I was just curious to know if this is possible.

Thanks!

The quick solution to the size issue may simply be to change the zoom. You can adjust the zoom on notes just like you can with resources and reports. Go to View > Zoom and select the size you’d like.

Here’s a note file with the default font, size, and zoom.

Here’s a note file with the zoom set at 200%.

This nice thing about using the zoom is that it does apply to all of the notes in a note file, so you don’t have to change them one by one. But notice that this also enlarges the buttons (and scroll bar, if applicable), which you may or may not like.

In the current version, there’s no way to globally change the default font size or font face of all note text. But you can easily adjust the font formatting for individual notes by clicking the A button on the toolbar (or by using Ctrl + Shift + F).

Here’s the same note file with 14pt Calibri, which is a little easier on the eyes than the 10pt Arial.

Update: Thanks to a couple of user comments, I have updated the post—with a red face—to reflect the easy way to change the font and font size. :)

Opening Multiple Copies of the Same Resource

Have you ever wondered how to open the same resource in two or more separate windows? This question comes up regularly in the newsgroups and in comments on the blog. Rick addressed this about three years ago, but it’s probably about time to cover it again.

Opening multiple copies of the same resource comes in handy if you want to compare one Bible passage side by side with another passage in the same version. It’s also useful if you want to look up cross references without leaving the passage you’re in. (Make sure to click the “Reference Target” button on the second copy.)

As far as I know, there are four different ways to open an additional copy of a resource.

  1. Window > New Window: With the resource you want to duplicate opened and selected, go under the Window menu and click “New Window.”
  2. Ctrl + Shift + N: Keyboard shortcut lovers will want to use Ctrl + Shift + N instead.
  3. Shift + Left Mouse Click: Hold down Shift when you click on a link to a resource or when you click on a title in My Library. Ctrl also works for links in resources, but not in My Library. (Ctrl and Shift clicking also works in web browsers. Give it a try if you’re not familiar with it.)
  4. Go Box: By default the Go box (a.k.a. Quick Navigation Bar) will open a new instance of a resource. So if you already have one copy opened, simply type the resource identifier (e.g., ESV) into the Go box and hit Enter to open a second copy.