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Adding RefTagger to a Drupal Site

LogoDrupal is popular open source Content Management System (CMS) software. Many churches and ministries use it.

A few days ago I got a request from an individual who wants to add RefTagger to his Drupal site but isn’t sure how to get it set up, so I thought I’d provide a quick tutorial.

Unfortunately, Drupal doesn’t allow you to edit the code of your themes from the admin panel, at least not that I can see. But if you have access to your site’s files via FTP, you can add RefTagger very easily.

Here are the simple steps you need to follow:

  1. Use an FTP program to navigate to the folder where you installed Drupal.
  2. Open the “themes” subfolder, and then open the folder for the specific theme you are using. (The default theme is Minneli, which is a subtheme of Garland, so you’ll find the file in the “garland” folder.)
  3. Locate the page.tpl.php file, and save a local copy (and a backup copy too).
  4. Open the file in Dreamweaver, WordPad, or your favorite code editor.
  5. Scroll to the bottom and paste the customizable RefTagger code before the </body> tag.
  6. Save the file and upload it back to your server.

That’s it. RefTagger is now transforming the content of your Drupal site!

If you’re using RefTagger on your Drupal site, please let us know. We’d love to see how you are putting it to use.

For help with other sites, see the tutorials section on the RefTagger page.

Adding RefTagger to a Simple Machines Forum Site

LogoOver the last couple of months, several people have asked me if it is possible to add RefTagger to a forum site. I’ve set it up on a couple of different test installs, and it works very nicely. Forums are perfect places for RefTagger. If you run a forum site that deals with the Bible—or have plans to start one—I’d encourage you to give RefTagger a try. If you frequent a Christian forum site that has plain old naked Scripture references, why not send the administrators an emails and ask them to look into adding RefTagger?

There are a variety of different forum programs. vBulletin is probably the most popular, but since it’s not free, many use Simple Machines Forum (SMF) or phpBB.

Here’s a quick tutorial for adding RefTagger to your SMF site.

You simply need to add the RefTagger code immediately before the closing </body> tag in the index.template.php file in all of your active themes. (There are three installed by default.) You’ll find the </body> tag in the fourth section of code.

Here are the steps:

  1. Go to your Admin Center (http://yoursitename.com/index.php?action=admin).
  2. In the left sidebar, click on “Themes and Layout” under “Configuration.”
  3. Click “Modify Themes.”
  4. Select a theme, and click “Browse the templates and files in this theme.”
  5. Click on “index.template.php.”
  6. Navigate to the bottom of the fourth section of code and find the </body> tag (or just use Ctrl + F to find it).
  7. Paste in the RefTagger code immediately above the </body> tag.
  8. Scroll to the bottom of the page, and click “Save Changes.”
  9. Repeat steps 3-8 to add the code to your other theme.

I don’t see how to edit the default theme “SMF Default Theme – Core.” There’s probably a way to do it in the Admin Center, but I don’t see how. There are a couple of workarounds. You can switch your default theme to something else and uncheck the box “Allow members to select the ‘Default’ them.” If you like the default theme, you can always Create a copy of it and set the copy as your default.

If you have FTP access to your site’s files, it is fairly easily to add the RefTagger code manually. Just navigate to the Themes/default folder, locate the index.template.php file, and save a local copy (and a backup copy, too, just to be safe). Open the file with Dreamweaver or WordPad (or whatever program you like to use to edit code), locate the </body> tag, and paste in the RefTagger code. Save the file. Upload it to your server, overwriting the original file. You’re all set. RefTagger should now be up and running on your SMF site.

Changing the Font and Font Size in Notes

A couple of people have inquired recently if there is a way to change the font in their notes. One user asked,

Is there a way to set the default font & font size for Note Files? The default font of 10pt Arial is a tad too small for my eyes, especially when keying in Greek/Hebrew, so I was just curious to know if this is possible.

Thanks!

The quick solution to the size issue may simply be to change the zoom. You can adjust the zoom on notes just like you can with resources and reports. Go to View > Zoom and select the size you’d like.

Here’s a note file with the default font, size, and zoom.

Here’s a note file with the zoom set at 200%.

This nice thing about using the zoom is that it does apply to all of the notes in a note file, so you don’t have to change them one by one. But notice that this also enlarges the buttons (and scroll bar, if applicable), which you may or may not like.

In the current version, there’s no way to globally change the default font size or font face of all note text. But you can easily adjust the font formatting for individual notes by clicking the A button on the toolbar (or by using Ctrl + Shift + F).

Here’s the same note file with 14pt Calibri, which is a little easier on the eyes than the 10pt Arial.

Update: Thanks to a couple of user comments, I have updated the post—with a red face—to reflect the easy way to change the font and font size. :)

Opening Multiple Copies of the Same Resource

Have you ever wondered how to open the same resource in two or more separate windows? This question comes up regularly in the newsgroups and in comments on the blog. Rick addressed this about three years ago, but it’s probably about time to cover it again.

Opening multiple copies of the same resource comes in handy if you want to compare one Bible passage side by side with another passage in the same version. It’s also useful if you want to look up cross references without leaving the passage you’re in. (Make sure to click the “Reference Target” button on the second copy.)

As far as I know, there are four different ways to open an additional copy of a resource.

  1. Window > New Window: With the resource you want to duplicate opened and selected, go under the Window menu and click “New Window.”
  2. Ctrl + Shift + N: Keyboard shortcut lovers will want to use Ctrl + Shift + N instead.
  3. Shift + Left Mouse Click: Hold down Shift when you click on a link to a resource or when you click on a title in My Library. Ctrl also works for links in resources, but not in My Library. (Ctrl and Shift clicking also works in web browsers. Give it a try if you’re not familiar with it.)
  4. Go Box: By default the Go box (a.k.a. Quick Navigation Bar) will open a new instance of a resource. So if you already have one copy opened, simply type the resource identifier (e.g., ESV) into the Go box and hit Enter to open a second copy.

“Be kind to your older folks.”

Last week I got an email with the subject line “Be kind to your older folks.” Good advice, and biblical too (1 Tim 5:1-2; cf. v. 8). Here’s what she had to say:

Would you please be kind to us older folks whose eyes are not as sharp as they used to be? You young programmers love 10 pt. fonts for some reason which I have never understood. Are you conserving space or something? Please make it possible for us older folks to enlarge the font size of static webpage text, especially things like our personal prayer lists. I get eye strain every day just trying to read my own prayer list, and it discourages me from using Logos for that purpose.

Thank you for your consideration and bless you for all the work you do for us.

I understand how frustrating it can be when software doesn’t function the way you think it should. There’s a particular feature in Microsoft Office that drives me crazy every time I use it.

We want to hear from you regarding things you’d like to be able to do and things you wish were different. We can’t always implement them, and often we can’t implement them immediately (though occasionally we can), but we do want to hear them. You can use suggest@logos.com or our suggestion newsgroup to let your voice be heard. We’re listening.

What often happens, though, is that suggestions provide an opportunity to demonstrates features already in the software. Such is the case with this request, at least for the most part. It is possible to change the font size for prayer lists to make them more readable.

Here’s how:

  1. Open your prayer list by going to File > Open and selecting “Prayer Lists” and the particular prayer list you’d like to open.
  2. With the prayer list opened and selected, go to View > Zoom and select something like 150%, or larger if you’d like.

Your prayer list will go from this:

to this:

or even bigger.

If you’d like to make this change globally so that it applies to all of your resources, reports, and other documents, go to Tools > Options > General > Text Display and set your default zoom to whatever size you’d like. Make sure to uncheck the box “Use Default Zoom Only with Resources” if you’d like it to apply to things like your prayer lists.

The zoom allows you to make the font size as big as you’d like in order to make your reading—and praying—more comfortable.

Adding RefTagger to a Blogger Blog

A few days ago someone asked if we would make it possible to use RefTagger on a Blogger blog. I was happy to let him know that RefTagger works very well with Blogger, and I explained to him two ways to get it up and running on his blog in just a couple of minutes.

It occurred to me that not everyone who has a blog is used to messing with code and editing template files, so I thought I’d do a brief tutorial here on the blog.

If you use Google’s Blogger and would like to add RefTagger to your site, here are two methods for setting it up.

Method 1: Adding a Page Element

Perhaps the simplest way for beginners to get RefTagger up and running is to add a page element. From your Blogger dashboard, click “Layout.” You’ll be taken by default to the “Page Elements” tab. Click “Add a Page Element” at the bottom of the page (not the one in the sidebar), and choose “HTML/JavaScript.” Leave the title blank, and paste in the customizable code that you get from the RefTagger page. Then click “Save.” Blogger should add the new page element to the bottom of your layout page automatically. If it appears in your sidebar, simply drag it to the very bottom of the footer. If you make any changes, make sure to save it before leaving the page.

When you’re done, your page should look something like this:

Method 2: Modifying Your Template File

The alternate method is to manually add the code before the closing body tag in your template file. From your Blogger dashboard, click “Layout.” Then click “Edit HTML.” Scroll all the way to the bottom of the code and paste in the customizable code that you get from the RefTagger page right before the closing body tag (i.e., right before </body>). Then click “Save Template.”

That’s it. RefTagger should now be up and running on your Blogger blog.

If you have any trouble or would like to see a tutorial for another blogging platform, leave a comment on this post or send an email to reftagger@logos.com.

Ibid., Footnotes, and the Auto-Lookup Feature

A comment on a recent blog post asked,

Concerning footnote text, when I am in a resource and move my cursor over a footnote, if it is a previously cited work, then the text shows up as "ibid." Is there any way to list the footnotes, so that I don’t have to go through the text to find the author of the citation?

Yes, in fact, there is a way to show all of the footnotes in a list. The Auto-Lookup feature should do the trick.

Sometimes you can just look at the previous footnote to find the source you’re looking for, but many times the previous footnote is a couple of pages earlier, and often you have to trace a trail of ibids before you finally find what it’s pointing to.

If you click a footnote only to see the infamous Ibid., there is an easier way to find the source behind it than looking at the previous footnotes. Simply right click anywhere on the page and select “Auto-Lookup.” The Auto-Lookup report will instantly show you a list of the text from the surrounding pop-ups like footnotes and Bible references.

So next time you run into ibids, look no further than the Auto-Lookup feature.

Linking Between Note Files and Other Documents

A question I get occasionally is how to link from note files to Word docs, PDFs, etc. Here’s a recent email from a friend:

My dad uses Logos in his personal Bible study, and he keeps his notes in the Logos notes files. He recently asked me if it was possible to link from Logos notes to Word or Excel files (and vice versa). Based on my playing around, I don’t see that capability, but though I’d shoot you an e-mail just in case you knew differently.

Since its not obvious how to do this, I thought I’d give a quick tutorial.

But before we get there, allow me to mention briefly how to link to Bibles and other resources in Libronix from your notes.

Linking to Bible Verses

Creating links to Bible verses in Logos note files is simple. Just type or paste in one or more Bible references and click the “Tag References As Hyperlinks” button (highlighted in the below image). Logos will automatically link them. Single clicking on any reference will open the passage in your default Bible.

Linking to Other Libronix Resources

You can easily create links to other Libronix resources as well. Type some text like “See the article in the NDT on Eschatology.” Open the resource to the location you’d like to link to. Next, select the portion of text that you’d like to be the hyperlink, and click the “Insert Reference” button (highlighted in the below image). Choose the appropriate location from the drop-down box, and check the box “Specific to this resource” if you’d like the link to open to the article on eschatology in the NDT rather than some other dictionary or encyclopedia. Finally, click “Insert.” You’re all set.

Linking to External Documents or Web Pages

There are two ways to link to external documents or web pages from a note file.

Option 1: Paste in the Location

The first way is to paste the file location or web address directly into the note file. Libronix will automatically turn it into a hyperlink. Clicking on the link will launch the page or file in your web browser.

Pasting in web addresses if straightforward. An example would be http://www.ccel.org/ccel/anselm/devotions.iii.iii.i.html. Pasting in the location to a local file may be less familiar to many of you. There are two things you need to remember: (1) you have to add the file protocol (i.e., file:///) in front of the location, and (2) you have to replace spaces with their HTML equivalent %20.

So if your file is located here: C:\Documents and Settings\pgons\My Documents\Sermons\Romans 8.28.pdf. You would want to past in file:///C:/Documents%20and%20Settings/pgons/My%20Documents/Sermons/Romans%208.28.pdf. (You’ll notice that I changed the backwards slashes into forward slashes, but Libronix will recognize either way.)

Option 2: Create the Links in Word or Another Program

If you don’t want to have long, messy-looking links showing in your note files (like you see in the above image) and don’t want to remember how to create a link to a local file, this option might be the better solution for you. Simply create your note file in Word or a similar program (or paste it there from your note file), add your links to web pages and/or local files, and then paste your text back into your note file. While this does require an extra step or two, it allows you to hide your links behind text and more simply link to your local files.

Linking to Note Files

You can also link to Logos note files from Word docs, PDFs, and even from other note files. With your note file opened to the location you’d like to link to and the window selected, simply click “Copy Location to Clipboard.” You’ll find this under the “Favorites” menu. (You can also use the shortcut Alt+Ctrl+C.)

Then simply paste that link into Word or another program to create the hyperlink. Follow the steps in Option 2 above to link from one note file to another.

To learn more about linking and your Libronix library, see External Linking to Libronix Resources and Reports.

Understanding Data Types: Reference Data Types

Well, it’s about time to bring this series on data types to a close. It’s been a while since we talked about data types, so you might want to review by looking at some of the previous posts.

In this final post, we are going to look at reference data types and what they mean for more advanced studying and searching.

What Is a Reference Data Type?

To review, a reference data type is a scheme for referring to a location or range in a book (e.g., the Westminster Confession of Faith) or series of books (e.g., Barth’s Church Dogmatics).

The most common reference data type is the Bible (e.g, John 3:16). Others include Josephus (e.g, Antiquities 16.253), Philo (e.g., Hypothetica 11.18), the Apostolic Fathers (e.g., Ign Eph 2.2), Calvin’s Institutes of the Christian Religion (e.g., IV, xvi, 3), the Book of Concord (e.g., Formula of Concord: Epitome, art. viii, par. 39), the Westminster Confession of Faith (e.g., Chapter XIX, 6), BDF (e.g., BDF §272), Louw and Nida (e.g., LN 58.73), the Theological Wordbook of the Old Testament (e.g., no. 1768b), the Context of Scripture (e.g., COS 1.56), and Barth’s Kirchliche Dogmatic (e.g., KD I.1 p.352).

Since these and many other resources are data types, you (1) have greater control over what resources open when executing keylinks and (2) can perform very advanced searches in other books in your digital library that cite a particular data type.

Setting Up Keylink Targets for Reference Data Types

For each of these reference data types there may be more than one suitable keylink destination. For example, if you own the Apostolic Fathers in Greek and English (3 Editions, with Morphology), you can tell Libronix which version of the Apostolic Fathers to use when executing an Apostolic Fathers keylink (i.e., when looking up a reference in the Apostolic Fathers). You can even specify whether you’d like to see Greek or English by default.

To set up your preferred resources for various reference data types, go to Tools > Options > Keylink and select the appropriate data type from the drop-down menu.

Promote and prioritize the resources however you’d like.

Searching for Reference Data Types

There are several ways that you can perform advanced searches for reference data types.

1. Use the Right-Click Menu.

One way to search for a specific data type reference in another resource is to start in the resource that contains the reference that you want to search for and use the right-click menu. For example, if I’m at Calvin’s “Exposition of the Moral Law” in Book Two of his Institutes (i.e., II, viii), I can right click anywhere in that article and select “Search for References to II, viii.”

This will launch a library-wide search for other books in your library that cite this reference in Calvin’s Institutes. If you have a lot of books or know you want to search only a limited range of your resources, this is probably not the best way to do a search like this. What it does do for you, though, is provide you with the syntax for that search, which you can then use in a basic search. The syntax for this particular search is "cicr" in "II, viii".

2. Use the Basic Search.

To search a particular book or collection for a data type reference or range of references, you can use the basic search. The syntax is "data type" in "data type reference" (e.g., "Bible" in "John 3:16"). By using “in” your search will turn up ranges that include your reference. If you want to find the exact reference, use "data type" = "data type reference" (e.g., "Bible" = "John 3:16").

If you want to find all the places where a book or collection cites another resource, simple use the entire range of references in your search. Here are some examples:

  • "KD" in "Die Kirchliche Dogmatik I-IV"
  • "confess" in "The Confessions of St. Augustine, Book 1-13"
  • "cicr" in "I-IV"
  • "bible" in "Gen-Rev"

A search like "cicr" in "I-IV" in the Works of Van Til would allow you to use Van Til as a commentary of sorts on Calvin’s Institutes.

3. Use the Reference Browser.

If you don’t want to mess with hard-to-remember syntax, the Reference Browser makes performing searches like this even easier. Select (1) the book or collection you’d like to search, (2) the data type, (3) the reference or range to search for, and (4) whether to find the reference exactly or broader ranges that include that reference. If you are new to reference data type searching, the Reference Browser is definitely the best place to start.

Sometimes it can be difficult to know exactly what to enter into the Find box. Using the right-click menu as mentioned above or simply displaying the data type in the Active Index for the resource well help you figure this out.

4. Use the Passage Guide.

Finally, you can also use the Passage Guide to search one or more collections for Bible references. In the Passage Guide, select Properties and check the boxes next to any collections that you would like to have included in your Passage Guide search.

For more on searching for data types, see the article Exploring Logos Searching.

Other posts in this series:

Searching As a Kind of Visual Filter

The visual filters in Logos are very helpful. If you haven’t used them much, take a couple of minutes to check them out by going to View > Visual Filters. Notice that you can select to see the visual filters available for All Resources or a particular resource chosen from the drop-down box.

My favorite visual filters are the Morphology Filter (cf. here and here) and the Active Bible Reference (cf. here). Other filters include Page Numbers and Bible Reading Plans. The Andersen-Forbes Analyzed Text of the Hebrew Bible has special genre and source visual filters that are pretty cool.

The morphology filter allows you to markup certain words based on criteria that you define. For example, in the Greek NT you can mark up all indicative verbs or plural nouns. It works the same way in the Hebrew OT. You can create as many of these filters as you’d like, save them, and toggle them off and on as appropriate.

One of the benefits of the morphology filter is that it calls your attention to certain words as you work your way through the text. This is great for resources that contain morphological tagging, but what if you want certain English words to stand out as you read or skim through a portion of Scripture, a chapter in a book, or a journal article? While you can use the morphology filter to mark up up English words in the reverse interlinears, there isn’t a visual filter for marking up certain words or phrases in your average English books. You could do this manually with the visual markup tools, but this might not always be the most efficient way to accomplish what you want.

What I like to do when I want my eyes to catch certain words as I work through a text is to use searching as a sort of visual filter.

Let’s say I’m studying the doctrine of the Trinity and working through portions of Gunton’s The Promise of Trinitarian Theology. I want to note especially where Gunton mentions language of subordination. I’m not so much just looking for all the occurrences of the term as I am reading a chapter and wanting certain terms to stand out. So I run a search on subordin* and get an instant visual filter applied as I work through the text.

If I want several terms to stand out, I would simply run multiple searches or add all the search terms in the same search (e.g., subordin* OR trinit*). Logos conveniently highlights each search term with a different color.

Perhaps you’ll find this helpful in your own reading and research.