Logos 4: Read Your Own Highlights

mp|seminars Tips

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos training seminars.

Normally when I read a print book, I read with a highlighter in handto mark those things I deem important. After finishing the book, I skim back through it, reading only the highlights to reinforce them in my mind. Did you realize you can do the same thing with Logos Bible Software 4? Here’s how:

  • Open and read a Logos book
  • From the Tools menu use the Highlighting feature to mark up the resource

Now read back through just the highlights:

  • Choose the resources Panel menu
  • Select Show locator bar (keboard shortcut: Ctrl+Shift+L)
  • Click the small triangle next to the word Article on the right side of the Locator bar
  • From the drop down list select Highlight

Now use the Up (Previous) and Down (Next) arrows on the right side of the Locator bar to jump to the Previous or Next highlight! It’s like reading your own CliffsNotes!

Logos 4: Display Bible Text in List Form

mp|seminars Tips

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos training seminars.

You’ve probably noticed that most Bibles are printed in paragraph form. This is great for reading, but when you’re studying the Bible verse-by-verse, those little verse numbers are sometimes hard to find. No worries. Logos allows us to display a Bible in list form with each verse starting on a separate line.

  • Open a Bible to a desired location
  • Click the Visual Filters icon (three circles) on the Bible’s toolbar
  • Select Bible Text Only

Instantly the Bible transitions to list form! This makes verse by verse study much easier.

Please take note, though, that in Bible Text Only mode, the cross references also disappear. In Bible Text Only mode, the emphasis is on verses only!

Logos 4: Project Logos on the Big Screen

mp|seminars Tips

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos training seminars.

As an owner of Logos Bible Software 4, I’m sure you’re continuing to improve your mastery of this incredible tool for your personal Bible study. I hope also, if you’re a teacher or pastor, that you find ways to utilize the program in public teaching situations. With a laptop and projector you can utilize your electronic library right in the classroom. Here’s a little trick to help your students better see Logos when it’s projected:

  • Choose Tools | Program Settings
  • Under Accessibility increase the percentage of Program Scaling

Now everything in the program including icons, menus, guides, tools, and more, are enlarged for easier viewing. Your students will thank you for this little tweak in the program. This tip also comes in handy for those late nights of study when your eyes are tired!

Video Tutorial: Biblical Places – Dynamic Maps

Video Tutorial

One phenomenal feature of Biblical Places is the capturing of actual geographic coordinates for as many biblical locations as possible. As you place your mouse over different areas of the maps in Biblical Places, you can actually see the exact longitude and latitude in the upper right hand corner. A simple click on the provided link and you can see those coordinates as they exist now in Google Maps!

Another great feature in Biblical Places is the ability to measure distances by pressing Ctrl and left clicking/dragging from one place on the map to another.

Biblical Places really opens up the geography of the biblical world to you. No longer is your biblical atlas a tool that you interact with passively, but it is powerful tool that you can manipulate and control to grasp the significance geography plays in biblical events.

Logos 4: Locate Occurrences of an Original Word or Strong’s Number

mp|seminars Tips

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos training seminars.

I have received numerous e-mails asking, “Where is the Englishman’s Concordance in Logos 4?” Just to be sure you know what I’m referring to, the Englishman’s Concordance was a special search feature in Libronix 3 that located every occurrence of a Strong’s number (which represented a Hebrew or Greek word) in the Bible.

So if you have been wondering this yourself, here is the answer: the name Englishman’s Concordance does not appear in Logos 4, but the functionality does:

  • Open a Bible with the reverse interlinear option (currently ESV, NRSV, KJV, NKJKV, NASB, and NLT)
  • Right click on a word in a verse
  • From the right menu, select Lemma “your word” OR Strong’s “your number”
  • Select Search this resource

There before your eyes will be every occurrence of that word or number! When doing word studies, this is a valuable search so that you can compare Scripture with Scripture.

Logos 4: Open Just the Bible for A Reading Plan

mp|seminars Tips

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos training seminars.

In the ribbon of the Home Page you can create your own personalized Bible Reading Plan. Create a plan for Through the Bible in a Year, Through the Old Testament in 6 Months, Through Paul’s Letters in a Month on Mondays and Fridays, or whatever you desire.

Then in the same ribbon you’ll be hyperlinked to the day’s Bible reading. You may have noticed, however, when you click the link to the Bible passage you not only open the Bible, but also some Bible study tools. If you just want to open the Bible without the study aids here’s all you do:

  • Right click on the link to the Bible passage
  • From the right menu select Link “your Bible”
  • Select Open link

Now just your Bible opens to the day’s reading!

Digging for Commentary the New-Fashioned Way

How it used to be done

When I first began my seminary training in 1992, things were a little different. Doing research meant going to the library and digging through a literal card catalog (yeah, the kind with 3 x 5 cards). I learned about the “usual places” to look for exegetical help: commentaries, journals, Bible dictionaries and encyclopedias and so on. For instance, I wanted to find some discussion about why Jethro is called “Moses’ father-in-law” so many times in Exodus 18 (18x compared to “Jethro” 7x). You see, I had an inquiring mind, but the kinds of questions I came up with were not often discussed in “the usual places.” So now what?

About that time, Sheffield Academic Press began producing a host of wonderful resources–both Old and New Testament–that provided focused discussion of specific passages, themes or issues in a book, ones that did not really fit in with the normal template of a commentary. They also published collections of essays that were thematically related, sometimes focused on a single book of the Bible, other times tracking one theme through a whole testament. There was “gold in them thar hills” as the saying goes, but boy, was it ever some mighty hard digging to find it. It took a lot of work to find a nugget, but wow, was it ever worth it when you found what you were looking for!

At about the same time I began to realize that commentaries are selective. Although commentators are expected to cover certain topics for each passage, sometimes writers will stop and rant about something they are passionate about, oftentimes relegated to a footnote. But these “extended dance versions” comments are hit and miss. They may not even be about the book they are commenting on, but on some other book that is quoted or alluded to! Oh how the times have changed; the search resources available today are astounding in comparison.

The tide turns . . .

So how have things changed? Well to begin with, having an electronic version of the resource opens the door for full-text searches, which is a great thing. But Logos resources go about four or five steps further down the road than your average search engine like Google Books. Every book or resource has been painstakingly analyzed by our Electronic Text Development department. This means that no matter how obscure an abbreviation scheme is used for biblical book (e.g. Ezekiel, Ezek, Ez), no matter what punctuation scheme (e.g. 1:1, 1.1, 11), you’re going to find it, thanks to the festive folks in ETD . Try that using a Kindle or with Google books!

But wait, there’s more! Logos 4 has streamlined the search process by allowing rule-based collections to be built. Collections allow you to do more focused searches or reports. I have all of my commentaries in one collection, all of my grammars in another. Why not separate them by Old/New Testament or by Greek/Hebrew? Because of the rants I mentioned above. Some great nuggets about Acts 2 can be found in commentaries on Joel because of Peter’s quotation in Acts 2:17-21, for example.

Getting the most out of your resources

But it gets even better! Remember the Sheffield resources I mentioned earlier, the ones that have great discussions about passages, but that were terribly hard to find (and that cost you two children and a small aardvark to purchase!)? Adding collections of JSOT, JSNT, or Sheffield Readers into your commentary collections will significantly expand the volume of extended discussions about key passages. The same is true of journal collections like:

There are a number of great Old Testament collections from Sheffield that are currently on Pre-Pub:

If your current focus is the New Testament, there are plenty of great collections available as well:

There is no better platform for “mining” resources like these than Logos 4, period. Whether you are looking for technical discussions for research papers, or for homiletical or devotional material for teaching, you will only find what you have. If you are looking for new resources that will expand your exegetical pool for searching, then take a serious look at these collections. There are great nuggets in them thar hills, and no better tool for finding them than Logos 4!

Logos 4: Phrase Searching

mp|seminars Tips

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos training seminars.

Years ago I owned a print book called The Phrase Concordance of the Bible which contained the locations of numerous phrases in the Bible. I really liked this book, but quite often was frustrated with it. Inevitably the phrase I wanted to lookup was not in the book. Obviously there’s no practical way to make an exhaustive concordance of every phrase in the Bible. Logos 4 allows us, however, to locate any phrase in any Bible, regardless of how obscure the phrase may be. Here’s one way to access your exhaustive phrase concordance:

  • Open any Bible to any passage
  • Select (highlight) any phrase
  • Right click on the selection
  • Update: From the right side of the pop-up menu click Selection your phrase
    • Example: Selection praise the Lord.
    • Reference, Greek Strong’s or another item may already be selected so be sure to click Selection.
  • Update: Then, from the left side of the menu click Search this resource

Your results appear almost instantly!

Please note this potential problem: If you select a phrase containing a footnote, the search will yield no hits.

Here’s one way to avoid the problem:

  • On the Bible click the Visual filters icon (three circles icon)
  • Select Bible text only

Now the Bible is displayed in list form with no footnotes or cross references. Phrase searching is now much easier.

Enjoy locating praise the Lord, and grace to you, and will of God, and

Zerwick’s Grammatical Analysis of the Greek New Testament

Many who use A Grammatical Analysis of the Greek New Testament in print affectionately refer to it as “Max & Mary” after the author and translator/reviser, Max Zerwick and Mary Grosvenor. The affection is for good reason, “Max & Mary” offer a helpful and informed analysis of the grammar of the Greek New Testament. And they do it in a commentary format, so the Logos Bible Software version (which you already have if you have the Portfolio LE edition of Logos) scrolls synchronously with your text — English (reverse interlinear? yes!), Greek, or whatever other New Testament edition you have.
I’ll be honest: I haven’t used this book much; it seems I have so many other tools available! But I’ve learned that I’m the one who has been missing out. Why? First, some minor points:

  1. There is a great little “Glossary of Grammatical Terms” included in the front matter.
  2. There are links throughout, by section number, to Zerwick’s Biblical Greek, Illustrated by Examples (included in the Introduction to Biblical Greek Collection)

I’ll use 1Ti 2.3-7 as an example of the kind of stuff that “Max & Mary” offer, listing the Greek text (NA27) with the Lexham English Bible translation interspersed. I’ve also highlighted in bold all of the terms that are mentioned. The analysis will follow for each verse, broken out with one item per line.

3 τοῦτο καλὸν καὶ ἀπόδεκτον ἐνώπιον τοῦ σωτῆρος ἡμῶν θεοῦ,
3 This is good and acceptable before God our Savior,

3 ἀπόδεκτος (< ἀποδέχομαι welcome) welcome, pleasing.
σωτήρ 1:1

4 ὃς πάντας ἀνθρώπους θέλει σωθῆναι καὶ εἰς ἐπίγνωσιν ἀληθείας ἐλθεῖν.
4 who wants all people to be saved and to come to a knowledge of the truth.

4 σωθῆναι aor. inf. pass. σῴζω.
ἐπί-γνωσις knowledge.
ἐλθεῖν aor2 inf. ἔρχομαι.

5 Εἷς γὰρ θεός, εἷς καὶ μεσίτης θεοῦ καὶ ἀνθρώπων, ἄνθρωπος Χριστὸς Ἰησοῦς,
5 For there is one God and one mediator between God and human beings, the man Christ Jesus,

5 εἷς…θεός there is one God.
μεσίτης mediator.

6 δοὺς ἑαυτὸν ἀντίλυτρον ὑπὲρ πάντων, τὸ μαρτύριον καιροῖς ἰδίοις.
6 who gave himself a ransom for all, the testimony at the proper time,

6 δούς aor2 ptc δίδωμι.
ἀντί-λυτρον ransom.
μαρτύριον evidence, testimony, i.e. to what has just been stated (v.4).
καιροῖς ἰδίοις at the proper time (time ordained by God).

7 εἰς ὃ ἐτέθην ἐγὼ κῆρυξ καὶ ἀπόστολος, ἀλήθειαν λέγω οὐ ψεύδομαι, διδάσκαλος ἐθνῶν ἐν πίστει καὶ ἀληθείᾳ.
7 for which I was appointed a herald and an apostle—I am speaking the truth, I am not lyinga teacher of the Gentiles in faith and truth.

7 εἰς ὅ to/for which.
ἐ-τέθην I was made, aor. pass. τίθημι appoint.
κῆρυξ -υκος ὁ herald, preacher.
ψεύδομαι lie, tell an untruth.
διδάσκαλος teacher.

Max Zerwick and Mary Grosvenor, A Grammatical Analysis of the Greek New Testament (Rome: Biblical Institute Press, 1974-), 629.

The analysis is rather compact and brief, but it gives helpful information, including potentially difficult bits of parsing/declension and glosses. These can help when reading or when thinking through a passage. Also helpful is the separation of prefix (typically prepositional) and root; this can help one recognize a word that might otherwise be unfamiliar. Lastly, they give some help for irregular forms (e.g. κῆρυξ -υκος ὁ in v. 7).
Max & Mary don’t just do this for a book of the NT, or a particular author; they do it for the whole Greek New Testament. That means that anywhere you go in the New Testament—any passage you’re studying—you can get some help from Max & Mary.
While I am impressed with the helpful analysis, I think I’m most impressed by a few paragraphs in the preface (quoted below in their entirety) that discuss the reason the work exists, and the people it is intended to help:

But most important of all is the purpose to be served. It is hoped that this English revised edition in its turn will mean that the Greek text of the New Testament will not remain exclusively a tool on the desks of a decreasing number of specialists but will become a living power in the hands of theologians, of preachers of the Word, of directors of Bible discussion-circles, and finally in the hands of those who pray in private from the Word of God. This is the purpose to be served. May God bless everyone helping it.

The student who has little knowledge of Greek should bear in mind while using this book that it is by no means necessary to understand immediately everything explained in it. The principle of one thing at a time will serve him well. Many of the linguistic subtleties go beyond the needs of the beginner and are intended for the more advanced student, interested perhaps in the characteristics of Hellenistic Greek as contrasted with classical Greek.

A helpful feature of this work (and a justification of its size) is the fact that a student can begin using it at whatever point he likes, each chapter being self-sufficient and not presupposing explanations given in the previous chapters.

Max Zerwick and Mary Grosvenor, A Grammatical Analysis of the Greek New Testament (Rome: Biblical Institute Press, 1974-), iii–iv.

Logos 4: Search While Typing

mp|seminars Tips

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos training seminars.

If you were a Libronix 3 user before moving up to Logos 4 you may have enjoyed a feature called Bible Speed Speech which automatically listed occurrences of your word or phrase even as you were typing. The good news is that the feature is in Logos 4; the name has just been changed to Search (while typing) Here’s how to use it:

  • Open the Search panel
  • Select Bible as the search type
  • Above the Find box click the drop down list called Search
  • Select Search (while typing) from the list
  • Select your desired passage range and Bible(s) from the other drop down lists
  • Type a word or phrase in the Find box
  • Notice the results are automatically displayed without clicking the Search arrow

Enjoy this automatic and instant concordance for any Bible in your Library!