Archive - Training RSS Feed

Logos 4: Select the Language Books for the Guides

mp|seminars Tips

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos training seminars.

I recently received this question from a Logos user:

The Lemma section of the Bible Word Study guide and the Word by Word section of the Exegetical Guide provide links to dictionaries and lexicons for various words. To the right of some resources are brief definitions, but some books display no such definitions. Why is this and can I control this feature?

First, those brief definitions or glosses are coming from the glossary field that appears in many, but not all Logos language resources. So if no glossary field is present in the book, no gloss is displayed in the Guide.

While we can not control the glosses that may or may not appear in the guides, we can determine which and in what order the resources are listed:

  • Open the Library
  • Click Prioritize in the upper right corner of the Library
  • Type this text in the Find box of the Library: type:dictionary which displays all of your English, Hebrew and Greek dictionaries
  • Right click on a dictionary and select Prioritize this resource, which places the book in the Prefer these resources list on the right
  • Repeat this step for as many language dictionaries as you like
  • Once the dictionaries are in the list on the right you can reorder them by dragging and dropping

The Exegetical Guide and Bible Word Study will now use this list to display resources for the words you’re studying.

Syntax Searching for Everyone: Syntax Search Templates

This is the third in a series of three posts called “Syntax Searching for Everyone”. In this video, we’ll peek at Syntax Search Templates.
What is a Syntax Search Template? Well, if you watched the video on Query Forms from the previous post in this series, you already know what a Syntax Search Template is. The template is the query that underlies the Query Form, just opened up in the syntax search document editor. From here you can better understand how queries are put together and modify them for your own use.
The video shows you how.

[Note: The Syntax Search Template feature is only available to users who have the Andersen-Forbes Hebrew Syntactic Analysis, the OpenText.org Greek NT Syntactic Analysis, and the Cascadia Syntax Graphs of the New Testament. The Andersen-Forbes and OpenText.org databases are in the Logos 4 Original Languages (LE) package and above; Cascadia is in the Logos 4 Scholar's Silver (LE) package and above.]

For other posts in this series, see:

Logos 4: Create a Family Tree

mp|seminars Tips

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos training seminars.

If you’re like me, you can’t keep up with all of the “begetting” in the Bible. In other words, what are the names of all of Jacob’s sons? Well, here’s an easy way to access the family trees of people in the Bible:

  • Open a Bible to a verse with a person’s name in it
  • Right click on the person’s name
  • From the right menu select Person the name (in our example, Jacob)
  • From the new left menu, select Biblical People

The Biblical People tool now opens displaying that person’s family tree as recorded in Scripture.

Related Tutorial Videos:
Biblical People I
Biblical People II

Note: Biblical People is a feature included in Logos Bible Software 4 base packages from Bible Study Library and above.

Logos 4: Quickly Access a Map

mp|seminars Tips

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos training seminars.

Do you ever find yourself needing to refresh your biblical geography as you come across places in the Bible? For example, you’re reading about Paul’s voyage to Rome in Acts 28 and you’d like to see a map displaying his various stops. Here’s all you have to do:

  • Right click on a place in the Bible such as Malta in Acts 28.1
  • From the right menu, select Place your place (in our example, Malta)
  • From the new left menu, select Biblical Places

The Biblical Places tool opens with the map, Paul’s Trip to Rome. You can now refer to the map as you retrace Paul’s ports of call in Acts 28.

Related Tutorial Videos:
Biblical Places – Dynamic Map
Biblical Places – Information
Biblical Places – Maps

Note: Biblical Places is a feature included in Logos Bible Software 4 base packages from Bible Study Library and above.

Bible Book Reading Lists: Discover Each Book in a New Light

signin

Today’s guest blogger is Annie O’Connor, from the Logos Bible Software Design and Editorial team.

Have you ever heard a pastor mention that reading the letters in the New Testament is somewhat like listening to half of a phone conversation? You don’t know what the person on the other end is saying, you only know how the person on your end responded. Of course, we can’t reconstruct the exact details surrounding each letter in the New Testament, but we aren’t completely in the dark either. Many resources (like the ones in your Logos library!) discuss this information and provide a solid context to help us understand what was happening on the other end of the conversation.

Take for example the book of 1 Peter. What is the major theme of this letter? Here’s an excerpt from one resource:

“Peter elaborated upon the subject of suffering throughout the entire epistle. He offered words of hope to his readers as they faced suffering (1:4–5; 5:4). He pictured suffering as purposeful (3:14; 4:14)” (Holman Bible Handbook).

The theme of suffering is significant when you consider the apostle Peter as author of the letter. His acceptance of unjust suffering is remarkable given his previous abhorrence of it. In the gospels, Peter adamantly rejects the notion that Christ should suffer (Mark 8:31-33), and even denies his personal affiliation with Jesus in order to avoid suffering himself (Mark 14:66-72). What a difference, then, that Peter should say “For this is a gracious thing, when, mindful of God, one endures sorrows while suffering unjustly” (1 Peter 2:19, ESV).

Fortunately, each of our base packages offers an array of resources that provide such information on each book of the Bible. The information is in your library, but it isn’t completely organized the way our other Guides are. In order to find this information, you need to open each commentary, Bible dictionary, or handbook individually and navigate to the desired information. We thought, surely, there must be a better way. We decided to take the first step.

In Logos 4.0 we introduced a new tool called Reading Lists (Tools>Reading Lists). This tool allows you to capture locations in resources and organize those locations as hyperlinks under a chosen topic. Using this format, we have created a Reading List for all 66 books of the Bible. This means that you no longer have to manually locate information on these books; the Reading Lists streamline the process. If you want to learn about the book of 1 Peter, the Bible book reading list will link you to articles in your library that address 1 Peter. You can quickly link to various articles discussing the Date, Historical Context and Recipients (what sort of suffering were the letter’s recipients experiencing?) or Authorship, Message, and Purpose (how is Peter’s affiliation with this letter significant?). These categories, though, are only the start. The Reading Lists have 30 categories pertaining to each book.

To jump start the reading lists, we have linked ten resources that provide maximum coverage of resources in our base packages. The next resources in our queue for linking are Eerdman’s Bible Dictionary, The Summarized Bible, The Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary, ISBE, and the New American Commentary Series. The Reading Lists are not limited to these resources, though. Since the Reading Lists are user editable, anyone can add links to any resource they want. That means you! If you don’t see your favorite resource among those already linked, or in our queue, you can add it.

How does that work? Open the Reading List to the book page you want to edit, click “Edit” in the upper right hand corner of the pane. This will open the correct reading list on topics.logos.com. Click “Edit” on that page and you will be able to add links. How do you add links? Open to the introduction for the correct Bible book in your favorite resource, copy the Reading List link, and pasted it in the editing window on topics.logos.com. Divide any headings into the appropriate categories, click “Save” and, presto, your links for your resource are available in the Logos 4.0 Reading Lists.

There are more detailed instructions on our FAQ page.

So, in Logos 4.0, go to Tools>Reading Lists, find the Reading List for the book you want to study and quickly find many articles discussing that book. If you want more resources, just click “Edit” and add them. Happy reading and happy linking!

Logos 4: Vividly Display Repeated Words

mp|seminars Tips

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos training seminars.

As we read a biblical passage and make observations, one of the items we look for is repeated words. Normally words or phrases mentioned multiple times in a passage have particular importance. For example, in John 15 notice the occurrences of fruit. In Philippians 1 take note of the frequent use of gospel. When you locate such a reoccurring word within a given passage, Logos 4 contains a tool, Word Tree (in Original Languages Library and above), that vividly displays the word along with the words in relationship to it. Here’s how to use this helpful feature:

  • Choose Tools | Passage Analysis
  • Select Word Tree
  • Type a biblical reference in the passage box like John 15.1-7
  • Type a word in the box to the right of the passage such as fruit

You’ll notice Logos presents your word and as well as the words in relationship to it. To control the display use the three drop down lists.

In the first list select:

  • Reverse to see all the words leading to your word
  • Forward to see all the words flowing from your word

In the second list select your desired Bible.

In the third list select how to present the words used in relationship to your word. Select:

  • Occurrence toarrange the words in the tree in their biblical order
  • Alphabetical toarrange the words in the tree in their alphabetical order
  • Frequency toarrange the words in the tree by the number of times they appear in the biblical text

Once the tree is generated, you can click on any word in the display to rebuild the tree according to that word. Try using this feature in the observation phase of your Bible study. I think it will help you ask some interesting questions of the text.

Update: Please note that the Passage Analysis tool is only included in the following base packages: Original Lanuguages Library, Scholar’s Library, Scholar’s Library: Silver, Scholar’s Library: Gold, Scholar’s Library: Platinum, and Logos Bible Software 4: Portfolio Edition. To find out which base package is right for you, and see what discounts you qualify for, visit our upgrade page!

Syntax Searching for Everyone: Using Query Forms

Video Tutorial

This is the second in a series of three posts called “Syntax Searching for Everyone”. In this video, we’ll peek at syntax search Query Forms.

What, you don’t know about Query Forms?

You didn’t know that you can just select a search template like “Subject”, fill in a blank, and find all the places where a particular Greek word (or, even better, English) is the subject of the clause?

Well, shame on me for not telling you earlier. But you can. Here’s how.

[Note: The Query Form feature is only available to users who have the Andersen-Forbes Hebrew Syntactic Analysis, the OpenText.org Greek NT Syntactic Analysis, and the Cascadia Syntax Graphs of the New Testament. The Andersen-Forbes and OpenText.org databases are in the Logos 4 Original Languages (LE) package and above; Cascadia is in the Logos 4 Scholar's Silver (LE) package and above.]

For other posts in this series, see:

Syntax Searching for Everyone: Grammatical Relationships

Video Tutorial

Syntax searching is one of the coolest features of Logos Bible Software 4. I mean, to search and find where something is the subject of a clause, or the object of a clause? So, where, say, Peter does something (subject) or where something is done to Peter (object)?

Despite its coolness, some people think that syntax searching in Logos 4 is difficult. And I’ll admit, understanding the intricacies of syntax databases, the theories behind them, and how they represent structures takes work. But you don’t need to actually devise a query to do a syntax search. There are multiple points of entry, and many do not require you to create a syntax query from scratch.

I recently put together a series of three videos titled “Syntax Searching for Everyone” to show how syntax searching can play a part in your study — without writing a query. As simple as a right-mouse click in a reverse interlinear Bible. The three videos are:

  • Syntax Searching for Everyone: Grammatical Relationships
  • Syntax Searching for Everyone: Using Query Forms
  • Syntax Searching for Everyone: Syntax Search Templates

Today’s video is Syntax Searching for Everyone: Grammatical Relationships. I hope it helps you in your study!

Logos 4: Search Words of Christ

mp|seminars Tips

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos training seminars.

A Logos user recently e-mailed me asking how to limit a Bible search to just the words of Christ. For example, he wanted to locate the word servant in the red lettered words of his Bible. Here’s what I told him:

  • Click the Search icon to open the Search panel
  • Select Bible as the search type
  • On the Search line containing numerous drop down lists, click the last list and select an English Bible like the English Standard Version (ESV)
  • Click the second drop down list if using a PC, or the first for Mac users, and select Words of Christ (Words of Christ is a field in most English Bibles much like Name, Address, Zip Code, etc are fields on an application form. With this selection you’re indicating you only want to search the Words of Christ field in your designated Bible. Default is set to All Bible Text.)
  • In the Find box, type your desired word or phrase, such as servant or fear not
  • Click the search arrow in the Find box

Now you’ll see whereyour word or phrase only appears in the red lettered text of the Bible!

Logos 4: OT Quotes in the NT

mp|seminars Tips

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos training seminars.

I recently received an e-mail from a gentleman asking if there was any way to locate all of the Old Testament verses mentioned in the New Testament. You’ll be happy to know the answer is yes! What’s more, Logos even neatly recorded them all in a resource. Here’s how to navigate to the book:

  • Click the Library icon
  • In the Library’s Find box enter this text: type:harmony
    (Note: This will display all of the harmonies contained in your library. You should see the resource, Old Testament Quotations and Allusions in the New Testament, which is included in all base packages with the exception of the Christian Home Library.)
  • Click the title of the resource to open it
  • Click the panel menu of the open resource
  • Select Show table of contents
  • In the contents pane you’ll see both books from the Old Testament (the source of the quote) and New Testament (the destination of the quote)
  • Click the arrow icon next to the title of a biblical book to view the chapters
  • Click a chapter number to jump to that location in the resource

Now you’ll seeboth the source and destination of the quote side-by-side!