Logos 4: Reserve Bookmark 1 for the Passage You’re Studying

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos training seminars and provides many training materials.

mp|seminars TipsYears ago when I prepared my sermons with print books, I of course opened my Bible to the passage I was studying. Knowing I would probably leave that specific location as I turned pages, I placed a ribbon or piece of paper in the Bible to mark my spot. Then, regardless of how far I moved from the week’s text, I easily returned with the aid of the bookmark. Now with Logos, I simply transferred that bookmark habit to my e-books, and I encourage you to do the same:

  • Open your Preferred Bible to the passage you’re studying
  • Press Ctrl + Shift + 1 (Mac: Cmd + Option + Shift + 1) to set the number 1 bookmark
  • Navigate to a different location in the Bible
  • Press Ctrl + 1 (Mac: Cmd + 1) to return to your passage

Get into the habit of reserving Bookmark 1 for the passage you’re studying. Then after wandering from it as you look up cross references, you can easily return with a simple keystroke. This little tip will save you a lot of time as you prepare each week’s sermon or lesson.

This tip comes from our latest DVD training product, Time Saving Tips, vol. 1, available now to pre-order from Logos.com. Watch this tip demonstrated below, and be sure check out Time Saving Tips, vol. 1 for more tips and to order your copy today.

PC Version:

Mac Version:

How do you use your digital bookmarks? What are your top 3 bookmarked resources? Leave a comment letting us and other Logos users know!

Logos 4: Windows and Tiles and Tabs. . .Oh My!

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos training seminars and provides many training materials.

mp|seminars TipsSometimes, while lost in Logos study, you’ll discover you have numerous resources or panels open on the screen. With so much open you can seem to find the Bible, commentary, or guide you’re looking for. So you pause to clean up your desktop.

If you type close all in the Command box and press the Enter key, everything on the screen closes. That’s quick and easy, but then you must reopen just the resources you want.

You may want to try this:

  • Make sure the few resources you want to keep open are in separate tiles
  • Right click on the tab of a resource or panel you want to keep open
  • Select Close Other Tabs which means close the other tabs in this tile, but keep this tab open
  • Repeat the last two steps for other tiles on the screen

Logos 4: Windows, Tiles, and Tabs

By way of reminder here is an official Logos vocabulary review:

  • Windows contain tiles which contain panels (or tabs)
  • You can open as many windows as you want and divide each window into as many tiles as you want and divide each tile into as many panels (tabs) as you want

Logos 4: Windows, Tiles, and Tabs

While learning the Logos tab system, remember to right click on any tab and practice using each option. Pretty soon you’ll be a pro at Logos desktop management!

What does your Logos desktop look like? Leave a comment describing your desktop layout, or upload a screenshot to Facebook and tag Logos Bible Software!

Logos 4: Searching Wuest’s for Bible References

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos training seminars and provides many training materials.

mp|seminars TipsLast week I wrote about a favorite resource of mine, Wuest’s Word Studies in the Greek New Testament. In print, this four volume set consists of Kenneth Wuest’s translation of the NT, commentaries on some NT books, and numerous short articles on various passages and Greek words.

I then explained how to use a Field Search to access his articles about specific Greek words. He also authored numerous short articles about various passages in the New Testament, little mini-commentaries if you will.

Here’s one of several ways you can locate those golden nuggets:

  • Either create a Collection for Wuest’s Word Studies or just open the book on the screen
  • Open a Bible to a New Testament passage such as Ephesians 3:17
  • Right click on any word in the verse
  • From the right menu select Reference “your verse”
  • Select Search Entire Library
  • When the Search panel opens change Entire Library to Wuest’s Word Studies

On the search panel, you’ll now see where Wuest mentioned your reference in his work. If you searched for Ephesians 3:17, you’ll see an article entitled Does He Feel at Home? Click the link to jump to some great insights about one of my favorite verses in the entire Bible!

Let us know, what collections will you create or have you created in order to benefit from this type of search?

Logos 4: Field Search in Wuest’s Word Studies

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos training seminars and provides many training materials.

mp|seminars TipsYears ago one of my favorite resources in print was Wuest’s Word Studies in the Greek New Testament. This four-volume set included Kenneth Wuest’s translation of the NT, commentaries on some NT books, and numerous short articles on various passages and Greek words. Wuest’s goal was to put the Greek language into the hands of the everyday English student of the Bible. His insights into Greek words were wonderful if you could ever find them. The indexing system for the set was not the greatest.

In Logos you can easily access his translation and commentaries. But what about all those articles about Greek words? Here’s a little searching trick that will help:

  • Either create a Collection for Wuest’s Word Studies or just open the book on the screen
  • Click the Search icon
  • Select Basic as the search type (1)
  • Select Wuest’s Word Studies from the drop down list where you select the book(s) to be searched (2)(3)
  • Click the first drop list which usually says All Text (4)
  • Click the arrow next to Search Fields (5)
  • Click the box Large Text (6)

Logos 4: Field Search (Wuest #1)

Logos 4: Field Search (Wuest #2)

Here’s what you have just done. Logos calls the headings of Wuest’s articles, Large Text. You set up a field search indicating you do not want to search all of the text in the resource just the field Large Text!

  • Type temple in the Find box
  • Press the Enter key

You just searched the Large Text field for the word temple. Logos finds an article entitled Temple. Click the link and you are now reading about two Greek words both translated temple in the NT! Try the same search for love, grace, world, etc.! Enjoy the riches of Wuest’s insights into the Greek language.

Logos 4: Field Search (Wuest #3)

Let us know, what percentage of your study time is spent studying Greek?

Logos 4: Topic Study from Home Page

 

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos training seminars and provides many training materials.

mp|seminars TipsIf you’ve been using Logos for even a short period of time, you’ve probably already discovered the Passage box on the Home Page. By entering a passage and clicking Go, you are off and running into the world of Bible study. Did you know, though, you can also study a topic or subject from the Home Page passage box? Try this:

  • Type sanctification in the passage box on the Home Page.
  • Notice the first entry in the drop down list is Search for sanctification. (See Image 1)
  • Go ahead and click Search for sanctification.

Image 1.
Logos 4: Topic Study (1)

At this point, a search panel opens. The Library Results section in the panel displays every occurrence of the word sanctification in your entire library. At the top is a section called Topic in which links to articles with the headword Sanctification are listed. Look carefully and you’ll see also links to articles called Consecration which is closely related to sanctification. When searching for a “subject,” Logos takes the initiative to search for related topics.

The line Search for (Sanctification, “Entire Sanctification”, Consecration,…) instead? is hyperlinked (See Image 2). When clicked, Logos will automatically search for all occurrences of each of these terms and update the hits in the Library Results section (See Image 3)!

Image 2.
Logos 4: Topic Study (2)

Image 3.
Logos 4: Topic Study (3)

As you can see, Logos is not only powerful; it is very easy to use!

How has Logos made your study time easier? Let us know by leaving a comment with your time saving tip.

Logos 4: Hide Preferred Bible Section on Home Page

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos training seminars and provides many training materials.

mp|seminars TipsIn your Logos library, you have dozens of Bibles.  Among these, you obviously have your favorite Bible which is called your Preferred Bible in Logos. In the ribbon (narrow band at the top) of the Home Page you can designate your Preferred Bible which looks up cross references as you study with Logos resources.
 
After designating your Preferred Bible, you’re probably not going to change it very often (if at all), so you don’t need to see the Choose preferred Bible section in the ribbon. It is taking up valuable space which could be used to display a Prayer List or Reading Plan. Here’s how easy it is to hide the Choose preferred Bible section:

  • Choose the Customize menu in the lower left corner of the Home Page (1)
  • Uncheck the box Choose preferred Bible in the Features section of the menu (2)

Logos 4: Hide Choose Preferred Bible

That’s it. That section will remain hidden in the ribbon until you check this box again!

What is your preferred Bible? Let us know by leaving a comment with your favorite verse using your preferred Bible translation.

Biblical People, Places, and Things

We are in the midst of forum week and are excited to bring you another training post by forum MVP Mark Barnes. Mark is the pastor of Bethel Evangelical Church in Swansea, UK, and author of the Unofficial Tutorial Videos for Logos 4.

One of the great features in Logos Bible Software 4 is the Bible Facts tool, otherwise known as Biblical People, Biblical Places and Biblical Things. These three tools come with most Logos 4 base packages, and gather an immense amount of information from across your library in seconds. If you’re interested in a person, place or even a “thing” in the Bible, then these tools should be your first port of call. In this tutorial, we’re going to concentrate on Biblical Places (but Biblical People and Things work in just the same way).

Accessing Biblical Places

There are four ways to get access to Biblical Places. The easiest is to choose Biblical Places from the tools menu and then type the name of the place you want in the Biblical Places reference box, or use the Passage Guide (if the passage you’ve chosen mentions a place by name). Advanced users sometimes prefer to type “open biblical places” or even “open biblical places to Antioch” in the command bar. But another great way to access it to right click on a place name in most Bibles, make sure that Place is selected on the right-hand side of the menu, then click Biblical Places on the left. (Click on the images below to see them full sized.)

A Wealth of Information

Once Biblical Places is open to the place you’re interested in you’ll find it incredibly easy to access a wealth of information about that place.

In the top ribbon bar, you’ll find from left to right:

  1. A brief description of the place, and a list of all the Bible verses where it’s mentioned (you can click the … to see more). Biblical Places knows when the same place has different names, and where two different places have the same name. So if you select Jerusalem, Logos also includes references to the City of David that refer to Jerusalem, but doesn’t include the references to City of David that refer to Bethlehem.
  2. A list of all the dictionary articles about that place
  3. Other relevant links (to related places, people or things; to Wikipedia; and to Google maps)
  4. An overview of the map currently displayed in the main window

In the bottom ribbon bar you’ll find from left to right:

  • Thumbnails of interactive Logos maps that mention the place
  • A thumbnail of the special interactive Biblical World Map
  • Thumbnails of Logos InfoGraphics that are related to this place
  • Thumbnails of static maps and images from many resources in your library that are related to this place

If you can’t see all this on your screen, click the small left and right arrows at the end of the ribbon bars to scroll, or maximise the window to make it bigger. You can hover over any of the thumbnails in the bottom bar, to see a preview. Then just click to have it shown in the main window. (In the Biblical People tool, the maps are replaced by Family Trees and other diagrams showing the relationships between people.)

If you can’t see the image or map very well, you can use the ‘Actual Size’ and ‘Fit’ buttons at the top of the screen to change the zoom level, or you can use the mouse-wheel to zoom more precisely. If the map or image is bigger than the window, you can grab it to scroll around. If you want to use the map or image elsewhere, you can right-click on it to copy, save, print or send it to Powerpoint.

Interactive Maps vs. Static Maps

You’ll notice from the list above that there are two types of maps shown, and understanding the different will prevent much head-scratching later. On the left are interactive maps, sometimes called dynamic maps. These were created especially by Logos for the Biblical Places tool. On the right are static maps, which come from other resources in your library. What makes interactive maps so much better than static maps is that with interactive maps:

  • You can zoom right in and still have fantastic quality
  • You can hover over any of the place names to get a brief description
  • You can click on any place name to switch Biblical Places to focus on that place
  • You can open Google Maps to any location on the map (and therefore get a contemporary satellite view, or see what modern towns are nearby)
  • You can use the Find Tool (CTRL+F) to locate other places on the map
  • You can measure distances between two points

Most places will have several maps, but there’s one interactive map that’s worth pointing out specifically. It’s the Biblical World map, and it’s always the right-most interactive map (the last one before the Infographics and static images/maps). The Biblical World map is important because it lists every place. As you zoom in, more and more detail is added, and it should be your map of choice when you want to see how a place relates to other places nearby, as in the screenshot below.

Let me finish by showing you how to measure distances between two places on any interactive map (there’s more information about the other features mentioned in the video below). All you need to do is hold down the CTRL button, then click the mouse button on the place you want to start calculating this distance from. Then, continue to hold the button and move the mouse around the map. The distance calculated as you do, in both miles and kilometres. You can see below that Gilgal is nearly 30 miles from Joppa.

 

If you never used the full power of Biblical Places, why not try some these features now? But this tutorial has explained only some of the great features available. To find out even more, you can watch or download the Unofficial Tutorial video on Bible Facts, which also covers Biblical People and Biblical Things.

Have a Logos 4 feature that you would like to see a post on? Leave us a comment and let us know! Then head over the forums to check out Forum Week.

Lectionary-Based Study with Logos: Part 2

SproulThis is the second half to last week’s Lectionary-Based Study with Logos: Part 1 by Louis St. Hilaire, Logos Bible Software’s Catholic Product Manager.

Using Lectionary Resources in Logos Bible Software

Lectionary resources in Logos Bible Software are designed to make it easy to find the text for the day and to read it in the Bible translation of your choice.

The readings are arranged by calendar date and the book automatically opens at the next set of readings. For each Sunday or feast, the title, the season and the liturgical color is given. The text of the readings for the day is displayed in the translation you specify at the top of the panel, and links are provided that you can use to open your Bible or right-click to quickly open up Logos guides, tools and searches for deeper study and sermon preparation. (Click the images to see them full size.)

Lectionary Readings for the Day

For more general study, you can also find a complete listing of readings organized by liturgical event (i.e. more like a print lectionary that you can re-use year to year) in the “Index of Readings” found at the end of the lectionary.

The home page ribbon also gives you quick access to your lectionary. It displays the title and readings for the next Sunday and opens up your lectionary when you click.

To get your preferred lectionary to show up, prioritize it from Library.

In addition, the “Lectionaries” section of the Passage Guide allows you to quickly see where the passage you’re studying appears in your lectionaries. How and where a passage is used in a lectionary reveals important ways that your passage has been used in worship in connection with other passages or important feasts.

Passage Guide

To get this section to show up in your Passage Guide, click “Add” on the Passage Guide title bar and select “Lectionaries”.

Helps & Commentaries Geared Toward the Lectionary

Besides the lectionary resources mentioned in Part I, Logos also has several commentaries and sermon preparation helps that are specifically geared toward use with a lectionary:

Do you use a lectionary? Leave us a comment and let us know which one.

Logos 4: Clear Your Desktop with One Click

mp|seminars TipsLast Monday’s blog, “Quickly Clean Up a Messy Desktop,” generated some good discussion. One particular comment, given by a Mr. Joe Bella, gave another user a tip for clearing their screen using the Close all command.

We give many tips and shortcuts throughout Camp Logos and in the Camp Logos LIVE DVDs, and this is one of those tips!

There will be times when you are using Logos 4 that you’ll want to clear all of the open resources, tools, and guides that are open on your screen. You can either close each panel individually or use a shortcut:

  • In the Command box, type close all

If you press Enter, the screen will clear. But what if you wanted that command on your Shortcuts bar?

  • Type close all in the Command box (do not press Enter) (See image 1.)
  • Click and drag the Close all command to your Shortcuts bar (See image 2.)

Image 1:

Close-All Toolbar

Image 2:

Close-All Toolbar

You’ll now see a Close all icon on your Shortcuts bar. Whenever you want to clear your screen, just click the icon!

Close-All Toolbar

Do you use your Shortcuts toolbar? If yes, what are some of your favorite shortcuts? Let us know by leaving us a comment.

Logos 4: Quickly Clean Up a Messy Desktop

mp|seminars TipsWhen I primarily studied with print books, I normally spread them out on my desk and quite often “lost” resources as they became buried under others. Where is that commentary? I know it was here a minute ago. I’m sure you can relate.

If we’re not careful the same thing can happen with Logos. We get lost in study and pretty soon we have numerous Bibles, commentaries, dictionaries and the like, all scattered about on the Logos desktop. We may lose valuable study time with a cluttered desk.

Well, help is on the way. If you want to quickly clean up that messy desktop try this:

  • Choose the Layouts menu
  • Click one of the prearranged layouts (the light gray boxes) in the lower left of the menu
Logos 4: Layouts

Logos 4: Layouts

Please notice that Logos tries its best to organize your open resources, placing Bibles with Bibles, commentaries with commentaries, and so on. I only wish someone would do that with my print books on my desk!

What do you think about the preset Layouts? Do you use them, or do you create your own? Let us know by leaving us a comment. Then, feel free to share your Layout with others by uploading a screen capture to Facebook and tagging Logos!