Logos 4: Visual Filter for a Greek Lemma

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos seminars and provides many training materials.

mp|seminars Tips

In response to a recent blog about Visual Filters a Logos user e-mailed the following to me:

I am enjoying very much your “how to” explanations in Logostalk, especially the recent post about using visual filters.  I have begun to create my own and I am very interested in this functionality. 

What I would like to know is how can I create a visual filter for a Greek word and have the filter show up on the translated English word.  For instance, I would like to create a visual filter for the Greek word “epignosis” and have the English word highlighted.

Here’s what I told him:

The easiest way to produce the filter for a Greek word and have it highlighted in English is to generate a Greek lemma search:

  • Open an English Bible (which contains the reverse interlinear option such as ESV, NASB, NKJV, or LEB) to a location where your desired word appears, in this case Colossians 1:6
  • Right click on the word (1) and select Lemma  “your word” | Search this resource. (2) (3)
  • Click Make filter on the Search panel which opens the Visual Filter panel with your search term already entered. (4)
  • Select a Formatting style for the word and name the filter. (5) (6)

Logos searches the underlying Greek text in the English Bible with the reverse interlinear data and then highlights the corresponding English text!

To add additional words to this same filter, so you don’t end up with a different filter for each individual word (because each time you click Make filter Logos creates a new visual filter):

  • Execute a lemma search as explained above
  • Copy / paste the search query from the search panel to the Visual Filter panel. (7)
  • Select a Formatting style for this new entry. (8)

VisualFilterForLemma1.jpg

 

VisualFilterForLemma2.jpg

 

VisualFilterForLemma3.jpg

Of course, the same instructions apply to a Hebrew lemma in the Old Testament.

This type of Visual Filter is a great way to distinguish Hebrew or Greek synonyms which are translated with the same English word. For example, create filters for the various Hebrew words translatedpraise. Make filters for the different Greek words translated love.

This is but one of the many features we discuss in the Camp Logos 2 Live video training series, which emphasizes using original language tools for the English student.

How do you use visual filters to study the Biblical text? Leave a comment and let us know!

Searching through Logos’ Free YouTube Tutorials


A couple of weeks ago we showed you how to find free Logos help on YouTube by sharing some of the YouTube playlists we’ve created.

But what if you’re looking for a quick tutorial on a specific feature? Searching the Logos YouTube channel is simple. All 300 videos in our YouTube library are titled and tagged to help you find exactly what you’re looking for.

To run your search, find the search bar in the upper right hand corner of the channel (1). Type in the topic or feature you’d like to learn more about, and click “Enter”. Any videos relevant to your search will appear below.

By default, your search results are displayed collectively (2). If more than one video appears, there may be a series on that topic or feature. Try sorting your search by Playlists (3). Some tools and features have their own playlists, like “Searching in Logos 4” or “Notes and Reading Lists.”

Try doing a search on these popular features, and begin mastering your software today!

Basic

  • Reading Plans
  • Passage Guide
  • Searching

Advanced

  • Customizable Guides
  • Drawing Mode
  • Dynamic, Rule-based collections
  • Tags

Also, check out these new playlists:

Have a favorite Logos video? Let our readers know about it in the comments!

Logos 4: Locate Hebrew or Greek Synonyms for a Biblical Word

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos seminars and provides many training materials.

mp|seminars Tips

A Logos user recently emailed this question to me:

Is there a way I can search the Bible to find every synonym for “sin”?

The answer is a resounding yes and we get to use one of my favorite Logos features: the Translation ring in the Bible Word Study.

  • Choose Guides | Bible Word Study.
  • Type sin in the Word box. (1)
  • Press the Enter key to generate the report.

The Hebrew Words and Greek Words sections display all of the Hebrew and Greek words translated sin in the Bible of your choice (as indicated on the blue section title bar). In essence these are the synonyms for sin in the Bible. Of course this exercise is not picking up Hebrew and Greek words translated trespassoffence, etc. which also could be synonyms for sin.

  • Click a Hebrew or Greek word outside the ring to list the verses in which that word is translated sin. (2)
  • Click the Hebrew or Greek lemma next to the word count to generate a report for that word. (3)

Notice the Translation ring in this second report displays the various ways this Hebrew or Greek lemma is translated in English, again in the Bible of your choice. (4)

BWS-for-Sin.jpg

By going around the Hebrew and Greek rings in the first report, we can open additional Bible Word Study reports for each word, thereby being well on our way to a biblical understanding of the original concept, in this case sin.

How do you use the translation ring in the Bible Word Study tool? Leave a comment and let us know!

Logos 4: A Greek Visual Filter for the English Student

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos seminars and provides many training materials.

mp|seminars Tips

Thank you for reading this blog. Now here’s a question. Did I just thank you, an individual reader, or did I thank you all as the collective group of readers? In other words, is the you singular or plural? You can’t answer decisively because you in English can be either. The language of the New Testament, Greek, makes a distinction between singular and plural pronouns, but not all English Bibles maintain that distinction. They use you for both singular and plural occurrences.

For example, Luke 22:31-32 is translated as follows in the NASB:

“Simon, Simon, behold, Satan has demanded permission to sift you like wheat; but I have prayed for you…”

Are these you’s singular or plural or both? Impossible to say for certain just by observing English. A Morphological Visual Filter, however, can help us easily answer the question.

  • Choose File | Visual Filter.
  • Select Morph as the filter type (1).
  • Select from the drop down lists All Morph Text, New Testament, All Resources, and Logos Greek Morphology (2).
  • Type the @ symbol in the Find box which alerts Logos that this is going to be a Morph search (3).
  • Select Pronoun from  the Part of Speech drop down list (4).
  • Select Singular from the Number column (5).
  • Click the arrow icon to save the morph code in the Find box (6).
  • Select from the Formatting list a style such as Box (7).
  • Type the @ symbol in the additional Find box that appears (8).
  • Select Pronoun from  the Part of Speech drop down list (9).
  • Select Plural from the Number column (10).
  • Click the arrow icon to save the morph code in the Find box (11).
  • Select from the Formatting list a style such as Double Box (12).

GreekVisualFilter1.jpg

 

GreekVisualFilter2.jpg

 

GreekVisualFilter3.jpg

 

You have just instructed Logos to place a box around all singular pronouns and a double box around all plural pronouns in the New Testament of Bibles containing the Logos Greek Morphology. Now open an English Bible like the ESV, NASB, NKJV, or LEB to Luke 22:31The filtering on the underlying Greek morphology is shining through to the English surface text which certainly assists our study of any passage!

GreekVisualFilter4.jpg

Do you see anything interesting in Luke 22:31-32?

If you enjoy this type of power usage of Logos then you’ll find Camp Logos 2 Live DVD Training very helpful. It’s packed full of instruction and application on how to use Logos original language features for the English student.

How can understanding the Greek meaning of a word help your study of the Bible in English? Leave a comment and let us know!

Logos 4: Place Highlighting Notes in Book Specific Note Files

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos seminars and provides many training materials. mp|seminars Tips

In my previous two blogs I explained that in Logos 4.5 each time we highlight text, that highlighted text becomes a Highlighting Note placed in whatever Note File we designate. Let’s combine those features for a specific application. Let’s say we’re reading and highlighting Biblical Ethics (Ethics) by Oswald Chambers. We want all of these and only these Highlighting Notes in one Note File.

  • Choose File | Notes to create a new Note File.
  • Name the Note File Biblical Ethics (or the title of whatever book you’re reading).
  • Choose Tools | Highlighting.
  • Decide which palette of Highlighting styles you’re going to use to mark up Ethics, such as Solid Colors which we’ll employ in our example.
  • Rest the cursor on the name of the palette such as Solid Colors.
  • Click the arrow that appears at the right of the title bar for the palette (1).
  • Click the Save in drop down list at the bottom of the menu (2).
  • Click Most recent note file (3).

You’ve just instructed Logos to place all of your Highlighting Notes created with Solid Colors in the most recently used Note File which in this case is Biblical Ethics. Read and mark up Ethics which places all of those Highlighting Notes in the Note File Biblical Ethics. If you want you can use the Print / Export option on the panel menu of the Note File to produce a hard or digital copy of those notes. While this is not the only way to accomplish this result, here’s a great advantage to utilizing the method I just described.

We’re probably going to be reading several books at the same time and in all likelihood prefer using the same palette of styles. If so, with this method all we have to do is create a Note File for each book we’re reading and make sure to open it before highlighting any text in the book. Remember, our Highlighting Notes made with Solid Colors go to the most recently used Note File.

So if you’re reading another book such as Concise Theology by J. I. Packer, create a Note File for it. Read and mark up the book which places those Solid Colors notes in the Concise Theology Note File. To switch back to the Biblical Ethics Note File just open it. Now markup text in Ethics which places those new Notes in the most recently used Note File which again is Biblical Ethics!

I know this may sound confusing, but after you apply this method a couple of times, it will work as silk for you. And remember, you can download for FREE the new Notes and Highlighting chapters from the updated Logos Bible Software Training Manuals Volumes 1 and 2. Enjoy!

What new highlighting feature have you found the most helpful? Leave a comment and let us know!

Logos 4: Place All Search Results in One Panel

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos seminars and provides many training materials.

mp|seminars Tips

If you’ve been to Camp Logos before you know that I’m a big fan of the right click menu. If you haven’t been then I encourage you to open a Bible in Logos and start right clicking. You can access many powerful features through this context sensitive menu that appears when you right click on a word.  This shortcut menu is especially helpful for searching. You can search for English words and phrases, Hebrew and Greek lemmas, references and more with the right click menu. You’ll notice, though, each time you execute a right mouse search you open a separate search panel. Generate five searches and get five search panels. It doesn’t take long to slow down your study as you try to navigate through all these search panels on the screen. Here’s how to avoid that:

  • Close all but one search panel
  • Choose the panel menu on that one search panel (A).
  • Select Send searches here (B).
  • Notice Logos places a target on the search panel menu (C).

Place All Search Results in One Panel

Now when you generate a right mouse search, the current search results will be removed and the new search hits will take their place!

If you need to get back to a previous search just click the Search History icon to the right of the search box.

This is but one of the numerous shortcuts contained on the New Time Saving Tips Volume 2 that Logos just posted as a Pre-pub.

The more shortcuts you use, the more streamlined your Bible study with Logos becomes. Most of these shortcuts come right out of my own personal use of the software.

You can read all about this new video training and place your order at the Logos website.

What Logos 4 shortcut do you use that you think is the most helpful? Leave a comment and let us know!

Find Free Logos Help on YouTube

When we first started making software in 1992, it was impossible to predict all of the ways that technology would influence how we gather, interact with, and process information. Streaming video is a perfect example of a revolution that no one in the early nineties saw coming.

YouTube, started by three former PayPal employees in 2005, has been a huge game changer. The video site has revolutionized everything from politics to education. In fact, there are over 92 billion videos viewed each month by over 490 million unique users.

We think YouTube is a fantastic way for Logos users to pick up helpful tips and tricks for using their software, so we’ve created a YouTube channel.  You’ll find hundreds of free videos to help you get more out of your Bible study, including software tutorials for PC, Mac, and Mobile formats, as well as product demonstrations and fun behind-the-scenes videos.

To make all of these easier to find, we’ve divided our videos into playlists.

Tutorial Videos:

Other Resources:

The best way to keep up-to-date is to subscribe to our YouTube channel. Subscribing gives you access to exclusive sneak-peeks at new products, features, and updates. So subscribe now and start watching hundreds of free, high quality videos which will help you better understand Logos and go deeper in your Bible study.

Is there something you’d like to see on our YouTube channel? Leave us a comment!

Logos 4: Select a Note File for Highlighting Notes

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos seminars and provides many training materials.

mp|seminars Tips

In last week’s blog I explained how with the newly released Logos 4.5, highlighted text now becomes a new Note in a Note File. Every time we highlight text, that marked up text becomes part of the title of a new Note in a Note File. But which Note File? By default, Logos places the Highlighting Notes in a Note File with the same name as the highlighting palette. For example, text highlighted with the style On Fire goes to a Note File named Emphasis Markup (the palette containing the On Fire style). Text highlighted with the style Israel goes to a Note File named Inductive (the palette containing the Israel style).

We can, however, select a different destination Note File for each highlighting palette used:

  • Choose Tools | Highlighting
  • Rest the cursor on the name of a Highlighting palette like Inductive (1).
  • Click the drop down menu (arrow icon) that appears on the right of the pal­ette title bar (2).
  • Click the drop down menu (arrow icon) on the Save in section at the bottom of the menu (3).
  • Select (4):
    • Palette-specific note file to save Notes created with this palette of styles in the Note File bearing the name of the Highlighting palette (as explained above).
    • Most recent note file to save Notes created with this palette of styles in the Note File that was most recently active or used.
    • A note file from the list of all note files to save Notes created with this palette of styles in that specific Note File (existing Note Files created on the File menu will be listed here).

SelectNoteFile-HighlightingNotes.jpg

Please note, EXISTING Highlighting Notes created with styles from this palette will NOT be affected. All future Highlighting Notes created with styles from this palette, however, will now be saved in this designated Note File.

You can download for FREE the new Notes and Highlighting chapters from the updated Logos Bible Software Training Manuals Volumes 1 and 2.

 

How do you use notes and highlights to study? Leave a comment and let us know!

Logos 4: Logos 4.5 Highlights Equal Notes

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos seminars and provides many training materials.

mp|seminars Tips

The recently released Logos 4.5 contains numerous new features especially in the areas of Notes and Highlighting. For the next few blogs I’d like to walk you some of these exciting enhancements.

The main point to now remember about highlighting is that every time you highlight text in a resource, that highlight becomes a Note in a Note File. A highlight equals a Note. For example,

  • Open a Logos resource
  • Choose Tools | Highlighting
  • Expand a highlighting palette such as Highlighter Pens (A) to reveal specific styles such as Blue Highlighter 
  • Select text in the resource (B)
  • Click Blue Highlighter in the Highlighting panel (C)

Notice several things that occurred simultaneously:

  • The selected text gets highlighted with the blue pen (B)
  • Logos indicates at the bottom of the Highlighting panel that an Annotation (Note) has been added to the Note File named Highlighted Pens (D)
  • Choose the File menu to see that newly created Note File named Highlighter Pens (E)
  • Click the Note File on the File menu or at the bottom of the Highlighting panel to open it

highlight-equals-note.jpg

By default, every time you highlight text with a Highlighter Pen it will be added to this same Note File!

In a future blog you’ll learn to change the Note File to which these Highlights are added. In case you can’t wait, you can download for FREE the new Notes and Highlighting chapters from the updated Logos Bible Software Training Manuals Volumes 1 and 2.

What is your favorite Logos 4.5 update? Leave a comment and let us know!

Logos 4: A Daily Devotion with Carson’s Books and M’Cheyne’s Bible Reading Plan

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos seminars and provides many training materials.

mp|seminars Tips

Several people have e-mailed me recently asking my suggestions on using D.A. Carson’s calendar devotionals, For the Love of God, Volumes 1 and 2, into a daily quiet time. So here are some thoughts. First, Carson’s books incorporate Robert M’Cheyne’s Bible reading plan, which takes us through the New Testament and Psalms twice a year and the rest of Scripture once. For each day’s reading, Carson offers some insights and encouragement. If you own these volumes, make sure to read the Preface and Introduction, in which the author explains his goals for the books.

Now here’s a way to incorporate both M’Cheyne’s plan and Carson’s books into a daily devotion time:

  • Open For the Love of God, Volume 1 and/or Volume 2.
  • If you open both, link them together by choosing the panel menu on each and selecting Link Set A on each as well (A).
  • Choose the panel menu on one of the books and select Show table of contents.
  • Select Title Page from the contents pane (B).
  • Close the table of contents.
  • Open your Preferred Bible (C).
  • Arrange the resources as you like on the screen.
  • Choose the Layouts menu.
  • Name the Now snapshot something like Quiet Time.
  • Return to the Layouts menu and drag your newly created Named Layout to the Shortcuts bar (D).
  • Each day, click the new shortcut icon to load this Quiet Time layout.

When the layout loads, please notice on the title page of For the Love of God a link called Today’s Reading (E). Click the link to move Carson’s book(s) to today’s date.

CarsonMcheyneReadingPlan.jpg

 

Now click a Bible reference link in Carson’s book to move your preferred Bible to that location. Click each Bible reference link in Carson’s to complete M’Cheyne’s Bible reading plan for the day.

I truly hope this simple layout will assist you in your daily walk with the Lord.

If you don’t yet own Carson’s books, I think you’ll be encouraged by them.

What is your favorite devotional to read each day? Leave a comment and let us know!