Announcing the Anchor Yale Bible Reference Library

Anchor Yale Bible Reference Library (28 Vols.)

The Anchor Yale Bible Reference Library is the third major component to the Anchor Yale Bible Group, which also includes the Anchor Yale Bible and the Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary. The Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary has been available for Logos Bible Software for a few years, and the Anchor Yale Bible became available earlier this year. Now we’re set to begin work on the remaining books in the Anchor Yale Bible Group—the Anchor Yale Bible Reference Library.

The 28 volumes in this collection cover a wide variety of sub-disciplines in the broader field of biblical studies, including books on archaeology, geography, history, languages and linguistics, philosophy, and theology, to name a few. These books present the best contemporary scholarship in a way that is accessible not only to scholars but also to educated non-specialists.

This series contains many books which have become classics in their fields:

  • The collection contains Raymond Brown’s volumes on the Passion Narrative and his Introduction to the Gospel of John. Brown’s book on John was intended to replace his 2-volume commentary in the Anchor Yale Bible, but the project was interrupted by his death in 1998. Francis J. Maloney edited Brown’s manuscript for publication, and it appeared in the Anchor Yale Reference Library in 2003.
  • John P. Meier’s 4-volume (and 3,102-page) work on the historical Jesus is also included in the collection. His books, along with N.T. Wright’s, are essential reading on the subject.
  • James H. Charlesworth’s 2-volume Old Testament Pseudepigrapha is a monumental work on Wisdom literature, Psalms, prayers, Judeo-Hellenistic works, and other pseudepigraphal literature.

The Anchor Yale Bible Reference Library has also attracted the attention of mainstream media outlets. Substantial reviews of some of these books have appeared in recent years in magazines like Newsweek and the New York Times.

These 28 volumes retail at roughly $1,300.00, but we’re initially offering them on Pre-Pub for $499.95. To put this in perspective on a smaller scale, the average retail price per volume is $46.09, but you can pick these up on Pre-Pub right now for $17.86 each. We can promise this price won’t last more than a few weeks, so make sure you place your order today.

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Resources for Shepherds

Jesus was unequivocal; “In this world you will have trouble.” If you have at least one friend, then you know someone acquainted with grief. If you are in ministry then you don’t need to be told that our churches are filled with the hurting, the wounded, the sick and the lonely. In ministry, helping those who suffer is often the task for which we are least equipped.

The Christian Focus Counseling Collection is a great tool to augment your counseling/care skill set. Included are eight volumes from Christian Focus Publications that are perfect to enable you to revisit a whole host of care-driven ministry needs.

In this collection are books to:

  • Help you understand and minister to those suffering from depression with both a Biblical and medical understanding
  • Minister to the grieving through the lens of the Old Testament book of Lamentations
  • Provide a healthy, theological and balanced look at miraculous healing
  • Enable you to understand and minister to couple dealing with infertility issues
  • Empower you to provide pastoral visitations that are spiritually nourishing
  • Equip others with a self image that is based on a sound and uplifting Christian worldview

The beauty of having resources like this in your Logos Bible Software is that each word is essentially a link to more resources within your library and allowing deeper and more illuminating study. Scripture references are linked to your favorite translation and even original language resources. Studying has never been so uncomplicated and enriching.

If you are looking for more counseling resources for you library make sure you check out the Christian Counseling Product Guide!

Yes, Jesus was quite clear that “In this world you will have trouble.” And it is our sacred responsibility to ensure that we can flesh out his follow-up encouragement, “But take heart! I have overcome the world!

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What’s in My Library: Bible (Literal)

Today’s guest post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos training seminars. In this series, Morris answers the question, “What’s in my library?”

English Standard VersionBible (Literal)

Definition: The Bible was originally written in the Hebrew and Greek languages. Our English Bibles are based on the Hebrew and Greek manuscripts. A literal translation of the Bible seeks as much as possible to give a word for word translation from Hebrew or Greek to English. Literal translations of the Bible should be used when conducting more serious Bible study.

Example: English Standard Version

Application: If you are not familiar with original languages, but want to do serious Bible study getting as close as possible to the original meaning of the text with an English Bible, then you want to rely on literal translations like the ESV, KJV, NKJV, or NASB.

For more tips like this, be sure to visit Morris Proctor’s mpSeminars website and his Tips & Tricks blog.

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Laughing All the Way to the West Bank

The medicinal benefits of laughing are well documented:

  • A good, strong laugh provides a heart rate increase equal to 15 minutes of biking
  • Laughter decreases stress and increases immune cells and infection-fighting antibodies, thus improving resistance to disease
  • Laughing helps to deepen breathing, improving respiration
  • A hearty laugh relieves tension, reduces stress and can leave your muscles relaxed for up to 45 minutes

It leaves one to wonder why, if there are so many advantages to laughing, is there so little levity in the Scriptures? Any physical benefits of laughing were designed and hardwired into us by the Creator himself, so would it be so difficult for him to tell a casual joke? To use the periodic pun? To exchange the occasional bon mot?

An article in Bible Study Magazine suggests that perhaps He did. Samuel Lamerson, Dean of
Faculty and Associate Professor of New Testament at Knox Seminary in Fort Lauderdale, proposes that perhaps the disconnect between us and the funnier comments and stories Jesus told is cultural—maybe we just don’t understand what they would have found funny in Palestine 2,000 years ago. He also suggests that perhaps we just don’t like the idea of a jovial Jesus and prefer to picture our Savior as a “man of many sorrows, acquainted with grief.” Lamerson walks us through some examples of stories Jesus told which his listeners would have found humor in, showing that Jesus may have been a little more wry than we would typically admit.

Bible Study Magazine provides many previews of these kinds of amazing articles, as well as interactive tools to accompany many of the articles in print. But subscribing today is the only way to ensure you don’t miss a single issue.

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John MacArthur Reveals Bible Study Methods


John MacArthur has been studying the Bible an average of 25–30 hours per week for most of his life, and at 70 years old, he shows no signs of slowing down.

A resolute believer in the dedicated study of Scripture to help Christians grow in their faith, he is a best-selling author, popular conference speaker and president of Grace to You—a non-profit organization overseeing his diverse multi-media outreach, including radio and television programs, website resources and more.

In the November–December issue of Bible Study Magazine, John MacArthur shares his advice on a wide variety of Bible study related topics.

In the interview, Dr. MacArthur answers such questions as:


  • When you open a Bible, what is the first thing you do?
  • How should someone with no experience whatsoever with Christianity or the church begin to study the Bible? What are some basic pointers you can offer them?
  • In what ways is the Old Testament applicable for today’s Christian? What about things like the sacrifices in Leviticus—how are they applicable?
  • How would you study the Bible with someone who does not have the conviction that it is the Word of God?
  • Why should we study the Bible?
  • What is the difference between reading the Bible and studying the Bible?
  • With all the resources on Bible study out there, why do we need new resources on Bible study?
  • How can we encourage other people to study the Bible?
  • How much of your time is spent studying the Bible?
  • What role does historical criticism play in the way you study the Bible?
  • How do you decipher a difficult passage?
  • How do you prepare your sermons, or conduct research for your books? What tools do you use?
  • What are some of the methods you have found that make Bible study appealing to a larger community?
  • If you could study alongside any biblical author or character, besides Jesus, who would you choose?

Whether you’re a pastor, teacher, student or disciple of the Word, there’s a lot to glean from Dr. MacArthur’s years of experience. His responses to the questions above will inspire, challenge, and help you fine-tune your own time in the Word.

If you are already a subscriber to Bible Study Magazine you should receive the MacArthur issue the first week or so of November. If you were one of the original subscribers, you need to make sure you have renewed your subscription so you will continue receiving the magazine.

If you have not yet subscribed to Bible Study Magazine, you are really missing out. Subscribe now and you can start off with the fantastic November–December issue with John MacArthur’s interview on Bible study, as well as J.I. Packer’s interview on “A Balanced Bible Study Diet”, incredible articles and special sections like “Remembering to Remember the Goodness of God”, “Away in a Manger, but Not in a Barn: An Archaeologist Examines the Nativity Scene”, “The Prophets—A Start to Finish Bible Study Guide”, “Composing the Bible—Transmission, Translation & Context”, and so much more.

P.S. Don’t forget to check out the 100+ MacArthur titles available for Logos Bible Software!

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How to Get Extra Books for Free

One of the cardinal rules of the Pre-Pub program is that ordering early guarantees you’ll get the lowest price. We always reward our users who pre-order the earliest with the lowest prices—including two people who picked up one collection for 99% off the retail price.

There’s another benefit to ordering early that we don’t talk about too much: When you place your Pre-Pub order for a collection, you are also placing a Pre-Pub order for any future books we may add to the collection while it’s still on Pre-Pub. Usually when we add new books to a collection, we raise the price to cover the additional costs. Pre-ordering early not only locks you in at the lowest price—you also pick up the extra books added to the collection while it’s on Pre-Pub at no additional charge.

We expand collections for a variety of reasons. Sometimes, new books in a series are published after we put a collection on Pre-Pub, but before it ships. For example, six new titles have been published in the Opening Up Commentary Collection since we first put it on Pre-Pub, so we’ve added them to the collection. The Everyman’s Bible Commentary and the Face2face Collection each picked up an additional volume for the same reason.

Other times, it makes sense to add new books to an existing collection. When we received permission to publish two books and three journal articles by Charles Ryrie, the Charles Ryrie Legacy Collection was the logical place to include them. We also added two books to the Kress Biblical Studies Collection for the same reason.

Calvin 500 Collection (108 Vols.)

We receive lots of feedback on collections we post, and sometimes we expand collections based on suggestions from our users. For example, after we posted the Calvin 500 Collection in honor of Calvin’s 500th birthday, we received suggestions from Calvin enthusiasts around the world who wanted additional books on Calvin. We were able to add eleven new books on Calvin’s life and the history of Calvinism to the Calvin 500 Collection.

Occasionally, new books slated for Pre-Pub fit really well into an existing collection. That was the case with Biblical Greek Language and Linguistics, edited by Stanley Porter and D.A. Carson, so we added it to the Studies in New Testament Greek and JSNTS Collection.

The Holman Reference Collection was also expanded to include 131 Christians Everyone Should Know and Steven L. Cox and Kendell H. Easley’s Harmony of the Gospels.

If you pre-ordered any of these collections before we added new books, you still get the entire collection—including the new books—at your original Pre-Pub price. Remember, you need to act before the collection ships in order to get any additional books added to collections. And keep in mind that we don’t add books to every collection, but when we do, you can get a great deal on the additional titles. Once a series or collection ships, you’ll need to pre-order additional books separately.

There are a few other collections on the Pre-Pub page which may expand soon. If you’ve had your eye on a collection, you’ll want to lock in your order now to get any additional books at no extra charge!

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Happy Birthday Bible Study Magazine

Today’s guest post is from John Barry, the Editor-in-Chief for Bible Study Magazine.
This morning, we sent Bible Study Magazine Nov–Dec 2009 to the printer. This marks our one-year anniversary. So, if you see Bible Study Magazine around, wish it happy Birthday.
The magazine began with our company president’s vision for a publication solely devoted to Bible study. And today, that vision is a reality. We are all about getting people into the Word with how-to guides, cover stories with leading Bible teachers, and a growing list of odd things in the Bible we explain. Here you can see me going through our very first issue.
Over the last year, we have put lots of hours in and had lots of fun. Running a magazine is intense, but we enjoy it. You should see our pre-press books—for 48 pages, they are nearly 5 inches thick with editorial notes and changes. We think about every word of Bible Study Magazine because we want it to be as good as possible. Want to know what it is like, follow us on Twitter.
We created Bible Study Magazine from scratch—recruiting our own writing staff, fulfilling and managing our own circulation, and creating custom art for every article. Our marketing department took on the challenge (as a digital publisher) of promoting a print magazine.
With Bible Study Magazine, our art team produced more print material than ever. As a graphic artist, this is a whole different ball game than digital. We have embraced what magazines can offer with info-graphics and massive tables that serve as conversational starters and Bible study aids.
It has been an honor to be recognized by Library Journal as one of the top ten magazines launched in 2008, and be featured by people like Mr. Magazine, Publishing Executive and AKGMag.com.
We often joke that Bible Study Magazine is The Atlantic-style writing, in a National Geographic format, all about the Bible. But we have also added the edge of expressing as much as we can visually.
Behind our publication are many people here at Logos and around the world, working to bring you the best content about the Bible and Bible study. Several authors have come to us now to publish their ground-breaking work in archaeology, the historical investigation of the Bible, and theology.
Today, when I look at Bible Study Magazine, I could not be more pleased with the child we have raised. Every parent is allowed to brag about their kids a bit, right?
Oh, and if you are wondering what you should get a magazine for its birthday, you could always order a subscription or renew your current one. That would make today a very happy birthday indeed.

The New International Commentary Is Shipping Next Week

The New International Commentary on the Old and New Testament

The New International Commentary—commonly known as NICOT and NICNT—is one of the most respected commentary series published in the evangelical Protestant tradition. It is thoroughly researched and abreast of modern biblical scholarship, yet at the same time loyal to Scripture as the infallible Word of God.

Many of the volumes in this series have become classic works of evangelical biblical scholarship—in particular F. F. Bruce’s commentary on Acts, Douglas Moo’s commentary on Romans, Gordon Fee’s commentary on 1 Corinthians, Bruce K. Waltke’s commentary on Proverbs, and Leon Morris’s commentary on John. In fact, Christianity Today called Morris’s commentary on John “the best commentary on any book of the Bible by an evangelical in recent decades.”

The New International Commentary—the combined NICOT and NICNT—has been, without a doubt, our best-selling and most popular Pre-Pub. In fact, back when we put it on Pre-Pub a few months ago, we received enough pre-orders in just 13 hours to move the project into production. And the orders haven’t stopped.

In the meantime, we have been hard at work on this massive project. We have converted tens of thousands of pages of print material into electronic text, put in extra hours, and have done everything possible to get the New International Commentary into the hands of our users as fast as possible.

We’re now pleased to announce that we plan to ship the New International Commentary in just a few days. Our Electronic Text Development department is putting the finishing touches on the series this afternoon, and we’ll spend the rest of this week and the early part of next week testing and replicating. We plan to begin processing orders by the end of next week.

What does this mean for you? If you haven’t yet ordered, then this is your last chance to do so and still get the Pre-Pub discount. After we ship, the Pre-Pub price disappears. If you want the lowest price on the New International Commentary, make sure you pre-order now.

With the Logos Bible Software edition, all 23,832 pages of material in all 40 volumes of the New International Commentary will integrate seamlessly with the rest of your digital library—appearing in Passage Guides, search results, and custom reports. That makes this edition even more valuable for research projects or preparing for next Sunday’s sermon.

Remember, if you haven’t ordered yet, you still have one last chance to do so. Place your pre-order now to lock in the lowest price.

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A Happy Birthday to America’s Theologian

Save $50 off the retail price of The Works of Jonathan Edwards (2 Vols.)
- with the coupon code ED306 !

Jonathan Edwards was born to Timothy and Esther Edwards on October 5th, 306 years ago. In the 55 years that followed, he pastored in Northampton, Massachusetts, played a role in the Great Awakening, wrote many highly influential books, papers and sermons, and became president of what would later become Princeton University.

One would find it difficult to over-emphasize the influence that Jonathan Edwards has had in Christian theology, philosophy and practice. The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy called Edwards, “America’s most important and original philosophical theologian.” Perry Miller, founder of the Yale edition of the Works of Jonathan Edwards, described Edwards as the first and greatest American philosopher. In Edward’s works, Perry suggests the reader “discovers an intelligence which, as much as Emerson’s, Melville’s, or Mark Twain’s, is both an index of American society and a comment upon it.”

I personally discovered Edwards in John Piper’s ECPA Gold Medallion winning book God’s Passion for His Glory. In the first half of this life-affecting book, Piper introduced me to Jonathan Edwards and his theological perspective. One could not find a more passionate apologist for Edwards than John Piper. Piper has said, “Jonathan Edwards is in a class by himself in American history, perhaps in the history of Christendom . . .” The second half of God’s Passion for His Glory featured Edward’s essay The End for Which God Created the World in its entirety, along with notes and commentary by Piper. It was not the easiest read by any stretch of the imagination but, like any good work out, I finished it tired and exhilarated. Soon I was devouring everything I could find by and about America’s theologian.

In 1758, Edwards died from the complications of a new and controversial smallpox vaccine. He chose to get the inoculation in order to encourage others to do the same during a smallpox epidemic striking New Jersey at the time. He left behind 11 children and his dear wife Sarah. Beyond his academic legacy, a twentieth century reporter looked into Edward’s 1400 descendants and found they included 13 college presidents, 100 lawyers, 66 doctors, 65 university professors, 2 university deans, and 80 holders of public office, including 3 senators, 3 state governors and Vice President Aaron Burr.

As a celebration of this life well-lived and Edwards’ incredible legacy, we at Logos would like to offer the following special from October 5th through October 12th:

  • The Works of Jonathan Edwards (2 Vols.)
    for $79.95 – with the coupon code ED306 – that’s a $50 savings!
  • Happy birthday, Jonathan Edwards . . . and thank you.

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    The Lighter Side of Discourse Analysis: Segmentation

    For the final installation in the series, "The Lighter Side of Discourse Analysis," Dr. Steve Runge serves up some spicy discourse for you! Here, he highlights the flavors of Segmentation, another concept covered in Discourse Grammar of the Greek New Testament: A Practical Introduction for Teaching and Exegesis.

    If you still have not done so, be sure to serve up your own discourse by placing your Pre-Pub order for the Discourse Grammar.

    Today’s video: Segmentation

    What’s being said about Discourse Grammar of the Greek New Testament:

    “. . . . Though Runge’s Discourse Grammar does not seek to replace traditional approaches to understanding and explicating the grammar and syntax of New Testament Greek, it provides a whole new range of conceptual and analytical tools that complement and supplement the more traditional approaches. . . . ”
    —Dr. J. Ted Blakley, New Testament Studies, University of St. Andrews

    The Discourse Grammar is at the end of production and is getting ready to ship soon, so make sure you place your order before the price goes up!

    Previous blog posts in this series:

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