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Family Fun with Logos

When I travel, I almost always take my laptop with me. Being able to read and study the Bible and Christian literature without having to pack print books is perfect for flying, especially now that many airlines charge extra for your luggage. I’ve heard that some airlines have even considered charging by weight.

But Logos is more than just a Bible study tool. It’s great for fun and games too. I’m sure most of you are aware of the Word Find. You can find it under Tools > Bible Puzzles > Word Find. I’ve used it on a couple of occasions while traveling. It’s not just for kids.

During my last trip to Minnesota to spend Thanksgiving with my wife’s family, I found a couple of new uses for Logos when we were playing games around the kitchen table.

First, I was introduced to a word game called Boggle. The goal is in three minutes to come up with as many words as you can that no one else comes up with—the longer the word the better. As you can imagine, you often have to come up with words that are uncommon. This sometimes involves a bit of guessing, which in turns requires that a dictionary be handy.

I pulled up Merriam-Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary, which comes in most of our base packages, and the Concise Oxford English Dictionary, linked them together, and had fun looking up and learning many new words.

My brother-in-law tried to use a traditional paper dictionary, but I don’t think he even got to the right section of the dictionary before I had looked the word up in two dictionaries. I highly recommend using Logos the next time you need a dictionary for family game time. Less waiting and more time having fun.

Second, another game we played with Logos was one I made up myself. I would read a random verse of Scripture after performing a Bible Speed Search, and the first person to guess the book it was found in would get a point. (You get only one guess until everyone has guessed.) If you could guess the full reference, you’d get a bonus point. This one was a lot of fun, but a little lopsided since my oldest brother-in-law is a pastor and was winning most of them.

These are just a couple of examples that illustrate how Logos is more than just a Bible study tool and can be a great addition to family game time.

How about you? What creative ways have you found to use Logos for more than just Bible study?

Black Friday

parkinglot.jpgLast year was the first time I ever went shopping on Black Friday… it was also likely my last.
Now, I understand that for some people, Black Friday is a tradition. Sure, there are some really good deals out there, but for me, I’d much rather just hop online, price compare in my PJs, and have my products delivered to my door. But, if you’re into getting up at 3:30 in the morning to catch a deal, that’s fine with me. I’ll be sleeping.
For those of you scouring the internet today for deals, I thought I’d take the opportunity to remind you of a couple specials we have going on here at Logos.com.
Word Biblical Commentary Series – Retail $1,199.99 sale price $599.95 (save 50%)
Individual Volumes of the Word Biblical Commentary Series – Retail $49.99 sale price $24.99 (use code WBC) (save 50%)
Advanced Greek Supplement – Retail $411.86 sale price $299.95 (save 27%)
Advanced Hebrew Supplement – Retail $415.89 sale price $259.95 (save 37%)
Original Languages Supplement – Retail $725.33 sale price $514.95 (save 25%)
Ancient Near Eastern Bundle – Retail $1446.80 sale price $693.95 (save 52%)
Hebrew Bible Bundle – Retail $2578.00 sale price $974.95 (save 62%)
Early Judaism Bundle – Retail $2267.59 sale price $524.95 (save 77%)
New Testament Studies Bundle – Retail $5741.40 sale price $1199.95 (save 79%)
Early Church Bundle – Retail $1273.44 sale price $549.95 (save 57%)
Protestant Theology Bundle – Retail $1843.64 sale price $845.95 (save 54%)
Christian Apologetics Bundle – Retail $1437.36 sale price $429.95 (save 70%)
Theological Reference Bundle – Retail $664.87 sale price $359.95 (save 46%)
Scholar’s Reference Bundle – Retail $5480.51 sale price $2389.95 (save 56%).
All pre-orders of a Logos for Mac Base Package are 25% off!
Free Logos for Mac Engine for crossgrade when you spend $250.
And don’t forget all the great deals on pre-pub!

Free Bible Study Magazine – Review Copy

So, you haven’t checked out Bible Study Magazine yet? Well, here’s your chance. For a limited time, we are giving away a free review copy of Bible Study Magazine.
In order to receive your copy, all you have to do is agree to write a review of the magazine anywhere you can, in a church bulletin, ministry newsletter, blog, website, forum, or any other place that you have the opportunity to communicate with people.
So, if you’d like a free review copy, send an email to rburns@logos.com with Bible Study Magazine Review Copy Request as the subject. Also, be sure to include your mailing address so I know where to send it!
Review FAQs:
Do I have to be a blogger or journalist to get a review copy?
No. If you have any outlet for sharing a review, then we’ll send you a copy. So, if you have a newsletter, church bulletin, email list, blog, website, skywriting service, or any other way to communicate with people, then you qualify.
How long does my review have to be?
Length is up to you. Obviously, if you’re putting something in a church bulletin, then you’re not going to have room for a full-out review. In that case, an adequate review might sound something like, “There is a great new magazine you should check out. Bible Study Magazine is an excellent resource to aid in your Bible study. More info can be found at www.BibleStudyMagazine.com.” If you’re a blogger, you have more room to review, so feel free to make your review as long as it needs to be.
Do I have to send you a copy of my review?
Short answer, no. However, we would love to see what you thought of the magazine. If you post your review online, drop me an email or post a comment with a link below so we can check it out. If your review appears in print, you’re free to mail a copy to us. Skywriters, please send pictures!
Logos Bible Software
1313 Commercial St.
Bellingham WA 98225-4307
USA.
*Due to international shipping cost, we have to limit our reviewers to only those in the US. Sincere apologies to our international blog readers.
[Update: Review requests related to this post are no longer being accepted at this time.]

Sale on the Word Biblical Commentary Series

Word Biblical Commentary (WBC 59 Vols.)Through the end of the year, we’re having a sale on the 59-volume Word Biblical Commentary series. This digital set retails for $1,199.99, but is available for a limited time for only $599.95!

Each of these volumes in print has a retail price of $49.99 and sells in the $30-$40 range. If you buy the digital set from us, you’re paying only a tad above $10 per volume! That’s a savings of roughly $1,200-$1,700 when compared to the print cost.

Not only does the Libronix edition of WBC save you a sizable chunk of change, but you also get all of the conveniences of the Libronix Digital Library System, like portability, ease of use, integration with the rest of your digital library, powerful searching, and so much more.

Pastors, scholars, students, and anyone who is serious about Bible study would benefit from this important set—and there’s no better way to make it a part of your library than this.

Update: Don’t want the whole set? Or maybe you just can’t afford it right now? We’re also offering 50% off the retail price on any of the individual volumes with coupon code WBC!

12 New Bundles to Build Your Library!

Scholar's Reference Bundle (140 Vols.)We prepared 12 new bundles for ETS and SBL and wanted to share these specials with you as well. Each of these collections was carefully crafted and offers some really nice savings.

Whether you’re into the original languages, OT studies, NT studies, church history, theology, or apologetics, there’s something here for just about everyone.

For those of you who want to beef up the Greek and Hebrew sections of your digital library, we have three language supplements containing some of our best original language resources:

Many of our other top-selling resources and collections have been conveniently combined into these nine bundles.

Go take a look at what’s included and see if anything here would be a good addition to your Libronix library.

An Important Update to Josephus in Greek

One of the benefits in doing what I do is interacting with different folks about the projects I’m privileged to work on. I get to interact with all sorts of people, many of whom give us valuable feedback on different products and projects. This happened within the past week, and I wanted to share the story.
Logos recently released the Josephus in Greek: Niese Critical Edition with Apparatus. This was a large project and involved a lot of work by a lot of people. It was a great feeling to finally hear that it had shipped because, with the apparatus and the newly-translated prefaces, this puts a lot of stuff that wasn’t easily available into the hands of a lot of folks.
After Josephus in Greek: Niese Critical Edition with Apparatus had been released a few weeks, I was forwarded some feedback from Steve Mason, who is a specialist in the study of Josephus. Some of Steve’s work is available in Logos format, see Josephus and the New Testament and the Flavius Josephus Collection.
Anyway, Steve rightly noted that, while in the Greek text, it wasn’t that easy to see if there were apparatus entries for a particular line of text. The Greek text and apparatus are separate resources that can scroll together, this allows one to scan the whole apparatus to notice if there are trends in omission/addition/correction sources. But it meant that the Greek text itself didn’t provide clues of apparatus entries. He was suggesting that we try to do some sort of linking to make the content easier to access.
In our correspondence, we figured out a solution to the problem. I could insert an apparatus note indicator after a line number if the line had an entry in the apparatus. Yeah, it sounds weird when you write it out. Here’s a picture of the newly-revised resource. Note the dagger (†) after the line number, that is the indicator of apparatus material relevant to the line:

The hover allows one to consult the apparatus content quickly. Note how it displays underneath the Greek line, so you can see which entry applies to which word in the line. If you would like to consult the apparatus further, just click on the indicator (†) instead of hovering on it, and the apparatus itself will be opened to the proper location.
All in all, this should help make the apparatus content even more approachable and useable. True, we should’ve had this type of feature implemented in the first place, but thanks to Steve Mason’s feedback and our conversation, we now have this implemented and available for everyone who purchased the Josephus in Greek: Niese Critical Edition with Apparatus collection.
How do you get it? Just go to our resource FTP site: ftp://ftp.logos.com/lbxbooks and look for the file JOSGK.lbxlls. Download it, put it in your resource folder, and the next time you start Logos it should be there and ready to go. (Vista users may want to consult this page for further info on downloading resources)

Lots of Journals from Logos

We’ve mentioned the Theological Journal Library several times here on the blog. It’s a favorite of many Logos users. But even though it’s a phenomenal deal, not everyone needs or wants all of that content.

If you’ve ever wanted to pick and choose only the journals that interest you, now you can. Visit our new Journals page to purchase individual journals from the Theological Journal Library.

Of course, do your math. It may be a better deal to get the whole bundle than piece together several individual journals. But in our effort to make more things available as individual downloads, we wanted to give you the option to purchase only what you want.

What about new content? The Theological Journal Library is typically updated annually. We plan to add that new content every year or two so you can stay up to date with the latest additions. You’ll be able to upgrade your current collection for a fee that corresponds to the amount of new content for that particular journal.

In addition to all of the journals from the Theological Journal Library, we also have a number of other journals and periodicals listed on our new Journals page. Be sure to give it a look.

Help Us Decide What to Put on Pre-Pub

Our Pre-Pub system let’s you decide which resources make it into production and which ones don’t—or at least which one’s make it sooner than other.

It works quite well for the most part. But for the Pre-Pubs that don’t generate sufficient interest in a reasonable amount of time, perhaps our time could have been better spent working on titles that you want to see turned into Libronix resources.

You get a say in which titles go up on Pre-Pub by submitting your requests to suggest@logos.com and posting them in the suggestions newsgroup. While those suggestions are very helpful, we can’t always license the things you want.

We’re considering another way that you can help us decide which books to Pre-Pub and which ones to pass by or put on the back burner. We’re tentatively calling it Pre-Pre-Pub. :)

Here’s how it will work. Visit the Pre-Pre-Pub page, enter your full name, and then vote on as many of the titles as you’d like. After you’re done, click the submit button at the bottom of the page. (Please vote only once.) After we’ve had enough people respond, we’ll do our best to put your recommendations into action and put up a new list.

At close to 500 titles, our first list might be a bit too large. If you move quickly, you should be able to get through it in roughly 10 minutes. Feel free to skip the ones that don’t interest you. A skip will count as a low vote. To help you navigate the list, we’ve arranged the titles in alphabetical order of the author’s last name.

Thanks for your help! As always, we welcome your feedback on how we can continue to offer you more of the books that you want.

Why Should I Worry about the Septuagint (LXX)?

I recently posted about the progress we’ve made on our The Lexham Greek-English Interlinear Septuagint (LXX), but that post was primarily about our progress. It didn’t really answer the question, “Why should I worry about the Septuagint?”
Books have been written in attempts to answer that question; several are available for Logos Bible Software:

As you can see, much ink has been spilled on the topic of the importance and role of the Septuagint (LXX) in Biblical Studies. I don’t think I’ll answer the question conclusively here, but hopefully I can shed some light on it.
So, why worry about the Septuagint?
Well, for starters, virtually every Bible study method I know of—particularly those geared to students without advanced training in Greek and Hebrew—recommend the consultation of several different Bible translations when examining a passage. Did you know that the Septuagint (LXX) is the oldest translation of the Hebrew Bible that we have? So, when examining a passage in the Old Testament, it can be helpful to examine the LXX as well because it is another translation. The Lexham Greek-English Interlinear Septuagint makes some of the differences between the Hebrew and LXX available through translation differences and also through notes. Used in conjunction with the Lexham Hebrew-English Interlinear Bible, with reputable commentaries on OT books, and with other English translations, The Lexham Greek-English Interlinear Septuagint can be a benefit to your study.
Second, if you’re studying a New Testament passage that quotes the Old Testament, you should check out the source of that quotation. Many times, the NT author is likely using the Septuagint (LXX) and not the Hebrew Scriptures directly. This means examining the fuller context of the quote source is important to understanding how the NT author is using the passage. The Lexham Greek-English Interlinear Septuagint makes this larger context more accessible, particularly to those who may have only focused on the study of Greek in the New Testament.
(An aside, the best and most comprehensive treatment of the NT’s use of the OT is Carson and Beale’s Commentary on the New Testament Use of the Old Testament, edited by D.A. Carson and G.K. Beale, available for Logos Bible Software in the Baker Hermeneutics Collection (14 vols.))
Third, if you’re studying an Old Testament passage that uses an obscure Hebrew word, looking to the Greek of the Septuagint can help in understanding what may have been in the underlying Hebrew text. This in turn can help in coming to a better understanding of the Old Testament text. Consult lexicon articles (such as those in HALOT) which also mention how these more obscure Hebrew words may have been translated in to Greek; use these as a base to track down other citations that use the Greek word in a similar manner.
The same can be said, perhaps to a greater degree, of obscure New Testament words. Examining the Septuagint use of an obscure NT word can be enlightening. Again, use a lexicon (like BDAG) which classifies senses and provides both LXX and NT citations to hunt down LXX citations to follow up on instances like this.
These are only a few reasons why the Septuagint (LXX) should play a role in one’s study of both the Old Testament and the New Testament. So what are you waiting for? Subscribe to the pre-pub, lock in your low price, and reserve your copy of The Lexham Greek-English Interlinear Septuagint today!

What Should I Buy Next?

Scholar's Library: Gold (ND)The best way to get started with Logos Bible Software is to purchase one of our base packages. Not everyone has the same budget or needs, but the bigger packages are definitely the better value. For those who are serious about studying the Bible and are convinced of the value of building a digital library, there’s no better place to start than Scholar’s Gold.

But once you have your base package and are ready for more, what should you buy next?

That’s the question that a new Logos user asked in the newsgroups recently:

I bought the Scholar’s Gold edition. Can you suggest any other good resources I would want to add to it?

I use it mostly for speaking/preaching so I enjoy having lots of good commentaries.

With around 9,000 resources, it’s good to have a little guidance to find out what others consider most useful.

Several longtime Logos users responded with their recommendations. Here are some of the things that they suggested:

I’d concur with most of these recommendations and probably add the Essential IVP Reference Collection and the new Lexham Discourse Greek New Testament Bundle. I’d also point out our Top 10 lists, our Commentary product guide, and our Pre-Pub system.

What would you recommend? What are your top picks for moving beyond a base package?