N. T. Wright Interview: Bible Study, Original Languages, Favorite Books, and More

N. T. Wright is one of today’s most important theologians. His work touches many disciplines—New Testament backgrounds, Pauline scholarship, the doctrine of justification, and much more. Wright has written more than forty books, including the 3-volume Christian Origins and the Question of God Series, the For Everyone commentary series (available from Logos in the N. T. Wright Collection), and many more.

We recently sat down with N. T. Wright to talk about digital tools for Bible study, the importance of original language study, his favorite books and authors, and a whole lot more.

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How to Check Out a Collection—Risk-Free

Commentaries

Have you ever purchased a commentary that you found yourself returning to over and over? You knew it was part of a larger collection, but you also knew purchasing the collection would mean paying for that one commentary again?

I have good news for you.

If you buy a title and soon thereafter decide that you’d like to have the collection instead, we’ll credit the cost of the title toward the collection. This is a great way to test out a series before you invest in the whole thing.
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Proclaim announced with a $25,000 Worship Resource Giveaway

Proclaim Giveaway

This week Logos has introduced our new product called Proclaim, and to celebrate the announcement Proclaim is running a $25,000 Worship Resource Giveaway with over 100 winners.

So what is this new tool and why is it important?

Proclaim is a church presentation software that is going to change the way pastors, worship leaders, and other ministry partners put together a presentation. Not only will pastors be able send information and media directly from Logos 4 to a presentation, but worship leaders and others will be able to access a presentation throughout the week to add songs, backgrounds, and announcements. That’s right, multiple people can work from home or their church—or anywhere with internet access—on the same presentation.

Like Logos 4, Proclaim is a cross platform tool. You access your presentation from any place with an internet connection, from a Mac or PC.

A built-in media store means anyone can add videos or graphics without worrying about file-formats and compatibility, while ensuring the whole team can review selected content before it is presented.

Many churches use online planning tools to plan their service order and communicate with their team. While this has traditionally required worship team members to duplicate efforts inputting the service order and set list into the presentation software, Proclaim will easily import the ‘order of service’ you have already created. Then, the same application your team has used throughout the week to access the online version of the presentation, is now the same application used to run the presentation during the service.

There are some very useful cutting-edge features as well, allowing scriptures, messages, and surveys to be pushed out to the mobile devices of people in your service. For instance, when the scripture slide comes up on a screen, a signal will be sent out to also bring the scripture up on their mobile phones.

We have created Proclaim to be the simplest solution for pastors and worship leaders to present with, and for volunteers to run without a huge learning curve.

The Great Worship Resource Giveaway

To celebrate the announcement of Proclaim, we are running “The $25,000 Great Worship Resource Giveaway”, which will have over a 100 winners! The giveaway features today’s best worship resources and will surely be something your worship team will want to enter. Visit the giveaway and see a video on Proclaim, by clicking the banner above, or by going to http://proclaimonline.com. We would love to know what you think about Proclaim. Post your comments and questions below!

Community Pricing—Deals Too Big to Miss

Community Pricing

A few months ago, Logos shipped Catena Aurea: Commentary on the Four Gospels (8 vols.), a commentary set that started as a Community Pricing Special.

Now when I’m studying the Gospels, I have Catena Aurea open alongside a couple of other modern commentaries. While I love having resources that give me the latest scholarship on a particular verse, I never fail to gain insight when I click over to Catena Aurea and read how Bede, Augustine, and other Church Fathers read Scripture.

When Catena Aurea started out on Community Pricing, Logos users had the opportunity to bid on it, and enough people jumped on the special to lower the price to $14.00. If you missed out on the $14.00 deal, then you probably haven’t been taking advantage of Logos’ Community Pricing Program—where Logos users decide which books we’ll produce, and what price they’ll pay!

Community Pricing offers some amazing deals on classic works in the field of biblical and theological studies. Just scroll through some of the titles, and place a bid on the ones that interest you. Once enough bids have been placed to cover the costs of producing the title, then bidding is closed.

The more interest in a title, the lower its price.

You can help lower the price for a title by encouraging friends to place bids for it, fostering excitement for it in the Logos forums, writing about it on your blog, posting about it on your Facebook, tweeting about it to all your followers, shouting it from the rooftops. . . . Some titles have drawn so much excitement, they’ve sold for $5.00!

Several works are getting close to the finish line, and you don’t want to miss out on these incredible deals:

So head on over to Community Pricing and help decide what gets produced next. With your help, these prices can get even lower!

Today’s guest post is by Robert Campbell, from the Logos Bible Software marketing team.

Richard Young’s Intermediate New Testament Greek

I may be the weird one. But for some reason, I like to have access to grammars that treat the Greek of the New Testament.

The problem is that they are seldom readable. While some grammars may be good for reference (like BDF and Robertson) you would be hard-pressed to sit down and read them through cover to cover. They’re just not meant to work that way.

When I saw Richard Young’s Intermediate New Testament Greek: A Linguistic and Exegetical Approach, however, I had hope. It was a manageable size (308 pages) and actually looked like I could sit and read it (no, really, check the sample scans at the bottom of the product page).

I wasn’t disappointed. I can still remember when I bought the print book (now at least 5 years ago). And I actually read it.

Did you know that Young’s grammar is available for Logos Bible Software? And it isn’t in any of the base packages, not even Portfolio? And that at $29.99, it is one of the more reasonably-priced intermediate Greek grammars that you can get for Logos?

Young’s is a winner for me. Maybe it’ll help you too.

The Second Vatican Council Documents Now Available on Pre-Pub

Vatican IIIt’s impossible to understand Catholicism today without reference to the Second Vatican Council, and—according to Pope Benedict XVI—it’s impossible to understand the Second Vatican Council without placing it in continuity with the entirety of the history and tradition of the Catholic Church.

The sixteen documents produced by the Council between 1962 and 1965 set forth a wide-ranging program of renewal that brought changes to nearly every aspect of the life of the Church. Some of these changes were dramatic and contested, and the resulting tumult has left many, like the Pope, regretting that Vatican II is too often viewed as a rupture with the past, in contradiction to the purpose of the Council Fathers.

Logos is pleased to announce the arrival of the Vatican II Documents to our Pre-Pub program. The Vatican II documents are a crucial addition to our growing library of Catholic products, and the Logos edition will be an excellent tool for establishing the kind of understanding of the Council that Pope Benedict calls for.

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Pillar New Testament Commentary: The First Letter to the Corinthians

Goodwin

I am a huge fan of the Apostle Paul. Not only does his life fascinate me, but I always find myself inspired by his teachings to the early Church. Love one another. Don’t be divisive. Be careful how you live. I can relate to so many of the struggles Christians went through nearly 2,000 years ago, and I’m grateful for Paul’s words that continually point me towards Christ, even in today’s very different times.

That’s why I’m excited about our newest Pillar New Testament Commentary offering. Pillar New Testament Commentary: The First Letter to the Corinthians has been on Pre-Pub for a while now and it’s getting ready to ship!
Noted theologians Brian S. Rosner and Roy E. Ciampa thoroughly unpack this New Testament epistle, basing their exposition on the Greek New Testament. They are deeply committed to a fresh wrestling with the text, using every means at their disposal to “loosen the Bible from its pages” to help readers understand what the text says and how to apply it to life today. Yet, the scholarship does not undermine the accessibility of this volume.

D. A. Carson—professor, theologian, and author/editor of more than 45 resources—wrote the preface to this commentary. In it, he says:

“Those with the responsibility to preach and teach 1 Corinthians will be grateful for this commentary for a long time, while more advanced students of the New Testament will learn some new things and be challenged to think through this epistle with fresh eyes. It is a pleasure to commend this work.”

There’s no doubt about it: the first book of Corinthians is rich with theology and early Church history, and the Pillar New Testament Commentary: The First Letter to the Corinthians does a great job of illuminating the text. Here’s the good news: if you act now, you can still take advantage of our Pre-Pub pricing. It’s not too late to pick this up before it ships.

While you’re at it, if you haven’t already, check out the other Pillar New Testament commentaries available from Logos.

Today’s guest post is by Bethany Olsen, from the Logos Bible Software marketing team.

The Works of Thomas Goodwin on Pre-Pub

Goodwin

Thomas Goodwin’s influence in the 17th century was larger than his immediate name recognition might suggest. His works provide the same kind of practical advice—both profound and readable—that you would expect to find with his more recognized contemporary Richard Baxter.

Goodwin’s Education

Goodwin entered Christ’s College, Cambridge in 1613—at the age of twelve—and received his B.A. in 1616. In 1619 he was transferred to Catherine Hall and, while working on his M.A. degree, was made a lecturer in the Hall. After the death of John Preston in 1628, he became a lecturer at Trinity Church sharing his influence with both Cambridge scholars and the surrounding town. Within four years Goodwin was presented to the vicarage by King Charles I.

The Church of England attempts to purge Puritanism

William Laud, the Bishop of London and close adviser to Charles I, was made Archbishop of Canterbury in 1633. Laud was greatly worried that the growing Puritan movement was a schismatic threat to orthodoxy in the Church of England. He quickly began enforcing laws against ministers who strayed from Book of Common Prayer. He also introduced new church ceremonies and forced ministers to conduct them or face exile, loss of goods, loss of livelihood, and even death. (For great insight into this period check out The History of the Puritans (5 vols.))

Goodwin resigned his position at Trinity Church and left Cambridge in 1634, aligning himself with the Congregationalists. He married in 1638 and was then was forced to flee persecution in Holland.

Goodwin’s return to England

With the inception of the Long Parliament by Charles I, all exiles due to nonconformity were invited to return to their homes. Goodwin returned home to London and ministered for many years at Paved Alley Church, Lime Street, in the parish of St Dunstans-in-the-East.

His distinction and influence continued to rise drawing the attention Oliver Cromwell, to whom he became chaplain, in 1656. As Lord Protector of the Commonwealth of England, Cromwell was responsible for Presbyterianism in Scotland and preserving Protestantism in England. Goodwin remained one of Cromwell’s intimate advisers—even attending to Cromwell at his deathbed.

In 1653 Goodwin, with John Owen, composed an amended Westminster Confession.

Goodwin’s final years

For the last twenty years of his life Goodwin devoted himself to theological study while pastoring the Fetter Lane Independent Church. In a memoir to his son before his death Goodwin said,

“I am going to the three Persons with whom I have had communion: They have taken me, I did not take Them. I shall be changed in the twinkling of an eye; all my lusts and corruptions I shall be rid of, which I could not be here; those croaking toads will fall off in a moment.”

Goodwin’s works available on Pre-Pub

The Works of Thomas Goodwin (12 vols.) is currently featured on Pre-Pub from Logos Bible Software. You can pick up this collection of writings from this great man of depth and conviction—a hearty 6,228 pages—for 70% off the retail price! These kinds of collections not only provide edifying instruction, they offer insight and context into a tumultuous and important time for Christian freedom and expression.

For more great Puritan resources be sure to see:

And don’t miss out on Puritan Sermons 1659–1689 (6 vols.), currently available on Community Pricing.

The Trusted Scholarship of Tabletalk: Now on Pre-Pub

TableTalk

What do R. C. Sproul, D. A. Carson, Jay Adams, Alistair Begg, Michael S. Horton, John Piper, and John MacArthur have in common?

They’re contributors to one of the world’s top Christian magazines: Tabletalk, which is now on Pre-Pub. Each month, Tabletalk’s contributor list is a veritable who’s who of trusted Christian scholarship. For thirty years Ligonier’s Tabletalk has consistently published award winning issues with Christianity’s most trusted thinkers—and now Logos users can have every issue produced between 1989–2010. That’s 265 issues!

Here’s a quick sample of some recent articles by some of today’s high-profile leaders:

  • “Rejoice with Trembling” by John Piper
  • “Knowing Scripture” by R. C. Sproul
  • “Time to (Re)Discover Hebrews” by Sinclair Ferguson
  • “Bearing One Another’s Burdens” by John MacArthur
  • “Expectant Christians” by Iain Campbell
  • “Faith” and “Faithfulness” by D. A. Carson
  • “Stand Firm” by Jay Adams
  • “Justification and Ecumenism” by Michael Horton
  • and many, many more!

And with Logos, you can search every issue by topic, Scripture reference, or by author.

Is Tabletalk a wonderful resource? Absolutely! But don’t just take our word for it, check out these endorsements from actual contributors:

Tabletalk has been a key ingredient in the diet of Christians conscious of their spiritual vitality.—Michael S. Horton

Month by month, Tabletalk represents an oasis in a desert of false spirituality, mindless Christianity, and vapid conviction. Tabletalk represents theological rigor, biblical Christianity, and authentic Christian devotion. It is an antidote to the world of superficial Christianity. Read it and grow.R. Albert Mohler, Jr.

Tabletalk has been a wonderful resource in my own daily walk with the Lord.—Ravi Zacharias

Make sure you get your 265 complete issues of Tabletalk—while it is still on Pre-Pub!

New Interpreter’s Bible and New Interpreter’s Dictionary Now on Pre-Pub!

Like Us

A couple of long-awaited additions—that users have been requesting for years—have recently been included on our Pre-Pub page: The New Interpreter’s Bible (12 vols.) and the New Interpreter’s Dictionary (5 vols.). In the two short weeks since these two collections have hit our Pre-Publication list, they have each gathered nearly half of the interest needed to send them into production. I’m pleased to see such a warm welcome for some of today’s most comprehensive resources for biblical study!

In case these titles are new to you, let me tell you a bit more about each—they are definitely worth a second look:

Deemed “the standard in contemporary biblical studies,” The New Interpreter’s Bible (12 vols.) is composed of a staggering 11,591 pages, penned by top biblical scholars. Not only is this commentary set impressive in girth, its sheer number of illustrations, maps, charts, timelines, and other visual aids add depth of content. Contributors include:

  • Walter Brueggemann
  • Walter C. Kaiser
  • Leander Keck
  • And many others

And, have you ever come across an unknown topic, person, or place in the Bible and wondered “How do I even begin to research this?” The New Interpreter’s Dictionary (5 vols.) provides a fantastic place to gain meticulously researched knowledge on a wide variety of subjects. Let the 900 contributing scholars do the work for you as you seek a better understanding of the Word! Edited by Katharine Doob Sakenfeld, this compendium clarifies biblical terms from A to Z.

Ultimately—whether you are a pastor, Bible study leader, or layperson—you’ll find these two collections to be catalysts for deeper Bible study. As 2011 continues to unfold, let the New Interpreter’s volumes illuminate the Scriptures for you.

If you are one of the many people who have asked for these books in Logos format, now is your chance to pre-order! If you are just in the market for two major reference sets—which are fully-tagged, fully-linked Logos resources—look no further. The The New Interpreter’s Bible (12 vols.) and the New Interpreter’s Dictionary (5 vols.) are premier resources that would be an asset to any resource collection.

Today’s guest post is by Bethany Olsen, from the Logos Bible Software marketing team.