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Seven Great Eschatological Resources

eschatology
Today’s guest post is by Kyle Anderson, from the Logos Bible Software electronic text development team.

“This is the end—for me the beginning of life.”

German pastor-theologian Dietrich Bonhoeffer spoke these famous last words to his fellow prisons at the Flossenbürg concentration camp where he was imprisoned as a conspirator against the Nazi regime.

For Bonhoeffer, and many of us, the end of our earthly life is the beginning of an even greater journey: eternal life with God. But for most of us, figuring out what this means exactly is a bit trickier. To further complicate matters, Christian eschatology (the systematic study of the Last Things) is often full of rabbit trails, speculation, and esoteric biblical imagery. Finally, there are so many different biblically supported positions concerning Eschatology; it’s difficult to know where to even begin.

Hopefully this list will be a nice primer on resources that might aid you in your Biblical studies of eschatology.

  • George Ladd—The Last Things: An Eschatology for Layman

    The late Fuller Theological Seminary professor is best known for articulating the “now/not yet” nature of the Kingdom of God. God’s kingdom has been fulfilled within history in Jesus Christ but awaits its consummation at the end of history. In this volume, Ladd guides us through the Biblical witness concerning the End Times.

  • Loraine Boettner—The Millennium

    In this volume, Reformed thinker Loraine Boettner examines the relative merits, weaknesses, and Biblical support for the three three major positions concerning the Second Coming of Christ and the future of God’s Kingdom: amillenialism, premillenialism, and Boettner’s preferred position: postmillennialism.

  • Thomas Oden—Systematic Theology (3 vol.)

    Life in the Spirit, the third volume of Methodist theologian Oden’s towering systematic draws from the deep cistern classical Christianity in examining the work of the Holy Spirit in the life of the Church universal and the individual believer. Concluding with a discussion on eschatology, the Last Things are far from a theological addendum but instead includes both “the end and meaning of the whole of human history” (p. 371).

  • Thomas Aquinas—Summa Theologica

  • Thomas Aquinas—Catena Auraea: Commentary on the Four Gospels

    Eschatology as a discipline didn’t begin yesterday. We have much to learn from the past. Summa Theologica is an outstanding source for any topic, but is especially important for providing much of the basis for Roman Catholic thought over the last 700 years. As a compilation of Patristic commentary on the Gospels, Catena Auraea is unique in that it affords you to get a sneak peak on how the Church has historically interpreted the Gospel passages concerning the End Times.

  • Dictionary of Biblical Prophecy and End Times

    As a dictionary, J. Daniel Hays, J. Scott Duvall, and C. Marvin Pate have edited a simple but thorough tool that helps you both identify the terms and issues surrounding prophecy in the Bible. As you study those often obtuse passages concerning the Last Things, this will be a resource your reach for time and time again.

  • The Future as God’s Gift: Explorations in Christian Eschatology

    Not for beginnings, but as a collection of scholarly essays concerning related topics such as the nature of time, the practice of hope, and the future of creation you’ll have food for thought on the ways eschatology might shape our Christian faith and practice in the 21st century.

It’d be a Shame to Waste All That Preparation

You spend hours each week preparing for your sermon or lessons, and you probably have more to communicate now than ever before. We’ve provided the tools you need to take your preparation to the next level, now it’s time to take your presentation to the next level too.

For nearly two decades we at Logos have digitized print books filled with biblical information. We have also developed state of the art search and retrieval technology enabling you to mine these electronic resources for those scriptural insights.

Using Logos Bible Software you can effectively exegete and study any passage in the Bible. Having thoroughly investigated the biblical text, you probably have page after page of notes, quotes, and anecdotes. If you’re a preacher, teacher, or Bible study leader you now have to organize and present that material so your listeners can understand and apply the passage.

It is great to have high-end professional-level tools like Logos Bible Software to prepare your sermon, but until now, you’ve been on your own to know how to preach it. We felt the next step was to provide you with professional-level presentation training from one of the most gifted and professional presenters we have ever met.

Toward that end, we have worked with Morris Proctor, of MPSeminars to develop “The I-Beam of Message Building” video training for our users.

As a Logos user you perhaps know Morris as the instructor at Camp Logos, the author of training manuals, and the producer of video tutorials. First and foremost, though, he is a pastor and expository preacher. Through almost 30 years of preaching and teaching God’s word, Morris has honed his communication skills. People who hear him preach are inspired by his insights into Scripture, his passionate presentation, and his down-to-earth communication style.

Because of the encouragement from others, Morris decided to organize and record his personal sermon preparation process into the I-Beam seminar. Using the analogy of a construction I-Beam, Morris shows you how to fulfill what he believes to be the two great principles of biblical preaching or teaching:

  • Be Faithful to the Text
  • Be Functional for the Times

After explaining these foundational principles, Morris then thoroughly—yet practically—walks you through six steps of preparing an expository message:

  • Interpretation
  • Incompletion
  • Impression
  • Implication
  • Intention
  • Indentation

After completing these six steps you will have a skeleton of a sermon or lesson. Morris then carefully shows you how to add flesh to the bones. He leaves no stone unturned as he teaches you, among other things, how to begin your message with an attention-getting, need-revealing introduction, powerfully state your main points, and smoothly transition from one segment of the message to the next. Wrapping it all up, he instructs you to boldly and practically end the message as you call for action from your listeners.

The I-Beam of Message Building is a video training course to watch on your TV. It works on a standard DVD player (or DVD software on your computer). It does not require Logos Bible Software. It actually picks up where Logos Bible study ends. If you teach or preach, you will immediately profit from this resource. The I-Beam program is like a video textbook on the art of preaching and teaching biblical truths.

You will learn from a master teacher as you watch these professionally produced videos and follow along in the I-Beam manual that is included with the set. Using the hyperlinked menus and the back / forward buttons, you can jump to or review any section you desire.

I-Beam picks up where Logos Bible study leaves off. It shows you how to organize your research into sermons or lessons that are both biblical in content and applicable in presentation.

If you are a preacher, teacher, or Bible study leader the I-Beam is for you. Whether you are a seasoned communicator or a beginning presenter, the I-Beam provides foundational principles and practical advice for your proclamation of God’s Word.

To watch the video demo and learn more, see The I-Beam of Message Building page.

Introducing the SBL Greek New Testament

Logos Bible Software has partnered with the Society of Biblical Literature (SBL) to produce a new, critically edited edition of the Greek New Testament called The Greek New Testament: SBL Edition, abbreviated as SBLGNT and also known as the SBL Greek New Testament.
The SBLGNT is edited by Michael W. Holmes, already well known for his edition and translation of the Apostolic Fathers. For the SBLGNT, he utilized a wide range of printed editions of the Greek New Testament, all the major critical apparatuses, in addition to consulting the latest technical resources and manuscript discoveries as he established the text. The result is a critically edited text that differs from the NA/UBS text in more than 540 variation units.
I’ve had the privilege of being involved since the get-go on this, and it has been a load of fun.
Before the details, here are the basics:
1. It’s Free From Logos
The SBLGNT is available via SBLGNT.com. You can freely unlock the SBLGNT and its apparatus (!) for Logos Bible Software. The Logos version is fully morphologically tagged, with Louw-Nida reference annotation. The license is generous, and is fairly similar to that of the Lexham English Bible. At present, you can get plain text or XML files for your own personal use.Note for Mac Users: There is an issue with Logos 4.0 for the Mac and the SBLGNT; this issue is known and we will make a service release of Logos 4 Mac available in the next few days to fix the problem. You can still use the resource, the problem is with navigation by book/chapter/verse.
2. Available in Print
The SBLGNT will be published in print by the SBL. Copies will be available at the Annual Meeting of the SBL in Atlanta this November and subsequently can be purchased from the SBL web site. Curious to how it will look? Check out this sample of John 1:1–4:15. PDF will be available for download in late November or early December.
3. Available on the iPhone, iPad, and Biblia.com
The SBLGNT and its apparatus are or will shortly be available on Biblia.com and also for the Logos iPhone, iPod and iPad app.

4. Revised LEB
Hall Harris has revised and updated the Lexham English Bible (LEB) New Testament to be a translation of the SBLGNT. If you are a Logos user, and you have the LEB (which is also freely available if you don’t have it yet), then the update will be available to you as well. If you use Logos 4, the update will come automatically if it hasn’t already. If you have a Logos 4 package that includes a reverse interlinear to the LEB, that will be updated (to reflect the SBLGNT) as well. We hope for this update to be released by the end of this week.
5. Free PDF
To make the textual relationship between the SBLGNT and the LEB as transparent as possible for even those who are not Logos users, we’ve produced a PDF version of the Lexham English Bible English-Greek Reverse Interlinear New Testament. Using this material, you can see how different words/clauses/phrases of the SBLGNT were translated by the LEB, in context. This is available on the SBLGNT Download page and scroll down to find it.
Now, the details:
You can head to the SBLGNT web site for more detail. Read the Preface and the Introduction to learn more about why and how the SBLGNT was created. And it’s sure to be discussed on the Logos forums, so check there too.
And, if you’re a Logos user, there will be even more SBLGNT-related goodness coming in the next week.
The bottom line:
We’re really excited about this new edition of the Greek New Testament. We think it will be useful not only in the context of Logos Bible Software, but also for those studying, analyzing and working with the text of the Greek New Testament on a regular basis.

Get Your Bible Study Tip Published

Torrence

Today’s guest post is from Rebecca Kruyswijk, the Associate Editor of Bible Study Magazine.

If you subscribe to Bible Study Magazine, you may have come across a new section in the Nov-Dec ‘10 issue: Bible Study Tips. In this issue, we’re publishing Bible study tips from readers like you.

The vision of Bible Study Magazine is to get people into the Word. We’re not looking for a niche readership. We believe that, given the right tools and methods for Bible study, anyone can be a theologian. This has been our mission since Bible Study Magazine went to press two years ago, and it’s still our goal today. (As a side note, it is our birthday and we do accept cake donations.)

It’s not just the experts that have something valuable to say about Bible study. We’re looking for Bible study tips from anyone who is passionate about studying the Word. That’s where you come in. Contribute a Bible study tip. Join the conversation, and perhaps someone might benefit from your perspective.

How can you weigh in for future issues? It’s simple. Go to our Facebook page and “like” us—if you haven’t already. Then post your Bible study tips on our wall. Tips can be short or long, general or specific.

James Hamrick contributed this tip to the Nov-Dec ’10 issue:

“Write down every verb used for God. The God of Genesis is one who sees, learns, walks, speaks and maybe even wrestles.”

And RC Clyde added this:

“Keep it simple: 1) Get a Bible you can understand. 2) Pray to God before you start. 3) Let God show you His Word; don’t draw your own answer. 4) Find a good commentary.”

Take a moment to consider your own Bible study methods, and then share them with the rest of the Bible Study Magazine community. Join the conversation and help someone else get into the Word.

Improving Your Bible Study with Dictionaries

TorrenceToday’s guest post is by Kyle Anderson, from the Logos Bible Software electronic text development team.

“Don’t let commentaries rob you of the joy of discovery!”

This little bit of advice from my New Testament professor has really stuck with me, and shaped the way I study the Bible. Rather than simply reaching for one of hundreds of great commentaries out there, I now look for another way. It’s not that my professor was against commentaries and forbade us from using them. Far from it. He simply recognized that studying the Bible should be a thrilling adventure full of twists, turns, detours, and discovery. For the student of Scripture, jumping to a commentary was akin to skipping to the final chapter of a novel: you get the gist of what happened, but you miss out in the process. Instead, the commentary should be a conversation partner that helps balance your own discoveries with someone more experienced than you.

This didn’t mean you could simply open a Bible, read a passage once, and expect to understand it completely. There are occasional obscurities and difficulties that need assistance to resolve before we can reach that place of discovery. To aid us in our discovery, he recommended a whole host of tools to put in our box: lexicons, grammars, apparatuses, and my favorite of the bunch—dictionaries.

Continue Reading…

10 Great Anglican Resources on Pre-Pub

Anglican
Today’s guest post is by Elliot Ritzema, from the Logos Bible Software Design & Editorial team.

With around 400 resources currently on the Pre-Pub page, it can be hard to find a path through all the options to what really may interest you. For example, there are several collections with titles like “The Whole/Complete/Exhaustive/Collected Works of _____.” Some of these people are widely read and recognized. Others you may recognize but don’t know much about. Still others may be names that you’ve never heard of.

To keep from being overwhelmed by all the choices, I like to group resources by something they have in common. For those of you who are Anglican, or interested in Anglican history and theology, here are ten sets currently gathering interest or under development. Here they are, arranged chronologically:

  1. Thomas Cranmer Collection
  2. Cranmer (1489-1556) was a leader of the English Reformation and was Archbishop of Canterbury when the Church of England separated from the Catholic Church. He is responsible for compiling and writing the Book of Common Prayer.

  3. The Works of that Learned and Judicious Divine, Mr. Richard Hooker
  4. Hooker’s (1554-1600) writings, especially Of the Laws of Ecclesiastical Polity (in which he tried to find a middle way between Catholicism and Puritanism) were very influential on later Anglicanism as well as political theory.

  5. The Whole Works of the Rev. John Lightfoot
  6. Lightfoot (1602-1675) was a clergyman and rabbinical scholar who attended the Westminster Assembly. This collection includes his account of the first two years of the assembly, among other writings. He is also the author of A Commentary on the New Testament from the Talmud and Hebraica.

  7. The Works of George Whitefield
  8. Whitefield (1714-1770) was an evangelist who often paid little attention to sectarian distinctions, but I’ve included him here because he was a lifelong member of the Church of England. This collection includes many of his letters and sermons, as well as five biographical works.

  9. The Works of Augustus M. Toplady
  10. He is best known as the writer of the hymn “Rock of Ages.” In early years Toplady (1740-1778) was influenced by John Wesley, but later he became a convinced (and often polemical) Calvinist.

  11. A Practical View of Christianity
  12. William Wilberforce (1759-1833) is famous for his efforts to abolish the slave trade in the British Empire, but he also worked to reform British morality as a whole by encouraging people to adopt “serious religion.” He wrote this book to that end, as is shown by its full title: A Practical View of the Prevailing Religious System of Professed Christians in the Higher and Middle Classes in this Country, Contrasted with Real Christianity. It was a bestseller.

  13. Collected Works of John Henry Newman
  14. He famously converted to Catholicism in mid-life (and was recently beatified by the Catholic Church), but Newman (1801-1890) began his public career as an Anglican active in the Oxford Movement. This collection of his writings should be of interest not only to both Catholics and Anglicans, but also those interested in 19th-century English history and lovers of great writing. Excerpts from Newman’s Apologia Pro Vita Sua and The Idea of a University, among other works, have appeared in collections like the Norton Anthology of English Literature.

  15. J.C. Ryle Collection
  16. Ryle (1816-1900) was bishop of Liverpool from 1880 until his death. He was a leader of the evangelical wing of the Church of England, and his writings were influenced by Puritan theology. In turn, his book Holiness: Its Nature, Hindrances, Difficulties and Roots influenced a young J.I. Packer.

  17. Joseph Barber Lightfoot Collection
  18. Not to be confused with John Lightfoot, J.B. Lightfoot (1828-1889) was bishop of Durham from 1879 until his death. He is known today primarily as a New Testament and patristic scholar. This collection includes lecture notes, commentary manuscripts and sermons which are not included in his other books that are published by Logos.

  19. Edwin Hatch Collection
  20. Hatch (1835-1889) was a Greek scholar and church historian. His Essays in Biblical Greek is shipping next month. This collection focuses on his historical writing, and includes his controversial The Influence of Greek Ideas and Usages Upon the Christian Church.

    Finally, I will call your attention to a collection that does not deal exclusively with Anglicanism:

  21. Christianity in the British Isles Collection (6 vols)
  22. This collection contains some fantastic and informative resources like Anglicanism and the Christian Church: Theological Resources in Historical Perspective by Paul Avis and The Free Church of England: Introduction to an Anglican Tradition by John Fenwick.

If I haven’t mentioned your favorite Anglican resource on Pre-Pub, feel free to mention them in a comment below.

Introducing the Foundations of Theology Bundle

Bundle

Have you been looking for a strong collection of theology books to add to your digital library? Or perhaps you have been looking for a good entry level bundle to help you develop your theological resources. Well, look no further. The new Foundations of Theology Bundle is not only a great place to begin growing your theological collection, it is a handpicked selection of formidable titles that will add value to your Logos 4 resources.

The Foundations of Theology Bundle compiles the works of heavyweights from across the theological spectrum. The result is a trustworthy collection of biblically rich materials to enrich your study and understanding.

The titles included in the 15 volume Foundations of Theology Bundle include:

Berkhof’s Systematic Theology

One of the most important and widely-used systematic theologies since its release in 1938, Berkhof’s Systematic Theology articulates Reformed theology in the traditions of Abraham Kuyper and Herman Bavinck.

Chafer’s Systematic Theology (8 Vols.)

This has been a seminal resource since its release in 1948. Written by Lewis Sperry Chafer, the founding president of Dallas Theological Seminary and long-time editor of Bibliotheca Sacra, this was the first dispensational, premillenial systematic theology ever published.

Ryrie’s Basic Theology

Written with a clear understanding of the Scriptures and an unpretentious style, Charles Ryrie’s classic Basic Theology is a standard text for many Bible students and pastors. In fact, Ryrie’s theology is required reading for a variety of seminary courses.

Foundations of the Christian Faith by James Montgomery Boice

In one systematic volume, James Boice provides a readable overview of Christian theology. Whether teacher or student, pastor or layperson, Foundations of the Christian Faith will provide a rich source of Scriptural knowledge, covering all the major doctrines of Christianity. Boice maintains a remarkable practicality and thoroughness that have made this a standard reference and text for over two decades.

Systematic Theology (4 vols.) by Norman Geisler

Theologian and apologist Norman Geisler has been one of the most prolific and influential leaders in the area of evangelical apologetics. For over forty years he has studied and defended the faith as an author and as an internationally known speaker and debater. He brings vast experience to his magnum opus, the four volumes of Systematic Theology.

These books—purchased separately—would cost nearly $450.00, but the Foundations of Theology Bundle sells them for $299.95. That’s a savings of about $150.00!

If you are just beginning to compile your theological library, or even if you want to add some incredible resources to your deep theological collection, you can’t go wrong with the Foundations of Theology Bundle.

A Collection of 14 Books on How to be Dogmatic?!?

signin

No, Berkouwer’s Studies in Dogmatics is not actually about how to be dogmatic (that is, how to present your opinions as unchallengeable or the final word). In the field of theology, dogmatic refers to a study of doctrine. Studies in Dogmatics is a 14 volume work on some of the most important doctrine in church history.

Walter Elwell, Professor Emeritus of Bible and Theology at Wheaton College, had this to say about Berkouwer’s Studies in Dogmatics: “[It is] perhaps the most monumental evangelical theological project of [the last] century. Written in almost conversational style, these volumes deal with topics of theological concern, such as divine election, faith and sanctification, Holy Scripture, and the church, rather than presenting a tightly argued system of thought. . . . Perhaps the outstanding Reformed theologian of this generation, Berkouwer never wavered from his commitment to the principles of Scripture, faith, and grace alone” (Evangelical Dictionary of Theology, pg. 151).

Want to see what you can do with Studies in Dogmatics in Logos Bible Software? Check out my video below.

Interested in a concise book on Reformed doctrine? Pick up Summary of Christian Doctrine by Louis Berkhof for $18. (Both Berkouwer and Louis Berkhof were influenced by Abraham Kuyper and Herman Bavinck.)

Last Chance Pre-Pub Deals: 100+ Books Shipping Soon!

We have been ramping up our production lines, and we’re getting ready to ship several collections totaling more than a hundred books in the next couple weeks. The good news for you is that this provides you with one last chance to get some quality books at incredible prices. Once these books ship, the Pre-Pub prices will disappear.

Pillar New Testament Commentary: The Letter to the Hebrews

Here are some of the highlights:

Pillar New Testament Commentary: The Letter to the Hebrews

This commentary is the newest volume in the Pillar New Testament Commentary. The commentary is neither unduly technical nor unhelpfully brief. D. A. Carson wrote that “it would be difficult to find a more helpful guide [to Hebrews] than Peter O’Brien or a guide better endowed with his combination of competence and genial wisdom.” If you’re planning a sermon series or teaching a class on Hebrews, you’ll definitely want to pick up O’Brien’s new commentary.

This commentary will sell for $50.00 after it ships, but between now and October 14 you can get it for $29.95 on Pre-Pub.

The Practical Works of the Rev. Richard Baxter (23 Vols.)

Anchor Yale Bible: Nahum

In one of the newest volumes in the Anchor Yale Bible, Duane Christensen offers a detailed analysis of the Hebrew text, and explores the literary structure and the poetry of the book. It contains original translations, a detailed book outline, verse-by-verse commentary, analysis of interpretive approaches, and lots of introductory material.

The list price for Anchor Yale Bible: Nahum is $65.00, but for a little while longer you can get it on Pre-Pub for $49.95.

The Practical Works of the Rev. Richard Baxter (23 Vols.)

The Practical Works of the Rev. Richard Baxter (23 Vols.) contains the treatises, sermons, and works of one of Puritan England’s most prolific writers and most influential preachers.

http://www.logos.com/products/prepub/details/4218

Richard Baxter preached theological unity during a century of schism, and advocated mutual respect within the church during a period of intense religious warfare. He wrote with the conviction that theology should always be connected with both Christian ethics and human experience. He offers timeless on practical Christian matters, such as worship, devotions, parenting, education, relationships, and more. If you’re interested in the Puritans or in the history of Reformed theology in general, this collection is a must-have.

The sale price will be $349.95 after it ships, but for a few more weeks you can get it for $179.95.

That’s just the tip of the iceberg. There are a ton of additional books shipping in the next few weeks. When these books ship, the Pre-Pub prices disappear. Make sure you get in on these deals while they’re still available! Head on over to the Pre-Pub page to see what else is shipping soon!

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Daniel Wallace Writes the Foreword to Discourse Grammar

discoursegrammar

Today’s guest post is from Michael Aubrey, on the marketing team.

The name Daniel Wallace is well-known to today’s Greek students. He’s been teaching at Dallas Theological Seminary for years. His invaluable intermediate grammar, Greek Grammar Beyond the Basics, is used in Bible colleges and seminaries all over the world and in more than two thirds of the schools teaching New Testament Greek in the United States. He’s the senior New Testament editor of the NET Bible and the founder of The Center for the Study of New Testament Manuscripts.

Because of Dr. Wallace’s standing in schools and seminaries and his own contributions to Greek grammar, we were so excited when it was confirmed that he would write the foreword to Steve Runge’s Discourse Grammar of the Greek New Testament! Steve had originally written the Discourse Grammar in order to fill a gap. In Wallace’s own preface to Greek Grammar Beyond the Basics, he had written:

“Contrary to the current trend, this work has no chapter on discourse analysis. . . . DA is too significant a topic to receive merely a token treatment, appended as it were to the end of a book on grammar. It deserves its own full-blown discussion, such as can be found in the works of Cotterell and Turner, D. A. Black, and others.”

And yet, those who have picked up Cotterell and Turner’s Linguistics and Biblical Interpretation or D. A. Black’s Linguistics and New Testament Interpretation: Essays on Discourse Analysis know that the authors of these important volumes never intend their work to function as a comprehensive introduction to discourse grammar. The latter is a collection of high quality, but technical essays on specific topics in discourse analysis (which Steve refers to at several points) and the former has as its central focus issues related to hermeneutics and interpretation rather than grammar.” Steve Runge’s Discourse Grammar complements both of these important books by filling in the gap between grammar and interpretation (Cotterell and Turner’s volume) and between traditional grammar and advanced discourse studies (D. A. Black’s book).

And with these realities in mind, we were excited to see these words in Dr. Wallace’s foreword:

This volume is long overdue. Students of the New Testament have been barraged for decades with linguists touting the value of discourse analysis, but few works have demonstrated its importance for exegesis. . . . What Runge has done is to focus on the exegetical significance of discourse grammar for Neutestamenters. He has gathered together several strands of linguistic insights (he calls his approach ‘cross-linguistic’ and ‘function-based’) that are often treated in isolation and sometimes without much more than lip service for exegesis. In short, Runge has made discourse analysis accessible, systematic, comprehensive, and meaningful to students of the New Testament. His presentation is clear, straightforward, and well researched. . . . I have learned a great deal from this volume and will continue to do so for many years. To students of the New Testament, I say, “The time has come. Tolle lege!

Check out Steve’s Discourse Grammar of the Greek New Testament for yourself, you’ll be glad that you did!