Archive - Products RSS Feed

Cranfield on Romans

Cranfield on Romans and other New Testament EssaysC.E.B. Cranfield is perhaps best known for his two-volume commentary on Romans, which is part of the International Critical Commentary series (ICC, see here and here). And this is rightly so, his commentary is magesterial. But a writer can only handle so many issues in a commentary volume. Many times the rabbit trails run longer than the space one has available.
Did you know that Cranfield also published a collection of essays called On Romans and Other New Testament Essays? While this title is in the Portfolio (LE) collection of Logos Bible Software, chances are — particularly if you’re new to Logos Bible Software in the past few years — you didn’t even know it was available.
In On Romans Cranfield has more of a chance to dig into things that just don’t fit in the framework of a commentary. The table of contents has some details:

  1. ‘The Works of the Law’ in the Epistle to the Romans
  2. A Note on Romans 5:20-21
  3. Romans 6:1-14 Revisited
  4. Sanctification as Freedom: Paul’s Teaching on Sanctification, with special reference to the Epistle to the Romans
  5. Some Comments on Professor J.D.G. Dunn’s Christology in the Making with special reference to the evidence of the Epistle to the Romans
  6. Preaching on Romans
  7. On the Πιστις Χριστου (Pistis Christou) Question
  8. Giving a Dog a Bad Name: A note on H. Räisänen’s Paul and the Law
  9. Has the Old Testament Law a Place in the Christian Life? A response to Professor Westerholm
  10. Who Are Christ’s Brothers? (Matthew 25:40)
  11. The Resurrection of Jesus Christ
  12. Some Reflections on the Subject of the Virgin Birth
  13. A Response to Professor Richard B. Hays’ The Moral Vision of the New Testament

As you can see, you also get peeks at Cranfield’s take on areas outside of Romans, and even comments on some on-going discussions like the πιστις Χριστου debate. This is excellent stuff. Printed reviews of On Romans are positively glowing (see the product page for some excerpts). Maybe it’s time to add On Romans to your library too.

How to Celebrate John Calvin’s 501st Birthday

Calvin 500 Collection (108 Vols.)

John Calvin is one of the church’s greatest theologians, and Calvinism one of the Western world’s most influential intellectual movements. Calvin was a theologian, pastor, biblical exegete, and tireless apologist for Reformed Christianity. His theological works, biblical commentaries, tracts, treatises, and letters helped establish the Reformation as a legitimate and thriving religious movement throughout Europe and the world.

No theologian has been acclaimed or assailed as much as Calvin. Calvinism has spawned movements and sparked controversy throughout the centuries. Wars have been fought both to defend and destroy it, and its later proponents began political and theological revolutions in Western Europe and America. The breadth and depth of the engagement with Calvin’s works since they first appeared four centuries ago—and their continuous publication since then—testifies to Calvin’s importance and lasting value for the church today. Thinking Christians from the twenty-first century who ignore Calvin’s writings do so at their own peril.

To celebrate Calvin’s birthday and his importance for the church today, we launched the Calvin 500 Collection—a massive project to convert 108 books by or about Calvin to our format. The Calvin 500 Collection includes:

  • 3 English translations of Calvin’s Institutes—including the rare Thomas Norton translation
  • Latin and French editions of Calvin’s Institutes
  • Complete set of Calvin’s commentaries
  • Four volumes of Calvin’s letters and correspondence
  • Dozens of tracts and theological treatises written by Calvin
  • Ten biographies of Calvin’s life and work
  • 31 volumes of secondary literature on the history and influence of Calvinism

We hoped to complete the project during 2009 (before Calvin turned 501), but it didn’t happen. Some of the texts, like the Norton translation of the Institutes—the first in the English language—took longer than we planned. We also ran into some problems with the commentaries which needed some special attention.

But the biggest delay happened when we launched Logos 4 in November. In the weeks before the launch, all efforts were devoted to making sure it happened as smoothly as possible—finishing all new books for the expanded Logos 4 base packages, working with our beta testers, building the new Logos iPhone app, training our customer service department and sales teams, and hundreds (thousands?) of other behind-the-scenes projects.

We’ve been busy since the release, too. We’ve been reading the emails you’ve sent us, talking to you on the phone, closely watching the Community Forums, listening to customer feedback, creating training videos and support pages, and doing everything we can to make Logos 4 even better. Since the launch, we’ve released a major update to Logos 4, with tons of new features. We’ve been updating the Mac version just about every week. And we just came out with a brand new update to the Logos iPhone app which now allows offline reading on your iPod Touch or on the iPhone when you’re in an airplane. Oh, and did we mention there are 1,000 more books available for reading on your iPhone than there were a month ago? These are just a handful of great reasons to upgrade today—and until the end of next week, you can still get 25% off when you upgrade to Logos 4.

So you can see why the Calvin 500 Collection wasn’t finished by the end of 2009.

Fortunately, even though it’s 2010 now, John Calvin is still 500 years old. He doesn’t turn 501 years old until July 10, 2010, and by then, you’ll be using Logos Bible Software to read all of Calvin’s commentaries, books, and theological works.

In fact, you’ll be reading the new Calvin books much sooner than July. We are very, very close to finishing the project. Although we are not quite ready to project a ship date, we can promise that it will be soon.

One last thing, the Pre-Pub price for the Calvin 500 Collection will go up on Friday, which means you still have four more days to lock your order in the current price. If you’re thinking of pre-ordering, do it now before the price goes up.

Pre-Pubs Shipping Soon!

Tyndale Commentaries CD-ROM (49 Vols.)

Our number one priority for the past couple months has been the launch of Logos 4 and keeping our customers happy. We’ve devoted our entire company to ensuring that this happens.

Now that Logos 4 is launched, our electronic text department has returned to some other projects. They are wrapping up several Pre-Pub books and collections, and many are projected to ship in the next few weeks.

You still have a little more time to pick up some great books at a steep discount. Don’t pass up these deals!

Speaking of discounts, don’t miss out on the Logos 4 introductory discounts. The introductory offer expires soon, so don’t wait!

Morris, How Do I…?

Logos 4 Bible Software Training Manual: Volume 1

Monday’s posts are usually from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Today we introduce the Logos 4 Bible Software Training Manual: Volume 1, by mp|Seminars. Morris has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos training seminars.

The all-new Logos 4 Bible Software Training Manual: Volume 1 is here, complete with step-by-step instructions and helpful screenshots to guide you visually!

This 27-section manual, the most thorough manual to date, covers everything you need to become familiar with the new Logos Bible Software 4. Morris starts by giving you an overview of the Logos 4 desktop to familiarize you with the User Interface. From there, he provides an introduction to the Home Page and Home Page Bible Study before diving into sections on the Passage Guide, the Exegetical Guide, the Bible Study Guide and so much more.

Like attending Camp Logos, Morris provides plenty of tips and reminders which will allow your Bible study to become more productive as you learn timesaving tips and keyboard shortcuts, more focused as you learn how to access the specific Bibles, commentaries, and resources pertaining to your areas of interest, and more fruitful as you spend more time studying and less time searching for study material.

After you order your copy of the Logos 4 Bible Software Training Manual: Volume 1, round out your training by watching our training videos, and of course, check the Camp Logos Calendar for the next event near you.

Göttingen Septuagint (LXX), Now With Provisional Morphology

In November of 2010, we released the introductory material, text and apparatuses of the highly-acclaimed Göttingen Septuagint.
We’d planned on releasing the fully morphologically analyzed text, but weren’t able to release it at that time. Due to the importance of the apparatus material, we decided it was worth shipping the product without the morphological analysis, and updating later as the analysis became available. As I mentioned in a previous post about the Lexham LXX Interlinear, the Septuagint is big. The material available for Göttingen is more than three times the size of the New Testament.
Since then, we’ve had some breakthroughs and are thrilled to be able to release a provisional edition of the Göttingen Septuagint with morphological analysis. Nearly 99% of the words in the text are analyzed, with morphology and lemma information; the vast majority of those have English gloss information as well. If you’re a Logos 4 user and have already purchased the Göttingen Septuagint, then the updates have likely already downloaded for you.
What do you mean by “Provisional”?
That’s a good question. What we mean by “provisional” is that we’ve done a load of analysis and comparison with our existing Septuagint morphology (used in the Lexham LXX Interlinear and also in the Septuagint with Logos Morphology) and where we could make reliable assumptions about agreements between the two texts, we incorporated the agreeing morphology and lemma information. This is where the “nearly 99%” number comes from. For areas that did not reliably agree, we used other data sets to prepopulate morphology and lemma information; these will be reviewed and corrected over the next months. As individual volumes are reviewed, updates of those volumes will be made available to Logos users who have already purchased Göttingen.
We plan to start the review process in early 2011, but since the coverage was much greater than we’d anticipated, it makes sense to release the provisional edition so that people who already have purchased the Göttingen Septuagint can begin to use the morphology. You know, use features like:

  • Morphological Searching
  • Lemma-based KeyLinking
  • Morphological Visual Filters
  • Sympathetic Highlighting

While some portions will be reviewed and corrected during this process, the vast majority of the analysis is reliable as it presently stands. Some of the alternate resources (the “alpha” text of Esther and the alternate text of Habakkuk 3) have no analogue in other LXX editions, so the tagging on these is in a much more provisional state than the rest of the material.
Note for Mac Users: This is a 4.2 only update. Mac users on 4.0b will continue to use the older versions of the resources. Mac users on 4.2 beta will be able to use the resources. If a Mac user is on 4.0b and wants to have the provisional morph edition, then they can install the beta, and the resources should automatically follow.
Enjoy these updates to your Göttingen Septuagint; and thanks for being patient with us while we make these resources even better!

A Commentary on the New Testament from the Talmud and Hebraica

A Commentary on the New Testament from the Talmud and Hebraica (4 Vols.)

If you’ve been watching the Pre-Pub page closely, you might have noticed a major addition this past week—John Lightfoot’s Commentary on the New Testament from the Talmud and Hebraica.

This commentary uses rabbinical literature to comment on the text of the New Testament, and to help modern readers understand the textual background from within the framework of Jewish literature. Lightfoot makes full use of Hebrew and Aramaic literature to provide thorough commentary on the New Testament. He uses Jewish sources to illuminate not only textual matters, but also the social and cultural context of the people, places, and events in the New Testament. This important work is meticulously written and has served as a model for synthesizing the New Testament with Jewish literature in the four centuries since its first publication. It covers the Gospels, Acts, portions of Romans, and 1 Corinthians.

First written in Latin, A Commentary on the New Testament from the Talmud and Hebraica was first published between 1658 and 1674, and reprinted as a whole in 1675, 1686, and 1699. The first English translation was published anonymously in 1684. It was reprinted in 13 volumes between 1822 and 1825 by John Rogers Pitman—an edition popular in the middle part of the nineteenth century. By the 1850s, however, the Pitman edition was becoming “scarce and expensive,” and work on a new edition was begun. The resulting work was published in 1859 by Oxford University. It remains the standard translation of Lightfoot’s work to this day, and has been reprinted numerous times—most recently by Baker in 1979 and Hendrickson in 2004. This is also the edition which underlies the electronic edition we’re planning to begin working on in the near future.

If you’re interested in Jewish studies and Talmudic literature, or you simply want to add a fascinating commentary to your library, you need to act now. This commentary has generated enormous interest this past week, and the Pre-Pub price is going up soon. Place your pre-order today to show your support for the project!

Upgrade Illustrated

180.jpgWe offer some great deals at Logos, but Phil’s post yesterday reminded me exactly how amazing the deal is when you upgrade your Logos base package. While Phil did all the number crunching, I thought I’d show you exactly what we’re talking about here.

In the picture here, you’ll see me standing next to four stacks of books. That’s 180 books to be exact. To help you gain a little perspective on how tall those stacks are, I’m 6’2″. Now, these stacks represent the number of new resources you get when you crossgrade from Scholar’s 3 to Scholar’s 4. As Phil pointed out yesterday, that crossgrade will only cost $127.50 (or even less*). Can you imagine walking into your neighborhood bookstore, carting all these books to the cash register, and saying, “I’ve only got $127.50. Will that be enough?”

Now, Phil’s post went on to explain that when you upgrade from Scholar’s 3 to Scholar’s Gold 4 you get more than 650 new resources for only $720 (or even less*). At the bookstore, that looks something like this:

650.jpg

While $720 is a bit of a price jump from $127.50, keep in mind that we’re talking about 650 resources. Not to mention that just one commentary set in the package (New American Commentary (37 Vols.)) would cost you nearly $720 all by itself… and you’ll be getting more than 600 more resources on top of this. What an amazing deal!

Then, there was Phil’s final comparison, upgrading from Scholar’s 3 to Scholar’s Platinum 4. In this upgrade you get nearly 950 new resources for only $907.54 (or even less*). That’s $.96 per volume and, in print, looks something like this:

950.jpg

Sure, quantity isn’t everything. Which is why I loved how Phil pointed out just a few of the quality resources from each package that prove the point that upgrading to Logos 4 is simply an amazing deal.

If you haven’t upgraded yet, today’s a great day to do it! Simply visit www.logos.com/upgrade to see the custom upgrade price for you.

* Your upgrade price might be even lower based on several factors. Visit our customized upgrade discounter to see your low prices. Also, these pictures are representative and the stacks do not contain the exact titles included in the base package upgrades. At 180 books, we disrupted our electronic text development department enough just making the first stack. Also, in case you couldn’t tell, we had to photoshop the stacks for 650 and 950. While we certainly have enough books in the building, we really started to feel bad for being such a distraction and, honestly, we were pretty afraid of seeing 950 books accidentally fall over on the floor. So, we hope you “get the picture.”

The Best Reason to Upgrade

Over the last two months, we’ve talked a lot about reasons you should upgrade to Logos 4, like

But one thing we haven’t really talked about in much detail yet is the absolutely amazing deals you get on some of the best Christian books on the planet with our base package upgrades. Here’s what I want to argue in this post: there are many great reasons to upgrade, but the most compelling reason—at least in terms of value—is the hundreds of new top-quality books you’ll get for an unbelievably low price.

I’ve worked here at Logos for just over two years now and was an enthusiastic customer for three years prior to that, and as someone who loves to find and get a good deal, I can assure you that they don’t get much better than this. Let me illustrate this with some of the resources you’ll get when you upgrade and a little number crunching.

Crossgrading from Scholar’s 3 to Scholar’s 4

Scholar's Library (LE)Let’s say you own Scholar’s Library for Logos 3 and you’re considering moving to Scholar’s Library for Logos 4. Did you know that you’ll get more than 180 new resources for only $127.50 (or even less*)? That’s $.70 per volume. Here are just a few examples of the titles that you’ll get:

Did you know if you bought just these 44 volumes by themselves, it would cost you $489.90 (or $669.90 after the two on Pre-Pub ship)? If you crossgrade for only $127.50*, you’ll get these 44 titles plus more than 136 others for $362.40 (or $542.40) less! That’s about 1/4 of the price for 4 times as much content! And that doesn’t even include all of the databases and features in Logos 4. So when we say you’re getting an incredible deal when you upgrade, we mean it.

But the further up you go, the more amazing the deals get.

Upgrading from Scholar’s 3 to Scholar’s Gold 4

Scholar's Library: Gold (LE)Let’s say that instead of just crossgrading from Scholar’s 3 to Scholar’s 4, you upgrade to Scholar’s Gold 4. Did you know that you’ll get more than 650 new resources for only $720 (or even less*)? In addition to the 180+ titles that I mentioned above, you’ll also get top-notch titles like

That’s an amazing amount of quality content. If you do the math, you’ll notice that these 170 volumes would cost you a whopping $3,725.68 if you purchased them all separately—and that’s at our sale prices, not full retail. If you upgrade for only $720*, you’ll get these 170 volumes plus nearly 500 others for $3,000 less than it would cost you to buy just these 170 volumes separately. Wow. That’s about 1/5 of the price for almost 4 times as much content! And, again, that’s not even including all of the databases and features in Logos 4!

Upgrading from Scholar’s 3 to Scholar’s Platinum 4

Scholar's Library: Platinum (LE)By now I think I’ve made my point—our upgrades are amazingly priced for the amount of quality content you get. But I’ll take it one step further. Let’s look at upgrading from Scholar’s version 3 to the brand new Scholar’s Platinum. In this upgrade you’ll get nearly 950 new resources for only $907.54 (or even less*). That’s $.96 per volume. In addition to all of the tremendous titles in the two lists above, you’ll also add to your library things like

If you bought just these 156 volumes by themselves, it would cost you $2,787.45. But think about this. If you’re coming from Scholar’s version 3, the difference in price between upgrading to Gold ($720*) and upgrading to Platinum ($907.54*) is only $187.54 (you’re getting an extra special discount for upgrading three levels higher). So if you were going to upgrade to Gold and think you might later purchase just one or two of the items in the list above, it would definitely be worth it to make the jump all the way to Platinum. Just look at all the extra content you’d get—and for less money, too.

I realize that we’re not talking about pocket change here, but if you’re serious about building a library of biblical and theological resources, there’s really no better way to do it—and there’s no better time than now, while we still have our extra low introductory upgrade discounts running. The great news for those of you who don’t carry this kind of money in your wallets is that you can use our payment plans on upgrades and spread out your upgrade cost over the next 3, 6, 9, or even 12 months.

So head on over while our lowest prices are still good, and check out your upgrade options. These deals are just too good to pass up.

* Your upgrade price might be even lower based on several factors. Visit our customized upgrade discounter to see your low prices.

A Christmas Miracle: The Virgin Birth

Today’s guest post is written by Kyle Anderson. Kyle has been an integral part of the ETD (Electronic Text Development) team for the last year.
Learn to Use Biblical Greek and Hebrew with Logos Bible Software

“Late in time behold Him come/Offspring of a Virgin’s womb”

Between singing “Hark! The Herald Angels Sing,” listening to sermons, and doing advent readings with my daughter, I can’t help but think about the significance of the virgin birth.

I thought I’d take the opportunity to show how to use Logos 4 to study the virgin birth. Typing Matthew 1 or Luke 1 into the box on the Home Page and clicking “Go” is a great place to start. Doing a Bible Word Study on parthenos (παρθένος) is also a useful exercise. You can launch a Bible Word Study from the Guides menu by typing g:parthenos or by right-clicking on virgin in a verse like Matthew 1:23, selecting “Lemma παρθένος,” and choosing “Bible Word Study.”

Another direction you might take is a systematic or theological one. I started by doing a search of my entire library for “Virgin Birth.” I instantly received over 7,500 hits. Awesome, but I wanted to make my search a bit more focused.

In order to narrow it down, I made a collection of my Bible dictionaries and encyclopedias. Searching only those books yielded a more manageable 565 results. I started by looking at the article “Virgin Birth of Jesus” in the Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible. Of its theological importance I learned, “From the very beginning the doctrine of the virgin birth became the foundation of a high Christology. Many have pointed out that the earliest church fathers stressed this more perhaps than any other event as proof of the incarnation and deity of Christ” (2126). And in New Bible Dictionary I read about Biblical evidence for the virgin birth outside of Matthew and Luke. It turns out those books aren’t the only place to go for allusions to the virgin birth. Paul makes a possible reference in Galatians 4:4.

The next thing you might do is ask, “What have Christian writers throughout the centuries had to say about the virgin birth?” I quickly made a collection of all my systematic theology books and discovered over 1,000 potential targets!

The first thing I checked was G. C. Berkouwer’s chapter in The Work of Christ entitled “The Great Mystery.” In it he dealt with the virgin birth at length and connected it with a doctrine of original sin: “In confessing the virgin birth we do not attempt to exclude Christ from the original sin which supposedly would be derived from a human father, but rather from the original guilt of all who are born of Adam” (129). Clearly that’s food for thought!

In Church Dogmatics I/2, Karl Barth called the virgin birth the “Miracle of Christmas” and described the coming of the Son of God in flesh through the Virgin Mary as a “new thing” outside our normal experience as humans. And because Jesus Christ came for us and our salvation, the exclusion of an earthly biological parent excludes the possibility of us humans contributing to our salvation in any way. The virgin birth is a sign of God’s total grace towards us.

However you celebrate your Christmas, Logos 4 is an excellent tool for understanding the significance of this important season.

Learn to Use Biblical Greek and Hebrew with Logos Bible Software

Learn to Use Biblical Greek and Hebrew with Logos Bible Software

Reliance on Greek and Hebrew for sermon content is in decline. At Logos, we are aware of the research which suggests less than 20% of pastors who have had biblical language training actually use that training on a regular basis. We’ve also taken note that many schools around the country no longer require Greek and Hebrew for seminary or pre-seminary training.

We hope to do something about that. Introducing a brand new series of lessons on using the biblical languages tools in Logos: Learn to Use Biblical Greek and Hebrew with Logos Bible Software. This is a complete set of video lessons in HD, which covers all the basics of interpreting the Bible using the Greek and Hebrew tools in Logos Bible Software. No prior knowledge of Greek or Hebrew is required, and even English grammar is explained. Even better, there’s no rote memorization of vocabulary lists, grammatical forms, or paradigms.

Dr. Heiser, one of the instructors, has done translation work in roughly a dozen languages—among them Hebrew, Greek, Aramaic, Egyptian hieroglyphs, Ugaritic cuneiform, Akkadian, and Sumerian. He recently sat down to talk about non-traditional methods of language learning in general, and this project in particular. Check out the complete video:

If you’re a pastor, these lessons are a great way to refresh the Greek and Hebrew skills you learned in seminary or Bible college. If your ability to study the Bible in the original languages has slipped in the years or decades since seminary, these instructional videos will get you back on track.

If you’re a lay leader who’s thought about seminary, but it’s never worked out, then this is your chance to learn how to use the Greek and Hebrew tools in Logos for your Bible study. With these videos, you can learn at your own pace, and avoid the stress of a college- or graduate-level classroom environment. Pause lessons, review previous material, and move on to the next lesson at your convenience.

For professors, Learn to Use Biblical Greek and Hebrew with Logos Bible Software is perfect for teaching preparation in your courses that focus on Greek and Hebrew tools for English readers. Use the videos to prepare your lessons. Learn new teaching methods, and glean ideas for your own teaching and research on the original languages. Professors teaching traditional first-year Greek and Hebrew courses can use the videos for showing students how to use their language training for exegesis. These lessons are also a great way to integrate technology into the classroom. Supplement your teaching and lectures with HD video. Help your students use Logos Bible Software for studying the Bible with the original languages.

We’ve already begun initial work on the project. The final videos will be in HD, but you can see some very rough previews right now posted on the product page. While you’re there, be sure to place you pre-order to show your support for the project! You can also interact with the instructors and ask questions about the project in the Forums.