N. T. Wright Collection Ships Soon: Last Chance to Pre-Order!

N. T. Wright Collection (34 vols.

N. T. Wright is one of today’s most important and well-known theologians. His work touches many disciplines—New Testament backgrounds, Pauline scholarship, the doctrine of justification, and much more. Wright was named by Christianity Today as a top theologian, and he is a respected scholar of the New Testament—especially New Testament backgrounds. He’s also known for writing in a style that makes complex scholarship accessible for a large audience.

A few months ago, we announced a project to make 34 of Wright’s books available in Logos. The collection includes 15 books in the For Everyone series, plus volumes on eschatology, the life of Jesus, Scripture, and much more. It also includes the bestselling Simply Christian.

In the next couple weeks, we’ll be putting the finishing touches on this massive collection, which means you have a little more time to pre-order it at a discount. Once it ships, the price will jump. That gives you one last chance to add 34 N.T. Wright books to your library at a phenomenal price, so pre-order it now!

In case you missed it, check out some clips from our recent interview with N. T. Wright:

N. T. Wright in Bible Study Magazine

The May–June 2011 issue of Bible Study Magazine features N. T. Wright. Subscribe in the next two weeks to get the N. T. Wright issue!

Leave us a comment and let us know what titles in the N. T. Wright Collection interest you the most.

Remembering A. W. Tozer

A. W. TozerMay 12 marks the passing of author, pastor, and editor Aiden Wilson Tozer. During A. W. Tozer’s forty-four year ministry, he pastored several churches and wrote more than 40 books. Although Tozer has been gone for 48 years, his words, through his books and sermons, still minister to the world today.

A Few Facts about Tozer

  1. As Tozer was walking home from his job one afternoon, he heard a street preacher say, “If you don’t know how to be saved…just call on God.” When Tozer got home, he did exactly that by going into his attic and praying.
  2. Tozer used an area in his family’s basement to spend time in prayer and meditation. Tozer’s friends say that he spent at least 5 hours a day in prayer by himself without contact with anyone else.  Tozer once said, “As a man prays, so is he.”
  3. After preaching, Tozer often refused to stand at the church door to shake hands with the congregation because in his mind, that was “glad handing people and setting himself up to be flattered and thus self-deceived.”
  4. Tozer served as pastor of Chicago’s Southside Alliance Church for thirty-one years. During his time there, the congregation grew from 80 to 800 members.
  5. The Moody Bible Institute radio station, WMBI, broadcast a weekly radio program from Tozer called “Talk From a Pastor’s Study,” which focused on Tozer’s studies at Southside Alliance Church. Because of these broadcasts, Tozer was asked several times to minister to Chicago-area Bible colleges.
  6. Tozer often quizzed his seven children on what they were reading and created special bedtime stories for them.
  7. In 2007, the A. W. Tozer Theological Seminary was established as part of Simpson University. The seminary offers graduate degrees in Bible and Theology within a “Tozer culture,” in which they strive to honor, respect, and cheer for one another.

What have others said about Tozer?

“If a sermon can be compared to light, then A. W. Tozer released a laser beam from the pulpit, a beam that penetrated your heart. If you have never read Tozer—what are you waiting for? Thirty minutes spent in a Tozer essay is often better than a week at a Bible conference.” —Warren Wiersbe, Bible Teacher

“Tozer lived for and preached Jesus Christ. Contemporary Christians can benefit by discovering—or rediscovering—his writings.” —Franklin Graham, President/CEO, Samaritan’s Purse

“Tozer was a man of incisive words and momentous thoughts. Their forcefulness and acuity make his writing richly rewarding to contemporary readers.” —Christian Reader

“A. W. Tozer’s books reflect a unique blend of genuine piety and downright common sense. He challenged every sort of spiritual pretension while evidencing a devotion to Christ that was every bit as sincere as compelling.” —Charles W. Colson, Author

Explore Tozer’s Words

The fifty-seven volume A. W. Tozer Collection contains books written by Tozer or compiled from his sermons and editorials posthumously. This collection is a great way to discover Tozer’s thoughts on a variety of subjects, read his powerful sermons, follow daily devotions, and look into major themes throughout his books.

Several individual titles from Tozer are also available including:

Leave us a comment and let us know your favorite Tozer book, quote, or sermon!

Apostolic Fathers and Syntactic Analysis

Most folks who have been around Logos for awhile know that I’m pretty excited about the writings of the Apostolic Fathers. I mean, I am spending a large chunk of my “free” time working on an interlinear of the Greek portions of these writings (it’s getting closer, thank you for asking).

Just think about it: these are guys who lived and wrote shortly after the time of the apostles (Peter, Paul, James, John, etc.), let’s say between 90–200 AD. Tradition reports some of them were direct disciples of apostles. For instance, Polycarp of Smyrna is reputed to have been a student of John (reported by Irenaeus, a student of Polycarp). Clement of Rome, according to tradition, also has ties to Peter and Paul due to them all having ties to Rome.

I get excited about these writings because they are some of the earliest records we have of Christians writing, thinking and putting the gospel into practice. They’re working out the issues. And they get some stuff wrong, just like we do. But the early church took these writings seriously. After all, the Epistle of Barnabas and Shepherd of Hermas were part of Codex Sinaiticus (one of the oldest manuscripts containing the complete Bible text, dating to the fourth century) and Codex Alexandrinus (another early Bible codex, dating in the fifth century, likely) had First Clement and Second Clement after the New Testament.

I was reminded about this again at BibleTech:2011 as two different presenters (not to mention other folks I spoke with) mentioned in their presentations how useful it would be to have more and deeper analyses of the Apostolic Fathers available.

The texts are clearly important. They help us understand early Christianity a little better and they help us understand Greek (both words and grammar/syntax) a little better. BDF (a standard reference grammar for Hellenistic Greek) references the Apostolic Fathers frequently, as does BDAG. It is rumored that Daniel Wallace, in an upcoming revision to his Exegetical Syntax, will extensively supplement his material with references to the Apostolic Fathers (see here for details).

With all of this stuff happening, it seemed like a good time to remind people that we at Logos (myself included) would absolutely love to do a Cascadia-style syntactic analysis of the Greek writings of the Apostolic Fathers. It’s been on Pre-Pub for over a year now and has languished.

If you think this would be beneficial to you in your studies, you could help bring it closer by subscribing to the Pre-Pub. While useful for searching, I find these analyses useful for reading too. They help me get an idea of how each clause is put together. Over time this has helped me immensely. Now when I consult Greek text in a format that isn’t graphed (like, on my iPod on Sunday mornings during church) I can see the structures even better as I work through the text.

Below is a sample (a mock-up; no, we haven’t really done this much work) of Ignatius to Polycarp, 2.3a:

Polycarp

Here’s a translation: “The time seeks for you, like shipmasters [seek for] wind and like storm-tossed sailors [seek for] harbor, to reach to God.”

Oh, yeah: If you’re really into this stuff, we have proposed doing a Cascadia-style syntactic analysis of the Septuagint as well (more info in a previous blog post).

Leave us a comment and let us know what you think about our syntactic analysis projects.

Richard Longenecker’s Biblical Exegesis in the Apostolic Period

Understanding the way that the Old Testament is used in the New Testament is an important part of Bible study. When you’re studying a New Testament passage that quotes the Old Testament, you need to know the reference and study further to discern the reason for the reference.
We have several resources that help with identifying the quotations (from modern translation cross references and parallel passage sets) and even have resources like Carson & Beale’s massive and helpful Commentary on the New Testament Use of the Old Testament.
But have you ever wanted to read and work through a study on how exegesis was done in the time of the New Testament? That’s what Richard N. Longenecker gives us with his excellent study Biblical Exegesis in the Apostolic Period. Longenecker gives us less of the “what” and “who” and much more of the “why”. He explains it like this in his introduction:

To speak of “Biblical Exegesis in the Apostolic Period” is, of course, to suggest something of our concerns and limitations. But more particularly it must be said that, in the first place, our interest is primarily with exegetical procedures—that is, with specific exegetical practices, with the presuppositions that underlie those practices, and with the manner in which biblical exegesis was carried on in the apostolic period—and only secondarily and as derived from such an inquiry will we concern ourselves with the broader issues of the relation between the testaments and the development of biblical religion. Secondly, the focus of our attention will be on the biblical quotations used by the various writers of the New Testament, and less directly on their development of biblical themes, the structure of their compositions, their allusive use of biblical materials, or their employment of biblical language. And thirdly, our desire is to trace out distinguishable patterns of usage and development that appear in the various strata of the biblical citations within the New Testament, particularly as seen when compared with Jewish exegetical practices and patterns of roughly contemporaneous times.
Richard N. Longenecker, Biblical Exegesis in the Apostolic Period (2nd ed.; Grand Rapids, Mich.; Vancouver: W.B. Eerdmans; Regent College Pub., 1999), 2.

Because Longenecker is studying how exegesis is done in the “Apostolic Period”, he evaluates other sources contemporary with the New Testament to understand how they use biblical quotations as part of better understanding what is going on in the New Testament. He writes:

I am concerned to have an accurate understanding of both Jewish and Christian hermeneutics during the period under study, believing that each must be seen in its relation to the other. In addition to the New Testament, therefore, we must give close attention to the talmudic literature (Mishnah, Babylonian and Palestinian Gemaras, Midrashim, Tosephta, individual “Sayings” collections, and related codifications), the Targums, the Jewish apocryphal texts (particularly apocalyptic writings), the Dead Sea Scrolls, and Philo. (Longenecker, Biblical Exegesis, 3)

It really is a fascinating book. And it isn’t in any of the Logos 4 (KF) packages. At $19.99 (at time of posting) it is a great book to add to your library and even to read on your iPod/iPad/iPhone.

Leave us a comment and let us know what some of your favorite Apostolic resources are.

Dr. Steven Runge Takes Discourse Grammar on the Road

Logos’ own Steven Runge has been invited to share his discourse grammar course at  Wycliffe Hall at the University of Oxford June 28-July 2, 2011.

Discourse grammar is not just for advanced New Testament scholars, but has proven really useful for beginning Greek students and pastors as well! Runge takes complex linguistic ideas and makes them accessible. His cross-linguistic approach focuses on exegesis instead of translation, helping you gain a much deeper understanding of the Greek text. Attention is given to describing the task accomplished by each discourse device. This function-based approach helps to conceptualize what is happening in Greek by understanding how the comparable task is accomplished in another language. If you’ve had a year of Greek and are comfortable working in an interlinear text, then you’ll benefit from attending.
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Rethinking Theology with the Moody Theological Studies Collection

I need to confess something.

The word “theology” used to freak me out. A few years ago, I couldn’t help but be intimidated by words like “exegetical” and “Septuagint,” not to mention issues like predestination that have been debated for centuries. These ideas seemed so far out of reach.
Moody Theological StudiesAnd since I wasn’t going to be pastor, I figured theology was not something I needed to be concerned about.

Boy, was I wrong.

Theology, which can be loosely defined as how we view God, influences every aspect of our life. Our thoughts about God—whether true or false—not only affect the choices we make, but how we view this world and ourselves.

Studying theology is just another way of saying you want to know God on a deeper level. Once I realized this, the word “theology” became a lot less intimidating. I didn’t need a Ph.D. or a background in Greek and Hebrew (although those are great things); I just needed a place to start.

In hindsight, I wish I could have started with the Moody Theological Studies Collection.

With ten books ranging from 90 to 1,376 pages, you have a concise collection of powerful knowledge that is also easy to read. Firmly rooted in Scripture, the authors address a full spectrum of foundational topics like predestination, worship, missions, spiritual maturity, and even economics!

Whether theology has intimidated you or not, if you have a craving to really know God and understand him, I would take a look at this collection.

Oh, and act quickly! The Moody Theological Studies Collection is on Pre-Pub and is about to go into development. It won’t be this price for long!

Leave us a comment and tell us how your view of theology has matured in recent years.

Ten Thought-Provoking John Wesley Quotes

Wesley

Recently, the John Wesley Collection (29 vols.) was placed on Pre-Pub. Not only does it contain the complete Works of John Wesley and Wesley’s Explanatory Notes for both the Old and New Testaments, but it also includes the authoritative eight-volume Journals of the Rev. John Wesley and an expansive, three-volume biography. To celebrate this awesome collection, I’ve put together ten of my favorite John Wesley quotes:

  1. “Every one, though born of God in an instant, yet undoubtedly grows by slow degrees.” —from a letter in the Works of John Wesley

  • “No circumstances can make it necessary for a man to burst in sunder all the ties of humanity. It can never be necessary for a rational being to sink himself below a brute.” —from Thoughts upon Slavery in the Works of John Wesley
  • “When I was young I was sure of everything. In a few years, having been mistaken a thousand times, I was not half so sure of most things as I was before. At present, I am hardly sure of anything but what God has revealed to me.” —from a letter in the Works of John Wesley
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    Our Best Selling Books on Marriage

    married couple

    Here at our headquarters in Bellingham, WA, the sun has just started poking out, tulips are blooming, and love, along with cotton, pollen, and many other allergens, is in the air.

    Hello spring time.

    Spring and summer are the most popular seasons for marriage in our part of the world and we thought it would be helpful to provide some resources for the couples, counselors, and pastors involved in pre-marital counseling.

    We recently went through our entire library of marriage books, grouped them together, and ranked them based on their popularity in the past 15 months.

    A few interesting notes:

    • Because buying a collection gives you the cheapest price-per-book, almost all of our collections outsell individual books.
    • We added many new individual titles in the past year which you may not have seen yet, such as Covenant Marriage by Gary Chapman and God on Sex by Daniel Akin.

    We hope these books will be a source of wisdom and inspiration as you grow in your marriage and encourage new couples to grow in theirs.

    [Read more...]

    New Endorsements for the Evangelical Exegetical Commentary

    Endorsements and reviews have begun to come in for Ezra and Nehemiah, the first volume to ship in the Evangelical Exegetical Commentary. Here are a few:

    “Israel Loken has done a masterful job of producing a commentary on Ezra that is exegetically thorough and theologically sound. He brings a solid biblical emphasis to the literary analysis of narrative literature and has combines the best of modern scholarly research with a profound respect for the text as God’s inspired Word. This volume needs to be in the library of any serious student of the Bible.”

    Dr. Charles Dyer
    Professor-at-Large of Bible
    Moody Bible Institute

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    The Thomas Cranmer Collection on Community Pricing

    Canmer
    Today’s guest blogger is Richard Wardman, a Logos-using Assistant Pastor from England currently studying for his MTh.

    About Community Pricing

    Community Pricing is a huge gift from Logos to its users, making some classic works available for bargain prices. Some people (like me, at first) might take one look at the chart, containing all kinds of dots, arrows and numbers, and run a mile. But once you’ve taken the time to investigate what it all means, the idea becomes crystal clear: Customers decide what books Logos produce, and what price they’ll pay (If you’re still confused, there is a great explanation of the program on the website)!

    One recent example would be the three-volume Edwin Hatch Collection. When enough people had placed bids to cover production costs the whole thing went for $8 (that’s under £5 for my fellow Pound Sterling friends). Right now it would cost you $39.95 on Pre-Pub (which is still a 56% savings on these books). That’s a huge saving for anyone who got in early under Community Pricing! [Read more...]