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Last Chance to Pre-Order The Expositor’s Bible Commentary

For years, The Expositor’s Bible Commentary has been one of our most requested commentary sets. Now, we’re pleased to announce that it will be available in Logos Bible Software in just a few days.

The Gold Medallion Award-winning Expositor’s Bible Commentary, published by Zondervan, is a major contribution to the study and understanding of the Scriptures. Providing pastors and Bible students with a comprehensive and scholarly tool for the exposition of the Scriptures and the teaching and proclamation of their message, this 12-volume reference work has become a staple of seminary and college libraries and pastors’ studies worldwide.

Some of the leading evangelical biblical scholars of the past half-century have contributed to The Expositor’s Bible Commentary, including:

The Expositor's Bible Commentary (12 Vols.)

  • F. F. Bruce
  • Bruce M. Metzger
  • Walter C. Kaiser, Jr.
  • Gordon D. Fee
  • I. Howard Marshall
  • D. A. Carson
  • James Montgomery Boice
  • Richard N. Longenecker
  • Lots of others. Head on over to the product page to see the complete list.

Each volume in The Expositor’s Bible Commentary contains an introduction to authorship and historical issues, outlines of each book of the Bible, exposition and notes on the entire Bible, detailed bibliographies on every book of the Bible, and more. It also covers textual issues, and transliteration and translation of Semitic and Greek words make the more technical notes accessible to readers unacquainted with the biblical languages. In short, this is the premiere evangelical commentary on the Bible, and it will be available in Logos Bible Software in just a few days. Head on over to the product page to place your pre-order before it ships on Monday.

Are You a Pradis User?

If you’re a Pradis user, we want to make your transition to Logos Bible Software as smooth as possible. We realize that you might have spent years building up the titles in your Pradis library, and you’ve made a significant financial investment in buying those titles.

For registered Pradis users only, Zondervan has authorized a special discount on The Expositor’s Bible Commentary in addition to the Pre-Pub discount. The discount is designed to help you transition to Logos Bible Software. If you’re a registered Pradis user, this is your chance to get your books in Logos Bible Software at rock-bottom prices. Remember, the discount applies only for Pradis users. To learn how to get your discount, read the previous blog post for all the details.

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Free Finnish Bible

Raamattu 1933, 1938 (Finnish Bible)

Do you read Finnish? Or do you know someone who does? Or do you just like free books, even if you can’t read them? :)

We’ve recently released the Logos edition of Raamattu—a Bible from the Finnish Bible Society. Best of all, we’re able to offer it for free.

The first Finnish translation of the Bible appeared in 1548 by Mikael Agricola. He used Luther’s German Bible as the translation base. In 1632, the Bible was again translated into Finnish, but this time using the original language texts. The complete version appeared in 1642, and new editions were issued in 1685, 1758, and 1776. In the early twentieth century, the need for an updated translation of the Bible into Finnish had become apparent. Work on the new translation was begun in 1911 at the initiative of the Finnish Bible Society and the Finnish Lutheran Church. The first translation work was finished in 1933, and the completed version was published in 1938.

Here’s how to add this translation to your library for free:

Logos 4 Users:

If you have Logos Bible Software 4, adding resources to your library is easy.

Go the product page. Click Add to Cart (or just add it straight to your cart from here). Proceed through the checkout process and click “Submit Order.” If you don’t have a credit card on file, you’ll still need to enter your credit card information. Don’t worry, you won’t be charged anything. It’s the only way to finish the checkout process in our current system.

In Logos 4, type “Update Now” into the Command Bar. Logos 4 will find and begin downloading new resources, and the Logos icon will appear in your system tray while this is happening. When it’s finished, you’ll be asked to restart Logos 4.

After you restart Logos 4, you’ll be able to access your new Finnish Bible. If you have a Logos 4 base package, you can also access it on your iPhone or iPod Touch using the Logos iPhone app!

If you’re not a Logos 4 user yet, be sure to visit the custom upgrade discount calculator to see what discounts you qualify for on an upgrade to a brand new Logos 4 base package.

Logos 3 / Libronix Users:

If you’re still using Libronix, here are the steps to follow to get your free book:

Step 1: Log in to your logos.com account. If you don’t have one, you’ll need to create one.

Step 2: Make sure that your Libronix Customer ID is associated with your Logos.com account. Go to My Account, enter your Libronix Customer ID, and click “Confirm.” If it’s already there, no need to do anything. (If you don’t know your Libronix Customer ID, you can find it in Libronix by going to Help | About Libronix DLS.)

Step 3: Go the product page. Click Add to Cart (or just add it straight to your cart from here). Proceed through the checkout process and click “Submit Order.” If you don’t have a credit card on file, you’ll still need to enter your credit card information. Don’t worry, you won’t be charged anything. It’s the only way to finish the checkout process in our current system.

Step 4: Unlock and download your new book. If you’re on a Windows machine, just click the orange “Unlock & Download” button. If you’re on a Mac, just synchronize your licenses (Tools | Library Management | Synchronize Licenses) and manually put the book file in your resources folder (Macintosh HD/Library/Application Support/Libronix DLS/Resources on the startup volume).

Step 5: Start using your new book! Open Libronix, open My Library, then type Raamattu to find it.

Spread the word! If you have Finnish-speaking friends, let them know that they can get a Finnish Bible for free.

An Alternate Book of Esther

I was flipping through the Esther volume of the Göttingen Septuagint and saw something unusual:

Göttingen Septuagint

If you examine this page carefully, you’ll see that the top section contains Greek text of a portion of Esther. Under that is a critical apparatus – a shorthand method of documenting manuscript evidence, showing which manuscripts agree with the text above and which manuscripts disagree, and how they disagree.
Then under the apparatus there is second section of Greek text (market by an L in the margin) followed by a second apparatus. We’ve seen something like this before. The ancient Greek book of Daniel, for example, exists in both the Old Greek and the Theodotion versions, and other editions of the LXX, such as Rahlfs and Swete, have presented both versions of that text either on facing pages or with one version on top of the other. Similar parallel texts are presented for the shorter and longer versions of Tobit and those parts of Joshua and Judges where codices Alexandrinus and Vaticanus disagree. But I’ve never seen this phenomenon in a printed edition of Esther before.
The marginal ‘L’ indicates that the text is thought by some scholars to be a Lucianic recension, or revision, of the Septuagint. Lucian was a Christian martyr who died in 312 AD and was famous for comparing the various Greek translations with the Hebrew Scriptures and preparing new Greek texts that were in greater agreement with the Hebrew originals.
However, the L-Text of Esther is different from the Septuagint text in some surprising ways that seem, to some scholars, inconsistent with the Lucianic reforms. The LXX and the L-Text both contain the so-called ‘Additions to Esther’ not found in the Hebrew Massoretic Text (MT), and the L-Text and LXX are significantly similar for those Additions. But in places where the L-Text and the LXX are clearly translating the same Hebrew, there is very little word for word correspondence. And at several junctures, it seems that the L-Text must be translating a different Hebrew source all-together. Carey Moore in his Anchor Bible volume on Esther, and elsewhere, has argued that the L-Text of Esther is really a fresh translation from a Hebrew original that is, at points, very different from the Hebrew (MT) that we have today. Followers of this line of reasoning usually refer to this as the Alpha-Text or A-Text of Esther, rather than the L-Text. If Moore is right, then the A-Text of Esther isn’t so much useful for determining the original text of the Massoretic version of Esther, but is rather more valuable for illuminating a version of Esther that no longer exists in any Hebrew manuscript known today.
Right now the Göttingen Septuagint is gathering interest on our prepublication program, listed at less than 1/10th of the retail price of the print volumes! The prepub has been well received, but we still need a few more orders to confirm that there is enough interest in getting the best Septuagint available into Logos Bible Software. So if you were sitting on the fence with this one wondering what you’d get that isn’t already in Rahlfs’ or Swete’s LXX, the A-Text of Esther is one example of the cool, useful things you’ll only see in Göttingen.
P.S. If you’re interested in the Septuagint, you might take a peek at Biblical Languages: Reference Grammars and Introductions (19 Vols.), which contains three volumes on the Septuagint: Swete’s classic Introduction (which examines the Lucianic recension on pages 80-86), the introductory grammar and chrestomathy by Conybeare and Stock and the reference grammar by Thackeray. If you want to lock in the early bird price, now is the time.

Which Commentary is Best?

Today’s guest post is from Dr. Steve Runge, a scholar-in-residence at Logos Bible Software and author of the Lexham Discourse Greek New Testament, Lexham High Definition New Testament, and the forthcoming Discourse Grammar of the Greek New Testament: A Practical Introduction for Teaching and Exegesis.

I get asked this question a lot, a people seems somewhat disappointed by my response of “It depends on what you’re doing.” It’s like being asked what the best tool is in my garage: the answer will always be “the tool best suited to my task,” depending on what I’m doing. Here’s what I mean.

When tackling a tough passage I’ll typically consult scholarly commentaries like the Anchor-Yale Bible or International Critical Commentary volumes, and even from the forthcoming Continental Commentary Series among others. I can guess your first question: “Why in the world would I want to read Claus Westermann on Genesis or Hans-Joachim Kraus on the Psalms, aren’t these guys pioneers in source and form criticism?” Why yes, as a matter of fact they are. But they also knew their Hebrew better than most folks alive today, and they have spent most of their lives studying these books in far greater detail than I ever will. I may not share their presuppositions about Scripture, but there is much to commend their exegesis.

One of the biggest hurdles I had to overcome in seminary was being willing to learn from someone with whom I disagreed with on certain issues. I learned to read past differences in order to learn from their expertise. In a previous post I mentioned the value of older commentaries, noting that many times you will find a more robust engagement of the text on works by Godet, Olshausen and Alford, who were not distracted by the modern issues that can preoccupy new commentators. But this is not to say there is never a time to interact with critical scholars. Like any tool, each one has its strengths and weaknesses, each contributes something to the process.

Before you get the wrong impression, you need to know that I also make regular use of more devotional commentaries. The Focus on the Bible Commentaries and Christian Focus Biblical Studies Collection are great examples. Getting the difficult exegetical questions answered is not all there is to studying a passage, you also need to be able to clearly and relevantly communicate what you have learned. If you like the academic side of things like me, you too may struggle with seeing the bigger picture of a passage: the theme, flow or theology of a passage or book. I can have all the greatest information in the world, but it is useless to the congregation if I cannot present it in a way that they can understand.

Most often the more technical issues never get mentioned in the sermon, but are more about me feeling like I have handled them. Less-academically oriented commentaries—yes, even the warm fuzzy ones—are a great safeguard against missing the “forest” because of looking too closely at a piece of bark on a single “tree”. I read devotional commentaries just a critically as I do the scholarly ones, sifting wheat from chaff.

So which commentaries are best? The ones that you need for what you are working on. Just like I use my hand saw for some applications and an axe for another, building a diverse collection of commentaries can be a great boon to your study. The academically-oriented volumes can address specific questions, whereas the “lighter” ones can provide great ideas for how best to present what you have found.

For a helpful guide to multi-volume commentaries available for Logos, see our Commentary Product Guide.

Custom-Built Bookcase for Sale, Low Miles

Today’s guest post is from Dr. Steve Runge, a scholar-in-residence at Logos Bible Software and author of the Lexham Discourse Greek New Testament, Lexham High Definition New Testament, and the forthcoming Discourse Grammar of the Greek New Testament: A Practical Introduction for Teaching and Exegesis.

This would be the heading of my want ad if I were to post one. You see, ten years ago when we bought our house, one of the first personal projects I did was build a custom, floor-to-ceiling bookcase in my new office.

At the time I was regularly buying Journal for the Study of the Old Testament Supplemental volumes, scholarly commentaries like Word Biblical Commentary, ICC, and the Anchor Bible and whatever else I needed to write my MTS thesis. This bookcase was to be the showpiece of my scholarly man-cave. I even inherited a great leather chair from an aunt-in-law, the kind that was scratched by a cat and isn’t allowed in the living room any more. Life was great—until something happened.

Continue Reading…

Lower Prices on Zondervan Titles and Discounts for Pradis Users

Zondervan

Last fall, we announced a new partnership with Zondervan, and we posted 87 books, commentaries, and reference works on Pre-Pub. Now, with just a few weeks remaining before the Zondervan books ship, we are pleased to announce lower Pre-Pub prices and steep discounts for Pradis users.

Lower Pre-Pub Prices

In general, Pre-Pub prices never go down. In fact, they often go up, which is always a good reason to lock in your Pre-Pub order at the lower price as early as possible.

We have been able to work with Zondervan to lower the Pre-Pub prices for nearly all of their books. To honor our commitment to our users who have already pre-ordered, we are going through all orders and automatically applying the lower price. That means if you’ve already ordered a Zondervan book on Pre-Pub, you don’t need to do anything to get the lower price. Your account has already been changed to show the new, lower price.

If you haven’t yet placed your Pre-Pub order, make sure you do so right away to lock in your order at the lower Pre-Pub prices. The massive 87-volume Zondervan Bible Reference Bundle has had the biggest price drop of any Zondervan collection, so that’s the best place to begin. It’s by far the best value—and the lower Pre-Pub price expires soon, so don’t miss out!

Shipping Soon!

We are only a few weeks away from shipping! All Zondervan Pre-Pubs will ship on Monday, April 5, with the exception of The Expositor’s Bible Commentary, which will ship even earlier, on March 15.

That gives you a little more time to lock in your order at the lower prices. If you haven’t yet placed your Pre-Pub order, don’t miss out on the deals!

Discounts for Pradis Users

If you’re a Pradis user, we want to make your transition to Logos Bible Software as smooth as possible. We realize that you might have spent years building up the titles in your Pradis library, and you’ve made a significant financial investment in buying those titles.

For registered Pradis users only, Zondervan has authorized a special discount of an additional 40% off the newly-lowered Pre-Pub prices. The discounts are designed to help you transition to Logos Bible Software editions for the same books you’ve already purchased in Pradis. If you’re a registered Pradis user, this is your chance to get your books in Logos Bible Software at rock-bottom prices.

Pradis upgrade discounts are available only over the phone for registered Pradis users. To get the discounts, give us a call at 800-875-6467, or (360) 527-1700 if you’re calling from outside the USA or Canada. We want to take care of each Pradis user individually, so you’ll need to call and speak with someone to verify your Pradis registration and get the discount on the Logos titles. Even if you’re a registered Pradis user and you’ve already placed a Pre-Pub order for Zondervan titles, you’ll still need to give us a call to get the discount.

The limited-time upgrade discount for registered Pradis users is only authorized for one combined order, so make sure you know exactly what you want to buy before you make that call. For example, if you call for the discount on the New International Dictionary of Old Testament Theology and Exegesis, and then call back a month later for the discount on the New International Dictionary of New Testament Theology, we are only able to honor the first upgrade discount. However, if you ask for the discount on both in one call, we can give you the discount on both sets.

The discount only applies for Pradis users who have purchased their books before January 1, 2010. These discounts expire on June 30, 2010, so you need to act now to get the discount. It’s in your best interest to apply the discount to as many titles as possible before they expire. If you’re a Pradis user, give us a call right away to get 40% off!

  • From the USA and Canada, call 800-875-6467.
  • From outside the USA and Canada, call 1-360-527-1700.

Last Chance!

Time is running out to save big on all the Zondervan titles. If you haven’t yet placed your Pre-Pub order, do it right away to save big! Head on over to Logos.com/Zondervan to see the complete list of titles.

Commentaries That Comment on the Text

Today’s guest post is from Dr. Steve Runge, a scholar-in-residence at Logos Bible Software and author of the Lexham Discourse Greek New Testament, Lexham High Definition New Testament, and the forthcoming Discourse Grammar of the Greek New Testament: A Practical Introduction for Teaching and Exegesis.

Frédéric Louis Godet Commentary Collection (16 Vols.)What do you look for in a commentary? Sometimes it’s insight into how a passage is structured; other times it’s understanding how a particular passage fits into some larger debate. Most often, though, you turn to a commentary when you get stumped by the text itself. After all, where else better to turn than to a commentary?

A commentary that primarily comments on the text would seem like an obvious thing, but in many cases as modern commentaries have gotten more and more specialized, less and less of the content actually focuses on the biblical text. Now there’s a place for all the debates and contemporary discussions that are ancillary to the text itself, but they can distract your focus.

One of my mentors told me that the best way to get answers to questions about how the text hangs together is to read commentaries that were written before the previous century, and he specifically mentioned Frédéric Louis Godet as an example. Men like Godet were writing in a time before the New Perspective on Paul, before many of the Enlightenment-driven critical methodologies were in vogue. As a result, far more of the content in these commentaries was actually devoted to commenting on the text. They did not get distracted from their primary purpose: expositing Scripture to help readers better understand and apply it.

If you’re interested in modern interpretive controversies, there are plenty of titles to chose from (see, e.g., our Commentaries Product Guide). But if solid engagement with what the biblical text actually says is what you’re after, I will pass on the advice that I have richly benefited from: check out Godet and the his contemporaries (e.g., Henry Alford, William Robertson Nicoll, John Eadie, J. P. Lange, and the authors of the Classic Commentaries on the Greek New Testament like J. B. Lightfoot, H. B. Swete, and B. F. Westcott). They provide an important balance to modern scholarship, filling in holes that unfortunately seem to be growing bigger as the years pass. Do not look down on the “dead guys.” READ them.

The 16-volume Frédéric Louis Godet Commentary Collection includes commentaries on Luke, John, Romans, and 1 Corinthians as well as important biblical and theological studies. It’s nearly 100% of the pre-orders needed to send it into production. If you’re interested in solid exposition of the biblical text, place your pre-order for the Godet collection today.

For more on this subject, see our previous blog posts:

New Anchor Yale Bible Collections

Anchor Yale Bible: New Testament (26 Vols.)

The Anchor Yale Bible is a prestigious commentary series of 84 volumes, and it represents the pinnacle of biblical scholarship, drawing from the wisdom and resources of Protestant, Catholic, and Jewish scholars from around the world. It includes Jacob Milgrom’s 3-volume Leviticus commentary, Joseph Blenkinsopp’s commentary on Isaiah, Joseph A. Fitzmyer’s commentary on Luke, Raymond E. Brown’s commentary on John, and a lot more—84 volumes in all.

Many Logos users picked up the entire set last spring when it was on Pre-Pub and got a great deal. But, for whatever reason, some missed out.

We’re now pleased to announce that the Anchor Yale Bible (84 Vols.) is available in two separate collections—a 26-volume set of New Testament commentaries, and a 58-volume set of commentaries on the Old Testament and Apocrypha. Even better, though the end of February, you can get these two new sets for an additional $200.00 off the sale price listed on the product page through the end of the month. Use coupon code ANCHOROT for the Old Testament commentaries and ANCHORNT for the New Testament commentaries. If you missed out on the Pre-Pub deal last year, this is your chance to add the Old Testament or New Testament commentaries of the Anchor Yale Bible to your library and get a great deal.

The combined sale prices for the Old Testament and New Testament sets are a little higher than the whole series together, so the entire 84-volume set is still a better deal if you want all the commentaries. But if your research interests lie in a particular genre of Scripture—like the Pentateuch—or you’re a pastor and you want to expand your library of commentaries on the Gospels or the Pauline epistles, then consider getting one of these sets while they’re on sale this month. The sale prices expire on February 28, so don’t wait!

All the commentaries in the Anchor Yale Bible are also among the 3,000 books (and counting) you can access in the Logos iPhone app. That means you can now access the entire set—84 volumes, 43,315 pages, and 160 pounds of print books—all in the palm of your hand, wherever you take your iPhone or iPod Touch.

Remember, this sale expires at the end of the month, so order now! Use coupon code ANCHOROT for the Old Testament commentaries and ANCHORNT for the New Testament commentaries at checkout to take an additional $200.00 off the sale price listed on the product page. Even better, you can use a payment plan to spread out the cost over the next several months. This is also a great way to apply your monthly or quarterly book budget to a new set of Anchor Yale commentaries.

Head on over to the product pages to learn more:

How Community Pricing Works

Community Pricing offers some amazing deals on classic works in the field of biblical and theological studies. Thousands of Logos users have gotten books for less than the price of a latte or a gallon of gas (which is around $3.00 in Bellingham, Washington).

For example, a few years ago, the R.A. Torrey Collection went for $15 on Community Pricing, $69.95 on Pre-Pub, and it now sells for $119.95. Even better—until Friday at noon, you can pick up Henry Alford’s New Testament for English Readers for $16 or less!

How Does Community Pricing Work?

We estimate how much it will cost to produce a book. Let’s say a book costs $10,000 to produce. It could get into production under a number of scenarios:

  • If 100 people bid $100
  • If 1,000 people bid $10
  • If 10,000 people bid $1

These are just examples, and this is a hypothetical book. There are also lots of other combinations of orders and prices that would get this to $10,000. But it should be clear that the more people bid, the lower the price is for everyone. It makes no difference what the final price is, as long as the costs are covered. The book will go into production whether one person bids $10,000 or whether 10,000 people bid $1. The math is the same.

What Does the Graph Mean?

Because there are endless combinations of orders and prices that push a project over the cost estimate, the progress for each book is tracked on a graph. This graph will give you an idea where most people are placing their bids.

You place a bid at the highest price you’re willing to pay. To do this, simply click on the dollar amount on the graph. Once the peak of the graph crosses the 100% threshold, bids are placed on the following Friday.

The New Testament for English Readers (4 Vols.)

How Should I Bid?

Let’s say a project crosses the threshold at $16. If you bid $16 or higher, your bid is placed. That means if you placed a bid for $20 or $30 for Alford’s New Testament for English Readers, you’ll still get it for $16 (or less). Unfortunately, if you bid less than the closing price, your bid won’t be placed.

The bottom line? Bid the maximum possible price you’d be willing to pay for a book. If you bid high you’ll never miss out on a deal, but if you bid too low you won’t be able to change your bid after the title moves from Community Pricing over to Pre-Pub.

If you’re still not sure what to bid, check out Phil’s post on A Bidding Strategy for Community Pricing from a couple years ago.

How Can I Help?

  • Bid on the books you want. Remember, you should bid the maximum amount you would be willing to pay for a book.
  • Spread the word! The more people who bid on Community Pricing, the lower the price is for everyone.
  • Subscribe to the Community Pricing RSS feed. That way you’ll be the first to know when a new title is posted.

What are you waiting for? Check out all the deals on Community Pricing today!

Moulton & Milligan’s Vocabulary of the Greek Testament

Do you find yourself living in a Greek lexicon as you work through the text of the New Testament?
Do you do look for the lexicon to tell you more about how a word is used, and the different contexts in which the word is used?
If you do, chances are you have already invested in what many consider to be the best lexicon for New Testament Greek, BDAG. And chances are that you love it.
Did you know that there is another Greek lexicon, focused on words that are used in the New Testament, that largely complements BDAG?
It is called The Vocabulary of the Greek Testament, put together by James H. Moulton and George Milligan in the early 1900′s.
Now, “The Vocabulary of the Greek Testament” is not a great name because it doesn’t just sound like a lexicon. But it is. And it isn’t a lexicon like BDAG is a lexicon. That is, it doesn’t re-plow the same field of sources (New Testament, LXX, Apostolic Fathers, Josephus, Philo, Greek Pseudepigrapha, etc.) that BDAG and other Greek NT lexica do; instead Moulton and Milligan (hereafter M-M, which is the way BDAG cites it) plow through the ground of the hordes of papyri that were found in the late 1800′s and early 1900′s, focused on papyri usage of vocabulary items that occur in the Greek New Testament (hence the “Vocabulary” name). They’re looking for insight from how these under-utilized papyri use the same words found in the Greek New Testament.
That’s why M-M is largely complementary to BDAG. They aren’t examining the same sources; they’re examining altogether different uses of the same words. And it is M-M‘s insight, from these scads of papyri that have been found and analyzed, that complements BDAG so well — in fact, so well, that BDAG routinely refers the reader to M-M where M-M has pertinent information. What kind of information? Here’s an example that Milligan uses in his introduction:

In what are probably the earliest of his letters that have come down to us, the two Epistles to the Thessalonians, St. Paul finds it necessary to rebuke his converts for walking “in a disorderly manner” (2 Thess 3:11). The word (ἀτάκτως), with its cognates, is confined to these Epistles in the New Testament, and what exactly is meant by it is by no means clear at first sight. Is St. Paul referring to actual sin or moral disorder, or to something less heinous? The papyri have supplied the answer in a striking manner. Among them is a contract of A.D. 66 [P.Oxy.II 275] in which a father arranges to apprentice his son with a weaver for one year. All the conditions of the contract as regards food and clothing are carefully laid down. Then follows the passage which specially interests us. If there are any days during this period on which the boy “fails to attend” or “plays truant” (ὅσας δʼ ἐάν ἐν τούτω ἀτακτήση ἡμέρας), the father has to produce him for an equivalent number of days after the period is over. And the verb which is used to denote playing truant is the same verb which St. Paul uses in connexion with the Thessalonians. This then was their fault. They were idling, playing truant. The Parousia of the Lord seemed to them to be so close at hand that it was unnecessary for them to interest themselves in anything else. Why go to their daily work in the morning, when before night Christ might come, they thought, forgetting that the best way to prepare for that coming was to show themselves active and diligent in the discharge of their daily work and duty.

If you don’t have The Vocabulary of the Greek Testament in your Logos Bible Software library yet (and it presently isn’t in any packages, not even Portfolio) you might want to consider adding it today.