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Why Christian History Matters

I’m a historian and a Christian. In fact, it was my study of history that led to my conversion. I realize this is an unusual progression, and perhaps it is a bias that leads me to believe that the common neglect of history among Christians is lamentable. But bias or no, the neglect is real, and I think I understand it: if our destiny is in eternity, and if Christ is immediate to each of us, of what ultimate significance is the past? Isn’t our relentless quest for the early church or the original manuscripts an implicit repudiation of history?

The value of historical knowledge, then, seems to be simply a matter of being articulate, of being well-read, or of being capable of apologetics. Or else, it has value as an antiquarian hobby—some find history interesting in the same sort of way that others find stamps interesting. If this is the case, surely history is at best ancillary to our Christianity.

But, I think this line of reasoning is mistaken. Rather, I would argue that the connection between history and Christianity is essential. Because the Incarnation was nothing less than the entry of God Himself into the stream of human history, it affirms the reality and value of the lived human experience. The Second Person of the Trinity affects our salvation not as an abstraction, but as a human life. In becoming a son, a friend, a teacher, in speaking our language and mourning our dead, God affirmed the temporal and social reality of our being. In entering our history at a specific time, in continuity with a meaningful past, and proclaiming a future of consummation, Christ repudiated the classical understanding of cyclical and ultimately meaningless history and codified the Jewish understanding of history as the story of God and His people, a story with a beginning and an end. Christianity has temporality in its essence.

With this in mind, the Christian ought to read all history as salvation history, and understand Christianity itself as having duration. It seems to me that a description of Christ that does not include his birth and childhood, while not necessarily wrong, is certainly incomplete; and, likewise, an understanding of Christianity that does not include its history.

And so, we must study history. From the Apostolic Fathers to the Reformation, from the ancient world, through the medieval, and into modernity, with Logos you can make a serious study of church history. We have large, comprehensive collections, such as the Calvin and the History of Calvinism Collection or the Philip Schaff Collection that allow you to dig deep into a historical topic, and we also have shorter histories written by prominent historians that will allow you to brush up on your historical knowledge, such as Church History in Plain Language or our Studies in the Reformation.

History is most profoundly understood, though, through the study of primary sources, such as those found in the A New Eusebius: Documents Illustrating the History of the Church to AD 337, or the Works of the Venerable Bede, and Logos has a massive library of such texts. Whether you want to study the ancient Jews  or the church as it enters the post-modern age, Logos has the resources. If you are unsure where to begin, try browsing Logos products by history products and see what piques your interest.

What are your favorite texts for studying Christian history? Leave us a comment and let us know.

The Versatile Ken Boa Collection

For the past twenty years, Ken Boa has been writing, speaking, and discipling across the country. As president of Reflections Ministries, Boa has worked hard to provide people with the tools they need to know and follow Christ.

We are proud to offer fourteen of his works in the Ken Boa Collection (14 vols.), which is on Pre-Pub now for $159.95.

This collection contains many resources including handbooks and daily devotionals, which address several different topics like spiritual living, Bible study, prayer, and more. If you really want to see the diversity in this collection, take a look at just five of the fourteen titles in this collection:

And with nine other titles in this collection, this diverse group of books will make a great addition to your library! Be sure to check out the Ken Boa Collection (14 vols.) while it’s on PrePub for $159.95.

Do you have a favorite book by Ken Boa? Leave us a comment and let us know!

How to Find a Bargain on Logos.com

There are definitely deals to be found on Logos.com. Here are some tips to ensure you don’t miss them.

Bid on Community Pricing Products

We often post on Logos Talk about deals that are available on Community Pricing because they’re some of the greatest bargains you are going to find on Logos.com.  The more people who bid on Community Pricing products, the lower the prices go. We’ve had collections sell for less than $10.

Puritan Sermons 1659–1689 (6 vols.) is a good example of the kinds of bargains you can find on Logos.com. The average bid for this six-volume collection of inspiring sermons, from the likes of John Owen and Richard Baxter, is $30. But it isn’t finished yet. With enough bids, the price can fall even lower!

Take a look at the Community Pricing page and see what’s available.

Check the Pre-Pub Page Often

Pre-Pubs are another way to get more book for your buck.

To justify the cost of developing a resource, we put that resource in Pre-Publication (or Pre-Pub). People vote on the resources they want to see developed by pledging to buy them while they are on Pre-Pub. Once we gather enough sales to pay for the creation of a resource, it moves from Pre-Pub into development.

During the Pre-Pub process, the resources are much cheaper than they will be once they are developed. The resources stay at that Pre-Pub price until they complete the development process. Once the resources are available for download, their price goes up.

It is a good idea to search the Pre-Pub page for the newest listings so that you can see when your favorite books go up. You’ll also want to check by ship date to make sure that you don’t miss out on getting a deal on a product that is about to ship.

Take Advantage of Faceted Browsing

Logos.com allows you to refine your search by a number of criteria. If you search the Products page for theology books sorted by price (lowest to highest), you are going to find all sorts of great deals. In fact, you might even run across some free resources. Try this with various topics and resource types.

Download Our Free Mobile Apps

I would be remiss not to mention Logos’ mobile apps. Both the iPhone app and the Android app (currently in beta) are completely free. With this free app you get over 40 Bibles! When you register or sign in to your free Logos account you get more than 30 additional books—absolutely free.

But that’s not all! You will not believe the Bible study you can do when you combine the iPhone app with a Logos 4 base package. Imagine having all of these features on your mobile device:*

  • Your resource library at your fingertips
  • Text comparison
  • Passage guides
  • Original language translations
  • Original language word studies
  • and much more!

At the low price of completely free, this is a true bargain.

*The Android app is currently in beta and, while it does have some great features, it has not yet reached parity with iPhone app.

Sign Up to Receive Special Email Notifications

Logos is often doing some kind of special promotion or giveaway. Sometimes you might not even know about it if you aren’t receiving our Freebies, Contests, and Giveaways emails.

We also send out Logos NewsWire emails alerting you to special prices and product news.

Receiving these notifications is easy. Sign in to your Logos.com account (or register for free) and click on the notifications tab. Then simply make sure that (A.) the Freebies, Contests, Giveaways and Logos NewsWire boxes are checked, and then (B.) click the update button.

 

Soon you’ll be getting updates on all the special offers available from Logos.

Keep Your Eye on Our Social Media Channels

Most Logos specials are going to be mentioned on one (if not all) of our social media outlets. And occasionally we will have specials that are specific to certain outlets. Don’t miss these events!

You can keep track of what Logos is up to by following us on:

  • Logos Talk: A great way to make sure that you don’t miss any important blog news is to subscribe to the RSS feed. You can have every blog sent to your email inbox or any web-based news readers you follow.
  • Facebook
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Leave us a comment and tell us about the best deal you have received from Logos.

Richard B. Gaffin to Edit the English Translation of Geerhardus Vos’s Reformed Dogmatics

Richard B. GaffinA few months ago we announced our intention to translate Geerhardus Vos’s Reformed Dogmatics into English. We put it on Pre-Pub to determine whether our users wanted this project to proceed, and the response has been overwhelming. Not only have lots of Logos users pre-ordered, but we’ve also received numerous notes of encouragement to pursue the project.

Today we are thrilled to announce that Richard B. Gaffin has agreed to edit the English translation of Geerhardus Vos’s Reformed Dogmatics. He will oversee a team of translators who will begin their work later this year. The complete English translation of Reformed Dogmatics is scheduled for publication sometime in 2013.

There are few individuals more qualified than Gaffin to edit this translation. He is an acclaimed Vos scholar, having published numerous articles on Vos, and editing Redemptive History and Biblical Interpretation: The Shorter Writings of Geerhardus Vos. Gaffin has taught at Westminster Theological Seminary in Philadelphia since 1965.

Right now you can pre-order the English translation of Reformed Dogmatics at a discounted price. The price will go up as the project moves forward, so to get the best price, you need to pre-order it now.

Who Is Geerhardus Vos?

Geerhardus Vos was an important theologian from the early twentieth century. He taught at both Calvin Theological Seminary and Princeton Theology Seminary alongside J. Gresham Machen and B. B. Warfield. He was an outspoken proponent of Reformed Biblical Theology. Cornelius Van Til has written that “Vos was the greatest pedagogue I ever sat under,” and John Murray said Vos was “the most penetrating exegete it has been my privilege to know.”

Vos’s Reformed Dogmatics synthesizes his work into a systematic theology, and it remains his most important un-translated work.

What are you waiting for? Pre-order it now!

What do you think of the project? Let us know in the comments!

Flavius Josephus

Titus Flavius Josephus is a tough figure to classify. Was he a cultural aristocrat? A theologically minded Pharisee? A politician? An author? A historian? In Josephus we find all of these things—and more.

Josephus was born into the Jewish priestly order of Jehoiarib, the first of twenty-four priestly divisions organized by King David (1 Chronicles 24:7). Growing up, Josephus surpassed his peers in his study of Jewish law. After studying under the Pharisees, Essenes, and the Sadducees—the three major religious factions in first-century Jerusalem—he affiliated himself with the Pharisees.

Jerusalem was a powder keg. With a constant disdain for Jewish ideals, Rome inflamed their already tense relationship with the Jews. Between liberal use of Roman soldiers against Jewish citizens and Messianic Jewish factions who taught that the world would be ending soon, a number of factors were coming together to create the perfect climate for conflict. By the time Jospehus had returned from a trip to Rome to negotiate with Nero for the release of imprisoned priests, his nation was in revolt.

Despite skepticism about an uprising, Josephus took the post as military leader in the region of Galilee. Not all of Galilee was supportive of revolution, and insurgents hoped to use Josephus’ birthright and successful negotiations with Rome as inspiration to the hesitant Galileans. Josephus found himself fighting a defensive war against an overwhelming force while simultaneously trying to quell conflict within Jerusalem.

Josephus Supports Rome?

This is where Josephus’ story takes a strange turn and why many consider Josephus an opportunist and a traitor.

The Galilean city of  Jotapata had fallen, and Josephus had found himself trapped in a cave with forty other Jewish supporters. Fearing the worst, and not wanting to fall into Roman hands, a suicide pact was decided upon. They all agreed, standing in a circle  each second man would kill the third. Josephus considered it the providence of God that he and one other man were the last living. He convinced his fellow soldier they should give themselves over to the Romans.

Many modern scholars accuse Josephus of orchestrating this outcome. (In fact, the Josephus Problem has become a mathematical problem where a person must decide where to stand in this circle in order to be the last one living.)

Josephus began to work for the Romans giving them information on the insurgence. Rome also put him to use trying to convince the rebels to surrender. Jerusalem would not heed the warnings of this traitor however, and an agreement was never reached.

In 70 A.D., Josephus was eyewitness to the siege of Jerusalem. Rome destroyed the Temple and Jerusalem was sacked. According to Josephus, over 1,000,000 people were killed during the siege, with another 97,000 taken hostage. The death toll was high and the loss of the Temple dealt a destructive blow to both Jewish identity and their ability to rally. The revolution was brought to a swift end.

Josephus Writes His Histories

After becoming a Roman citizen, Josephus was commissioned by Caesar Vespasian to write an account of the Jewish revolt against Rome. Josephus finished The War of the Jews in 78 A.D. By the year 93, Josephus had finished his second major work The Antiquities of the Jews (a landmark history of the Jews from Creation through the occupation of Palestine). In the latter part of his life he wrote Against Apion and his autobiography The Life of Flavius Josephus. 

Flavius Josephus remains one of our best sources of first century history as well as an essential resource for Old Testament textual criticism.

Josephus Resources from Logos

Not only can you get the complete Works of Josephusas well as Josephus in Greek: Niese Critical Edition with Apparatusfrom Logos, but there are many more great references to help you get a grasp on his life and works.

Brill Academic has published many works on Josephus’ writings. The Brill Josephus and the Bible Collection (currently on Pre-Pub) contains four volumes full of enlightening research:

  • Studies in Josephus’ Rewritten Bible
  • Josephus, Judaism and Christianity
  • Josephus, the Bible and History
  • Passover in the Work of Josephus

If you are interested in what Josephus can bring to your Bible study and understanding of first century history, the Brill Josephus and the Bible Collection is a good selection to pick up while it is on Pre-Pub at over 50% off!

Other Great Resources

If you are still looking for some books on Josephus check out:

Leave us a comment and tell us how exposure to Josephus as improved your understanding of the New Testament context.

Honoring Stephen H. Levinsohn: The Backstory

We announced the Steven Runge’s presentation of  Discourse Studies and Biblical Interpretation: A Festschrift in Honor of Stephen H. Levinsohn to Levinsohn on the blog on July 5. Here is the story behind this event.

We all have people who’ve played a pivotal role in shaping and equipping us. It has been a great blessing working with Logos to produce projects like the Lexham Discourse Greek New Testament, the Lexham High Definition New Testament, and A Discourse Grammar of the Greek New Testament. But these projects didn’t just come out of a vacuum. They began with a dissatisfaction with how I was taught Greek and Hebrew, and the inspiration of a mentor who showed me a way forward.

When I studied languages in seminary, I left feeling like I hadn’t gained the proficiency needed to really use them effectively in ministry. I soon found many others felt the same way about their language training, like something was missing. The question was, what exactly was that “something?” I felt called to find more effective ways of using biblical languages in ministry, but had little idea of where to start. I began praying that God would raise up a mentor who could equip me to do what I felt called to do.

The person that God raised up was Stephen Levinsohn. Levinsohn has spent his career as a Bible translator with Wycliffe and as an International Linguistics Consultant with SIL International. He was translating in the jungles of Columbia before I was born. By the time I’d finished seminary in 1999, Stephen had worked with literally hundreds of languages, becoming one of SIL’s top discourse specialists.

I stumbled across an article he had written in 2000 that was exactly the kind of work I wanted to be able to do. Levinsohn spent most of his year teaching translators, going to the remote corners of the world where the translators were located rather than having them come to where he lived in England. After several years of correspondence I hit a wall in my learning. I had read about all I could digest, and really needed face-to-face time where I could ask questions and get ideas clarified. I asked if there was any way I could go on one of his trips with him to learn more about what he did.

It just so happened that due to a medical issue Levinsohn was unable to travel for a few months, so he had arranged to teach a discourse analysis class in England. Thankfully, it was offered in the dead of winter, the easiest time for me to shut down my construction business. The skills I learned from that course, along with his continued mentoring, have proven invaluable to fulfilling my calling of helping pastors and students better understand the Bible in its original languages.

So how do you thank someone who’s had such a big influence on you? Well in the academic arena, former students and colleagues of a professor will write articles, collect them in a book called a Festschrift, and present them to the honoree on some special occasion, like their retirement or significant birthday. About two years ago I began laying the groundwork to organize such a book for Stephen Levinsohn. I contacted scholars he’d worked with, arranged for a special session when the book could be presented, and then served as editor for the project. John Barry of the Publications department did an incredible job overseeing the project and helping me through the process. The goal was to surprise Levinsohn and present the book to him at the International Meeting of the Society of Biblical Literature in London this July.

On the morning of July 4, 2011, a group of scholars gathered for the sole purpose of honoring a career missionary’s contributions to biblical scholarship. Everything came off without a hitch, Levinsohn didn’t find out about any of it until the day before! Several of the contributors read papers we had written, and that night we had a lovely dinner overlooking the Thames River. What a memorable day!

Mentors have played an incredibly significant role in shaping me, and I believe its important to recognize their contribution. Seeing Stephen honored has been a bucket-list item for years. His work has largely gone unrecognized since much of it is focused on translation. His mentoring has saved me years of learning things the hard way.

Many times in the last year when I’d be telling someone about the Festschrift project and why I was doing it, I’d choke up or get tears in my eyes. It wasn’t business, it was very personal. It struck me that although God had given me a calling, I could not have done it without mentors like Stephen equipping and preparing me. During one of my last conversations with Stephen on the trip, he reminded me of the importance of 2 Timothy 2:2, asking “Who are you pouring into?” It was a great challenge.

If you have wondered about discourse studies and what it has to offer for interpreting the Bible, I’d strongly recommend ordering Discourse Studies and Biblical Interpretation: A Festschrift in Honor of Stephen H. Levinsohn. The list of contributors is a who’s who of biblical scholars working in this area. And on a personal note, think about those people who’ve played pivotal role in shaping you. Find some way of letting them know the impact they’ve had on you; don’t let it go unspoken. And be sure to pass on what has been entrusted to you!

If you could do a tribute project for a mentor who has been a huge influence and inspiration in your life, who would it be? Leave us a comment and tell us about them.

Collins Bible Companion Wins Award for Best Reference Book

Logos Bible Software would like to congratulate Martin Manser, editor of the Collins Bible Companion, which recently won the 2011 Christian Resources Together Award for Best Reference Book of the Year. Manser’s Companion gives highly readable historical, social, and literary context for the Bible in an attractive, full color design. Opening this book up in Logos with your favorite Bible translation makes for a whole new experience in Bible study. Just check out some of its cool graphics:

Literary Genre Infographic

Solomon's Temple Infographic

Paul's Journeys

The Collins Bible Companion includes study sections on God, Jesus Christ, the Holy Spirit, Humanity, Salvation, Last Things, and so much more. From the table of contents, you can jump to any book of the Bible, maps, articles, photographs, timelines, over fifty studies on how to apply the message of the Bible to your life, and more. This visually stunning book is packed with ideas and information that will take your Bible study, Sunday school classes, or small group conversations to a whole new level.

Its easy to see why Martin Manser’s Collins Bible Companion took first place as the Reference Book of the Year. And right now we have it on sale for only $29.95. Pick it up today!

If you already own the Collins Bible Companion, leave a comment and let everyone know what a great resource this is!

Digging Deeper into the Lives of Historical Figures

Charles Wesley wrote and published thousands of hymns during his career including “Hark! The Herald Angels Sing” and “Christ the Lord is Risen Today.”

However, Charles was much more than a poet. In A Heart Set Free, Arnold Dallimore demonstrates how Charles earned a place in history as one of the most powerful preachers and evangelists of the Methodist Revival.

The Welwyn Biography Series, which includes A Heart Set Free: The Life of Charles Wesley, contains eight biographies that dig deeper into the lives and stories of important figures in both historical and contemporary church history.

From missionaries like David Brainerd to preachers like William Huntington, these individuals were influential in the life of the church. Examining the stories of these individuals in the social and spiritual context of their time can certainly encourage your work and ministry.

Be sure to check out the Welwyn Biography Series while it’s on Pre-Pub!

Which character in the Welwyn Biography Series are you most familiar with? Leave us a comment and let us know!

5 Ways Logos Is Helping You Do Better Bible Study

To suggest that the quality of the Christian life is directly proportional to the time spent reading and studying the Bible is no overstatement. One significant way that God has chosen to reveal Himself is within the Christian Scriptures and through study we gain a better understanding of God and the world around us.

Bible study is important to you, and it is Logos Bible Software’s intent to provide you with the best Bible study tools imaginable. Here are a handful of ways that Logos is doing just that:

1. Logos 4

In November 2009, Logos released Logos 4, a huge step forward in Bible study software. Logos 4 provides the tools for a learning environment that caters to your needs. Whether you are new to Bible study, or are working on a doctrinal thesis in biblical studies, Logos 4 has what you need.

You might want to study the Bible’s original Hebrew, Aramaic, and Greek, or gain a greater understanding of eastern geography, or need help understanding biblical genealogies. Logos 4 can help!

Logos 4 doesn’t bury you in a sea of text, there are tons of high-resolution infographics available to help you visualize the truths that you are learning. When you couple these infographics with Passage Analysis (another example), you can see that Logos 4 helps both the analytical and creative thinker get the most out of their study.

With a Logos 4 base package, you can begin your studies with some of the best resources imaginable. But that’s not all, you get these resources at truly crazy prices. Scholar’s Library: Platinum includes nearly 1,250 resources at 90% off of the equivalent print editions!

2. Logos iPhone App

For the longest time, the strength of a bound Bible was in its portability. Desktop computers introduced the ability to search and study the Bible with ease and speed, but they required Bible study to be done in the same location every day. Laptops increased the portability of Bible study software (in fact, Logos 4 syncs between multiple machines enabling you to work on your desktop PC or Mac and pick up right where you left off on your laptop whether at work or your favorite coffee shop).

But what if you could have the Scriptures and thousands of books right in your pocket? What if all of that lost time spent standing in lines, sitting in lobbies, waiting for appointments could be spent catching up on your daily reading plan or doing some of that research you wanted to get finished? What if some of that wasted time in the day could be redeemed? I mean really redeemed with the Word of God? What if you had one of those moments where someone could really benefit from what you were just reading this morning, and you would like to show it to them—right then and there? This is the beauty of Logos 4 combined with the portability of your *iPhone, iPad, or even your iPod Touch! You can take your research library anywhere.

You would be hard-pressed to find a free Bible app that can do as much as the Logos app does. Even without Logos 4, the app gives you immediate access to many resources and Bibles (including the ESV and New Living Translation). Simply sign up for a free account, and you get more than thirty extra resources including Spurgeon’s Morning and Evening and Easton’s Bible Dictionary (over $30.00 in free resources in those two books alone).

It’s when you add a base package into the mix, the app really blossoms. With a majority of your library available anywhere you have internet access and lots of great features, this is Bible study on the go.

* Android users, we are currently beta testing the Android app!

3. Biblia.com

Logos is looking to improve Bible study by giving you one license with many options to access your content. Biblia.com is another tool to that end.

With Biblia.com you can do online Bible study anywhere! It’s just that easy. Just like with the Logos app, Biblia.com will give you instant (free) access to a good number of Bibles. Sign up with a Logos.com account and add about 30 free Bible study books to that number. Already a user of Logos 4 or the iPhone app? Simply sign in with the same account.

When you sign in with your Logos 4 account, your resources are pulled down from the cloud for you. Read your Bible side-by-side with your favorite commentary or any of your other resources. With shared licenses between Logos 4 for Mac, Windows, iPhone, iPad, Mobile Web, and Biblia.com, your content is available wherever you are.

4. Bible Study Magazine

What if you could have someone stop by your house six times a year whose sole aim was to help you get more out of your Bible study? This person would provide you with deep insight, inspiring testimonies about the value of biblical study, suggested resources, and stories about how the world is being changed by those who place a high value on the study of the Word.

With Bible Study Magazine, this is almost precisely what you get—an inspirational tutor delivered right to your mailbox. The number of magazines dedicated to Christian themes is staggering, but Bible Study Magazine is the only magazine dedicated entirely to studying the Scriptures.

If you are on the fence, why don’t you check out this issue for free. We think you’ll agree, there is something special about Bible Study Magazine.

5. Logos.com

Logos.com is an amazing tool, providing valuable links to:

At Logos.com you can start with a base package, and then build the perfect resource library by adding the resources you want. Take advantage of our Pre-Publication specials, or try setting your own costs with Community Pricing.

Make the most with Logos 4 with help from the support page which includes videos, articles, training, and many other tools.

It has been nearly 20 years since Logos Bible Software was started with two programmers in a basement determined to create a tool to help people study the Bible. Times have changed, and those two programmers has grown into a company of over 200 people offering nearly 14,000 resources for Bible study. The times may have changed but the objective hasn’t. That goal is summed up in the Logos Bible Software mission:

To help more people do more and better Bible study.

We want to thank all of you who have joined us on this journey, and we look forward to supplying Bible study tools to those who will join us in the future. Leave us a comment and let us know how Logos has changed the way you do Bible study.

Tackling the Thorny Issue of Hell

Back in February of 2011, the blogosphere erupted in response to a book challenging the traditionally accepted view of Hell. Social media outlets quickly blew up as well. All sorts of people were coming out of the woodwork to debate and defend a topic which might not normally receive a lot of attention.

Twitter was aflame with words like “universalism” and “annihilationism.” Theological terms regarding eternity were being discussed openly on a medium usually reserved for much more trivial concerns. It seemed that, even if momentarily, Hell had gone mainstream.

Opportunities to discuss issues of eternal consequence, while the general public’s interest is piqued, are rare. With all of the increased discussion, people generally want to know, “What exactly does the Bible say about Hell? How are these passages interpreted? And what are commonly accepted orthodox views?”

Logos has many resources available to help not only solidify your personal stance, but to prepare you for such discussions.

One thoughtful resource can be found in the Contemporary Issues Collection (7 vols.) In Hell: A Hard Look at a Hard QuestionAnglican priest and Archdeacon of Frankston, David Powys dissects the New Testament passages in regards to the fate of the unrighteous.

Powys divides his research into three parts:

  • Historical survey:
    In this section, Powys discusses the perspectives of church fathers like Gregory of Nyssa and Augustine of Hippo. Then he turns the microscope on the pre-reformation era’s views on eternity.
  • Jewish thought and Greco-Roman influence:
    Here Powys dissects Old Testament beliefs about judgment and the afterlife. He then uses the Apocrypha and Pseudepigrapha to examine how the Hasmonean era affected Jewish thought and rabbinic tradition. This is followed up by looking at both Roman influence and Pharisaical tradition.
  • New Testament passages:
    Looking closely at the Synoptic Gospels, Paul’s epistles, and Johannine literature, Powys interprets the New Testament’s passages dealing with the fate of the unrighteous.

At 508 pages, this book is the largest in the Contemporary Issues Collection. This collection comes with six other titles to help you tackle hot button contemporary issues from a biblical perspective. Whether you are looking for a resources regarding feminism, Christian political involvement, deistic sovereignty, Israel, or a scriptural view of law and justice, The Contemporary Issues Collection will help. And it is currently for sale on Pre-Pub for less than $.05 a page!

If you are looking for more resources dealing with the subject of Hell, Logos has you covered. Other helpful titles dealing with this hot button issue include:

Ultimately, public interest in discussions about Christian topics—even the thorny ones—is a win. Any opportunity to discuss a topic that leads back to the Gospel is positive. With Logos you can follow Paul’s admonition to “be ready in season and out of season; reprove, rebuke, and exhort, with complete patience and teaching.” (2 Timothy 4:2, ESV)

What other Logos resources have helped you in your studies on the topic of Hell? Leave us a comment and tell us about them!