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Dean Deppe Talks Exegesis with Logos Talk: Part II

Yesterday we featured part one of a two-part discussion with Dean Deppe, Professor of New Testament at Calvin Theological Seminary. In part one, Deppe discussed the exegetical methods he promotes in his book All Roads Lead to the Text: Eight Methods of Inquiry into the Bible. Today, in part two of our interview, Deppe shares how Logos Bible Software factors into his process for biblical interpretation.

Logos: What about All Roads Lead to the Text would be of particular interest to Logos users?

Deppe: At Calvin Seminary we require the use of Logos Bible Software for every student, and we have an entire course in the curriculum which teaches students how to use the software. We believe the tools Logos supplies motivate pastors and preachers to continue to do a thorough job of exegesis—including the use of the original languages of Hebrew and Greek. In addition, I know that Logos is interested in how the software is employed in the classroom, so throughout the book I demonstrate how to use the software in exegesis. Since Bible software is becoming more important for research and analysis, many of the exegetical examples demonstrate how to employ Logos Bible Software to attain quick and accurate results.

Logos: Wow, that’s great! How do you use Logos Bible Software for exegesis?

Deppe: I talk about three main ways I use Logos for exegesis:

  1. I introduce tools developed by Logos which make exegesis easier, quicker, and more fun. For instance, when I discuss the importance of establishing the contours of a pericope, I demonstrate from the “Compare Pericopes” tool. In the chapter on structure I use the Lexham Clausal Outlines of the Greek NT and the Lexham Syntactic Greek NT  [both available in Scholar's Library and higher]. In the chapter on grammar I demonstrate the value of visual filters. When I discuss translations, I teach the reader how to construct a layout of all the major Bible translations that you can easily return to on a regular basis.
  2. I recommend works from Logos which you can add to the base packages for greater research ability. In the chapter on historical background, I suggest a collection of Bible dictionaries and demonstrate how to set up a collection of resources to search for information.
  3. I perform specific basic, Bible, and morphological searches using the software to demonstrate the exegetical process.

Logos: Can you give us an example how Logos Bible Software is used on a specific text?

Deppe: Sure! For instance, the colorful nuances of the Greek noun καταρτισμὸν for “equipping” the saints in Ephesians 4:12 are difficult to determine, since this word occurs only here in the Greek Bible.

But other searches in Logos Bible Software can uncover similar roots. If one attempts a morphological search in the NIV or ESV by choosing Logos Greek Morphology and typing in g:katarti (g for Greek and katarti as the root of words connected to “equip”), several interesting references to the Greek verb καταρτίζω are revealed.

Such passages include Matthew 4:21; 1 Corinthians 1:10; and Luke 6:40 which throw light on the meaning of “equip.”

  • In Jesus’ calling of James and John to discipleship in Matthew 4:21, this Greek word contains the imagery of repairing nets implying that “equipping the saints” means repairing people’s lives.
  • 1 Corinthians 1:10 employs the additional imagery of reconciling two conflicting parties.
  • Finally, Luke 6:40 describes modeling behavior so that the training of the saints implies a process whereby the student resembles the teacher.

Therefore to equip the saints encompasses:

  • repairing people’s lives,
  • training them in conflict management, and
  • modeling Christ-like behavior.

A search in Logos supplies some interesting pictures!

Or another example where you search your various Bible dictionaries quickly without taking them down from the shelf and attempting to find the correct page. Automatically, while studying Mark 6:11 about shaking off the dust of your feet, Logos Bible Software will bring up all references in your collection of Bible dictionaries.

Here’s what I mean:

  • Harper’s Bible Dictionary calls attention to the importance of hospitality in Jewish culture.
  • The Dictionary of Biblical Imagery goes further and demonstrates that this action also signifies divine judgment. Human disdain of God’s servants has aroused God’s righteous anger.
  • But continuing to search you discover The Exegetical Dictionary of the New Testament which describes shaking the dust off your feet as a gesture that is practiced after leaving Gentile territory. Normally, Jews shake off the dust when they exit pagan territory; however, now the disciples are treating their fellow Jews as pagans when they do not accept the gospel message of Jesus. Jesus is creating a new family and nation that is bound together by faith and not blood.

As you can see, a quick search like this supplies a plethora of meaning to this Jewish gesture.

Logos: How do you envision your book being used?

Deppe: This book is aimed at seminary students, pastors and preachers, and educated lay people who desire to read the Bible In addition, it can be used for small group study and additional research through the discussion questions at the end of each chapter.

Logos: How do you think All Roads Lead to the Text will appeal to other biblical professors?

Deppe: For one thing, it offers a great teaching method for students and can be employed as a textbook. But the appendixes contain some vital material not found together anywhere else. I include a morphology of genre which describes the various sub-genre in Scripture and add a succinct list the principles of interpretation for the main scriptural genres. Specifically, I describe in detail all the controversy dialogues in the Gospel of Mark and then offer an analysis of how literary devices are employed for organizational purposes in the Bible. This material should be stimulating to the academy.

Logos:  What tools from Logos Bible Software do you think are the most helpful for the average pastor or teacher?

Deppe: I use lots of tools. These are some of the tools I find most helpful:
  • I employ the layouts every day. Instantly I can set up a study a NT grid with the Greek text and all the major Bible versions in my purview. I have layouts for the Apostolic Fathers in Greek and English, Philo’s writings, the Dead Sea Scrolls, Josephus’ writings, and the Pseudepigrapha.
  • While I am studying a particular text, I can call up a commentary, and it automatically proceeds to the passage I am examining. What a time-saver!
  • Since we live in a visual age, I love the visual filters which let me color code the tenses of the verbs, for instance.
  • With Logos I also have my own concordance and can easily search various texts.
  • Word studies have always been important in preparing Bible studies and sermons.
  • I also frequently use the Bible Word Study and Exegetical Guide. Both are easy to work with and comprehensive in Logos.

I have pastors email me every month and thanks us for the training we have given them in Logos Bible Software at Calvin Theological Seminary.

We want to thank Dean Deppe for taking time to talk to us! Make sure to check out All Roads Lead to the Text: Eight Methods of Inquiry into the Bible while it is on Pre-Pub!

Tell us how Logos Bible Software helps you do exegesis.

Dean Deppe Talks Exegesis with Logos Talk: Part I

The Bible can be a difficult book to interpret. Churches split over the interpretation of controversial texts, and many Bible readers feel bewildered about tough passages of Scripture.

To help clarify and outline various methods of exegesis and interpretation, Dean Deppe, Professor of New Testament at Calvin Theological Seminary, has written All Roads Lead to the Text: Eight Methods of Inquiry into the Bible, currently on Pre-Pub.

In a way, this is a book designed for Logos users. Deppe an avid Logos user himself (he used Logos Bible Software as he wrote the book), and All Roads contains numerous examples of how to use Logos for exegesis and interpretation. So not only is this book vitally important for general readers, but it is especially beneficial for Logos users who are serious about understanding the text.

We were excited when Dr. Deppe took time out of his busy schedule to talk to us about All Roads Lead to the Text: Eight Methods of Inquiry into the Bible. What follows is the first half of a 2-part discussion.

Logos: Why did you write All Roads Lead to the Text?

Deppe: Interpreting the Bible can be frustratingly difficult for the average person. The eight chapters in this book equip the average reader with the methods scholars employ to interpret this historic book. The goal is that the reader will conclude at the end, “I too can read the Bible.”

Logos: How do you equip the reader to interpret the Bible?

Deppe: The book All Roads Lead to the Text functions as a template for model exegesis through an examination of:

  • grammar,
  • literary devices,
  • structure,
  • context,
  • historical and cultural background,
  • the history of interpretation, and
  • the exegete’s presuppositions for interpretation.

So really it is a book about exegetical methodology or hermeneutics.

What sets this volume apart from all others is the continuous use of biblical examples rather than an explanation of exegetical methods. Furthermore, I employ Logos Bible Software as I explore these biblical examples, so that students can perform their research more quickly and do not have to be close to a theological library.

All Roads Lead to the Text

Logos: You describe the book as a template for exegesis. How do you teach the process of exegesis?

Deppe: The best teaching methods employ memorable pictures. This volume compares the exegetical process to the use of various types of camera lenses so the reader perceives in a new way the importance of grammar, context, literary genre, historical background, structural analysis, and the history of interpretation.

Logos: Describe for us the flow of the book and the exegetical methods you employ.

Deppe: To fully understand the biblical text, we must place more than one lens on our exegetical camera.

The literary analysis of chapter one involves the employment of an infra-red lens to investigate what cannot always be seen in natural light. I demonstrate how the identification of unspecified genre and literary devices affect the final interpretation of a passage.

For grammatical exegesis in chapter two we employ an exegetical microscope which scrutinizes the details of a passage from words, to phrases, to clauses until we arrive at various translations of the text.

In chapter three we take a skeleton snapshot of the text so that we can envision the structure of the passage through developing a clausal outline.

Then, in chapter four, we avail ourselves of a wide-angled lens to probe the context before and after a particular pericope in chapter four.

In chapter five we utilize a telescopic lens and explore the world behind the text by inspecting the cultural and historical background.

Then, in chapter six, we roll out the motion picture exegetical camera in chapter seven to study the various periods of church history and to investigate how an examination of the major commentaries benefits our exegesis.

Next to last, chapter seven develops the finished photo through a theological analysis of the text and an exploration of the canonical meaning.

Finally, in chapter eight, we do not want to forget to explore the world in front of the text by an investigation of the reader’s presuppositions. We need to take an x-ray picture of ourselves so that we don’t subconsciously deceive ourselves and read our unexamined presuppositions into the text. Here I describe seven spiritual exercises and disciplines that enable us to apply the text to contemporary life.

These exegetical camera shots form a sample album of proofs that offer snapshots of the text from various angles. We discover that all roads lead to the text as the title of the book says.

Logos: What makes this book different from other books that interpret the Bible?

Deppe: What sets this volume apart from all others is the continuous use of biblical examples rather than an explanation of exegetical methods. Students and preachers want immediate application of theoretical methods. They want to know how a study of the grammar or structure of the text will make a difference. So in each chapter I include ten to twenty concrete examples of how the context or history of interpretation makes a difference in how you understand the Bible. Each description of a text consists of a couple of pages so the information is easily accessible yet sufficient in length to stimulate a good discussion.

Logos: Rarely does a volume include both scholarly exegesis along with a section on spiritual disciplines that will affect the reader in interpreting the text. What made you want to tackle these two together?

Deppe: The addition of a chapter on “Spiritual Exegesis” attempts to propose seven strategies in addition to the historical-critical method that affect interpretation and application. These spiritual disciplines include

  1. a practicing faith perspective,
  2. personalizing the text,
  3. praying Scripture,
  4. picturing concepts through meditation,
  5. listening prophetically,
  6. paradigm-building through mirroring, and
  7. imaginative application.

This x-ray of our personality, presuppositions, and spiritual makeup certifies that this whole process is not just an intellectual exercise completely separated from our life experience. Historical-critical exegesis stands at a crossroads where it must recognize and incorporate other methods into its field of vision. Our methods of interpretation must not only supply information but also personally form the reader, supply practical application, and connect the reader directly to God in deeper and more meaningful ways. That’s what I try to do in the last chapter.

Come back tomorrow for Part II of our discussion with Dean Deppe! And make sure to check out All Roads Lead to the Text: Eight Methods of Inquiry into the Bible for an opportunity to get it while it is still available at a great Pre-Pub discount.

Do you have favorite exegetical tips? Share them with us!

Thinking Green: Environmental Stewardship and the Psalms

Is it possible to be “Green” and be Christian? How should we interpret and put into practice Genesis 1:26? God created our planet, what is our responsiblity in maintaining it? Are there places in the Bible that speak about environmental stewardship? These are questions many Christians are asking themselves. And Arthur Walker-Jones, Associate Professor of Theology at the University of Winnipeg, believes the answers can be found in one of the most popular books of the Old Testament: the Psalms.

The Green Psalter: Resources for an Ecological Spirituality mines the Psalms with these very questions in mind. Walker-Jones explores the “Green” phenomenon in popular culture and current events—such as the movie An Inconvenient Truth and Hurricane Katrina—through a biblical lens, and discusses what role Christians might play in this global movement.  Walker-Jones makes his points with engaging prose and fresh and original insight on the Psalms. As one reviewer suggests, “he makes a convincing case the psalter is ‘greener’ than one might think” (Carol A. Newsom, Charles Howard Candler Professor of Old Testament, Emory University).

The Green Psalter is just one volume out of the eleven included in the Fortress Press Hebrew Bible Collection. Bringing together some of the top scholars on the Hebrew Bible, such as Walter Brueggemann and Marvin A. Sweeney, this collection will provide a solid foundation for study of the Hebrew Bible. And right now, you can pick it up for only $199.95 in Pre-Pub, a savings of almost 40%.

Don’t Miss William Mitchell Ramsay on Community Pricing!

Plug the name “W. M. Ramsay” into your Logos search bar, and watch how many hits come up in your library. At the turn of the 20th century, this archeologist travelled to the holy lands to disprove the history of the Bible—and guess what? The overwhelming evidence he found in favor of the Bible led to Ramsay’s conversion.

Ramsay spent over a dozen years living in, and writing about, the Bible lands. Now, over 100 years later, as you can see in your Logos search results, his research on Near Eastern culture and the Bible is still proving to be invaluable for scholars today.

Ramsay’s fascinating exploration into the history and places described in the Acts of the Apostles deepens our understanding of early Christianity. Ramsay’s work brings to life the cities that Paul travelled through, such as Galatia, Tarsus, and Iconium. It gives context and history for the places that Luke wrote about. You’ll gain a new perspective on the cities and churches referenced in John’s Revelation.

Having all sixteen volumes of the William Mitchell Ramsay Collection linked to your library and your Bible sounds pretty cool, right? What makes this collection even more exciting is that it is in Community Pricing, and getting close to crossing the 100% mark. Right now, the most you’ll pay is about $1.88 a book. The more people that bid on this collection, there’s good chance it’s going to get even cheaper. So make sure to place your bid today and take advantage of this amazing deal.

Have you been to the Holy Lands? Leave us a comment and tell us about your most memorable experience! If you haven’t, tell us which biblical site you would love to visit.

Removing the Veil: Revealing God’s Truth for Women

Beginning with Proverbs 31, author Margaret English began studying specific Scriptures regarding women. Ten years later, her journey into the Bible’s passages pertaining to women led her to write Removing the Veil: Revealing God’s Truth for Women. In Removing the Veil, English uses exegetical work to uncover God’s way for men and women to serve as leaders in the church and in society. By exploring women’s roles in the Church, English celebrates women’s gifts and callings and then encourages them to go out and use them. Removing the Veil is divided into three sections:

  1. Unveiling Our History
  2. Unveiling Our Hearts
  3. Unveiling Our Hope

What others are saying:

A quiet revolution is taking place today as more and more women realize who Jesus destined them to be. Removing the Veil is a part of this revolution. Those who study the biblical truths outlined in this well-researched book will find true freedom from the cultural and religious mindset that have kept so many women in spiritual bondage. —J. Lee Grady, author of 10 Lies the Church Tells Women

. . . This thoughtful, passionate, and well-researched book offers tremendous insight into this critical leadership consideration. —Samuel S. Hemby, Ph. D., Southeastern University

In writing Removing the Veil, Margaret English has validated every woman active in Christian ministry and every woman called to it. Through her historical study and her exposition of biblical passages, she clearly shows that God’s design from the beginning has been for men and women to work side by side to advance His kingdom, and that God did not set limitations on what roles women could play in accomplishing this work. . . —Maureen D. Eha, Features Editor, Charisma magazine

So grab Removing the Veil while it’s on Pre-Pub for $10.95 and join English on her ten-year journey into the heart of biblical womanhood.

Do you have favorite resources on the role of women in the church? Leave us a comment and tell us about it!

Nearly 1,500 Free Perseus Books for Logos 4

NOTE: When this post went live the resource count for the Perseus works came to more than 3,000 books. Initially we treated every day of the the Richmond newspaper as a separate book (just as Perseus had). We have made the decision to merge the Richmond items into one book which makes the Perseus count 1,100–1,500. It is still the same amount of content without 1,000+ one page books.

We’ve been keeping a secret. A big one. For the past few months, we’ve been working on making nearly 1,500 books from The Perseus Project accessible in Logos 4. And today we’re announcing that they’re available for pre-order.

The biggest secret? We’re going to release them for free.

There’s no catch. No strings attached. Just thousands of free books for use in Logos Bible Software 4.

What Is Perseus?

The Perseus Collections are focused primarily on Greek and Latin classics, like Aristotle and Plato. They also cover the history, literature, philosophy, and culture of the Greco-Roman world—important contextual sources for biblical scholars. Additionally, they contain other key works of Renaissance literature, and literature from early America. In short, Perseus is a library of the West’s most enduring and influential classics.

The Perseus books are available in the following 7 configurations:

  1. Perseus Classics Collection (1,114 vols.)
  2. Perseus Arabic Collection (37 vols.)
  3. Duke Databank of Documentary Papyri (257 vols.)
  4. Perseus Renaissance Collection (22 vols.)
  5. Perseus Civil War and 19th-Century American Collection (340 vols.)
  6. Beowulf
  7. Richmond Times-Dispatch (1,355 vols.)

Why Perseus Is So Valuable

With Perseus, you get a massive amount of valuable content. What makes this great is that it’s completely free. Imagine—imagine if we were to charge you even $1 for each of these books!

How You Can Get It

Because of the massive size of this project, the release has the potential to overwhelm our servers. We simply don’t have the capacity to deliver this much content all at once to all the users who want it, so we’ll be releasing it in stages on a first-come, first-served basis.

Here Is How Perseus Will Be Released

  1. We’re taking pre-orders. By placing a Pre-Pub order, you can reserve your spot in line. Don’t worry, even though you’re placing an order, you won’t be charged anything.
  2. In a few weeks, when we’re ready to release, we will remove Perseus from our website altogether. It will go offline for a period of time while we process the orders, and it won’t be available to anyone. Depending on how many pre-orders we get, it could be offline for quite some time.
  3. Once all the pre-orders for all collections are processed, we’ll bring it back to Logos.com so more people can download and enjoy it.

Please note that The Perseus Collections require the latest version of Logos Bible Software 4.3.

The bottom line is that you need to place your Pre-Pub order early to get it first. Once we start processing pre-orders, it will be unavailable and disappear from the website. The key is to get your pre-order in before the window of time closes.

How Perseus Enhances Your Use of Logos

Even if you’re not a Greek or Latin scholar, The Perseus Collections can still enhance your use of Logos.

Many of the Greek and Latin classics come with one or more English translations. That makes many of these resources accessible to you even if you’re not a specialist, or you’re not proficient in the ancient languages. Many resources also have tagging in place, so you can link them together and read them side-by-side.

The Greek texts will be getting lemma tagging (we’re exploring morph tagging, too—but we can’t promise anything specific yet), which means they’ll enhance Bible Word Study reports. For example, if you’re doing a word study on a Greek word which occurs only once in the New Testament, your Bible Word Study report will draw in data from the wealth of other Greek texts in The Perseus Collections. You’ll get better results simply because the Bible Word Study report has more material to draw from.

Lexicons that cite these resources as source documents will be getting linked. (Most aren’t quite yet—but they will be in the future.) This means, for example, if BDAG cites a text from Aristotle, you can click the citation and the Perseus edition of Aristotle will open instantly to the exact location being referenced.

Spread the Word!

It’s rare that thousands of classic works are made available for free to anyone who wants them. It’s even more amazing when you consider that these aren’t just PDFs or text files. They’re Logos books, and they take advantage of many of the features and tools built into Logos Bible Software. So it’s hard to put into words how phenomenal this opportunity really is.

That’s why we’re asking you to help spread the word. There are people who may not hear about it—people who don’t read the blog, who don’t get the emails—who aren’t aware of what these resources can do in Logos Bible Software. These people need to know about it.

Here’s what you can do to help them find out:

While The Perseus Collections make up an amazing amount of valuable content, they aren’t for everyone. If you don’t read Classics and don’t study Greek and Latin texts, you may not want to download this content, especially if you have a slow internet connection or an older computer. Keep in mind that you’ll have bigger and more frequent downloads and more regular and longer indexing. If you’ll use it, it’s definitely worth it. If not, you might want to consider just helping to get the word to those who would really benefit from it.

If you’re pre-ordering it, what Perseus books are you most looking forward to using in Logos Bible Software? Leave us a comment and let us know!

Personal Book Builder: The Inside Scoop

The most anticipated tool for Logos Bible Software has been Personal Books tool. Originally called Personal Book Builder (PBB), the tool was created for Libronix (Logos version 3) so that users could create their own books. It had a few shortcomings in that it created resources that were not exactly like their Logos produced counterparts. But that model has changed. Personal Books now have all the functionality of any other resource produced by Logos except it is produced by you.

What’s It For?

Personal BooksIf you’ve ever wished there was a way to bring all of your seminary papers, excurses studies, position papers, even your graduating thesis on “Middle Eastern Soil Samples and Their Impact on the Imago Dei,” and whatever else you can imagine into Logos, so that you could search it, reference it, and use it along with all of the other thousands of resources Logos makes available; your answer is Personal Books.

How Do I Use It?

Using the Personal Books tool is amazingly simple.

  1. Create your masterpiece in Word or any word processor that can save in a .docx format
  2. Save the file and remember where you saved it
  3. In Logos, click Tools | Personal Books
  4. When the Personal Books pane opens, locate and click Add book
  5. Add the information like Title, Author, Copyright, and Description, then set the resource type, adjust the language, and even add a book graphic
  6. Then click Add file and navigate to your original document
  7. Once you’ve finished, click Build Book and Logos does the rest

From this point forward your book can be located in your Library, added to collections, searched, highlighted, and more, just like every other Logos resource. Congratulations you’ve been (self) published!

Is That It?

Logos’ Personal Books tool opens up an entire vista of possibilities. Personal Books can be just like Logos books with tagging, milestones, and more. As I write this, the finishing touches are being put on the Personal Books section of the Logos help file and will be available soon (if not already) to help guide you through the basics of what Personal Books can do. Already, the Logos user community has been building the Wiki page for Personal Books. Like every other aspect of Logos Bible Software, the user forums are often the best place to search for and find answers to your questions.

But Wait, There’s More!

Logos’ Personal Books tool is already growing and more is planned. One user has created a script to automatically create tags and hyperlinks between resources and another created a script to add page numbers! In the past, Logos 3 PBB required users to find ways to share their work. My own website hosts almost a thousand Logos 3 format PBB resources contributed by the community. Now however, Logos has plans to integrate directly with the Logos.com website so that your works can be made available around the globe if you want them to be.

Sweet! Where Do I Get It?

Logos’ Personal Books tool is the main component of Logos 4.3. By clicking the Help Button | About Logos Bible Software in your copy of Logos you’ll see what version of Logos you are currently using. If it’s not at least 4.3 you can simply wait for Logos to update itself or type the command “update now” in your command bar and let Logos Bible Software do the rest.

What are you most looking forward to adding to your Logos library or what excites you most about the Personal Books tool? Leave us a comment and let us know!

Today’s guest blogger is Thomas Black, a Logos Forum MVP and a Pastor in Moweaqua, Illinois.

Free Personal Book Builder Ships with New Logos 4 Update!

We are excited to announce that the completely redesigned Personal Book Builder has shipped with the new version (4.3) of Logos Bible Software. Like all previous updates, version 4.3 is a free download for all Logos 4 users.

Personal Book Builder

With this update, Personal Book Builder will be added to Logos 4 as a completely free feature. You will now be able to create your own fully tagged, fully searchable books in Logos. These resources can be marked up with your own notes and highlights, and you can add links to your other Logos resources.

Create Your Own Resources!

Personal Book Builder allows you to create your own powerful, feature rich books for Logos 4! These books will operate with much of the same functionality as your other Logos resources.

Just think of all the documents you can combine with your Logos library. You can add your sermons, Sunday school lessons, personal Bible studies, or journals. Teachers can upload their curriculum and students can add their papers, essays and theses. Virtually any work you have on a Word document (.docx) can be integrated into your Logos 4 resources. Did I mention this was free?

How Do You Get the Update?

Logos 4 Users

If you have automatic updating enabled (screenshot), which is the default setting, Logos 4 should notify you that updates are ready to be installed. When you see the balloon tooltip window, right-click on the Logos icon in your system tray and choose to “Install update” (screenshot). If Logos 4 hasn’t downloaded the update by the end of the day, type Update Now into the Command Bar (screenshot). This will force Logos 4 to check for any available updates (screenshot) and begin downloading them.

Need to Upgrade to Logos 4?

If you are using a previous version of Logos Bible Software and waiting for that perfect time to upgrade to Logos 4, this is it! Not only do you get the newest version of Logos 4 including the Personal Book Builder, you will receive:

  • Up to hundreds of new books for pennies on the dollar
  • 100+ powerful new tools, features, databases, and more
  • Access to your library on your PC, Mac, iPhone, iPad, Android device, and Biblia.com
  • An interest-free payment plan option for up to twelve monthly payments

Visit our customized upgrader to find out what discounts you qualify for.

New to Logos?

If you have not made the leap to Logos, what are you waiting for? There are a number of enthusiastic users who would love to tell you how much you will benefit from Logos Bible Software. Purchase a base package today and see how Logos 4′s incredible features can dramatically improve your Bible study.

What’s New in Logos 4.3?

Version 4.3 brings a number of important new features—many of which are in direct response to your requests. Here are the major ones:

  • Personal Book Builder
  • Resource Justification and Hyphenation—Full justification of resource text, with hyphenation, can be enabled/disabled in Program Settings. The default setting is Enabled.
  • Exegetical Guide—The default “Parts of Speech” setting in the “Word by Word” section is now “Include only these parts of speech” with only Verbs, Nouns, Adjectives and Adverbs selected.” Other parts of speech will be displayed, but will be grayed out. Clicking on a grayed-out word will generate data and navigate to the result.

There were also some nice little improvements made to resources, notes, searches, sentence diagramming, and syncing.

There are also some new features available for Mac users including updates to notes, keyboard shortcuts, and setup.

Check out “What’s New in Logos 4.3” to see a complete list of the changes.

Leave us a comment and tell us what you plan to add to your Logos 4 library with the Personal Book Builder!

Sacra Doctrina: Postmodern Theology

Many of the world’s technological advances have helped to make the world a smaller, more intimate place. From the lateen sail and the internal combustion engine to the printing press and the World Wide Web,  the speed which people and ideas travel around the globe is increasing rapidly.

Although this is a great advantage for the Gospel, it comes with challenging questions as well. How do we maintain an attitude of respect toward other religious viewpoints without compromising our commitment and beliefs in the Christian faith? What is a healthy middle ground between the polar extremes of pluralism and exclusivism?

These are just a couple of the questions that S. Mark Heim attempts to tackle in his award-winning book The Depth of the Riches. In this winner of the Theologos Award for Best Academic Book in 2001 from the Association of Theological Booksellers, Heim looks closely at, not only the paths of various religions, but also their salvific ends.

Retired professor Emeritus of World Christianity at the Candler School of Theology, Emory University, Dr. M. Thangaraj said this about The Depth of the Riches,

“How do I maintain an attitude of respect for and reverence toward other religions without compromising my strong commitment to the Christian faith? Christians cannot but struggle with this  question in today’s setting of religious pluralism. S. Mark Heim assists us in this struggle by offering a clear analysis of the grammar of religious diversity and a creative exposition of the doctrine of the Trinity. This book presents ‘a meditation on the Trinity,’ one that celebrates both the unique act of salvation in Jesus the Christ and the trinitarian plenitute that houses a variety of religious ends. Heim writes in such a way that, while reading his book, we can think, argue, and pray—all at the same time.”

The Depth of the Riches is only one of the six books in the Sacra Doctrina: Christian Theology for a Postmodern Age Series, a collection dedicated to applying Christian tradition and Scripture to the new challenges in our postmodern context.

In the Sacra Doctrina: Christian Theology for a Postmodern Age Series you will find timely discussions on such important topics as ecological theology, the church as a reflection of the Trinity, a theological look at human personhood, and more. This collection deals with postmodern concerns both theologically and academically without being entirely unapproachable, and right now it is on Pre-Pub at nearly 50% off the retail price!

Get in early and take advantage of our special Pre-Pub pricing for this exceptional collection.

Is there a title you find particularly interesting in this collection? Leave us a comment!

 

Why Christian History Matters

I’m a historian and a Christian. In fact, it was my study of history that led to my conversion. I realize this is an unusual progression, and perhaps it is a bias that leads me to believe that the common neglect of history among Christians is lamentable. But bias or no, the neglect is real, and I think I understand it: if our destiny is in eternity, and if Christ is immediate to each of us, of what ultimate significance is the past? Isn’t our relentless quest for the early church or the original manuscripts an implicit repudiation of history?

The value of historical knowledge, then, seems to be simply a matter of being articulate, of being well-read, or of being capable of apologetics. Or else, it has value as an antiquarian hobby—some find history interesting in the same sort of way that others find stamps interesting. If this is the case, surely history is at best ancillary to our Christianity.

But, I think this line of reasoning is mistaken. Rather, I would argue that the connection between history and Christianity is essential. Because the Incarnation was nothing less than the entry of God Himself into the stream of human history, it affirms the reality and value of the lived human experience. The Second Person of the Trinity affects our salvation not as an abstraction, but as a human life. In becoming a son, a friend, a teacher, in speaking our language and mourning our dead, God affirmed the temporal and social reality of our being. In entering our history at a specific time, in continuity with a meaningful past, and proclaiming a future of consummation, Christ repudiated the classical understanding of cyclical and ultimately meaningless history and codified the Jewish understanding of history as the story of God and His people, a story with a beginning and an end. Christianity has temporality in its essence.

With this in mind, the Christian ought to read all history as salvation history, and understand Christianity itself as having duration. It seems to me that a description of Christ that does not include his birth and childhood, while not necessarily wrong, is certainly incomplete; and, likewise, an understanding of Christianity that does not include its history.

And so, we must study history. From the Apostolic Fathers to the Reformation, from the ancient world, through the medieval, and into modernity, with Logos you can make a serious study of church history. We have large, comprehensive collections, such as the Calvin and the History of Calvinism Collection or the Philip Schaff Collection that allow you to dig deep into a historical topic, and we also have shorter histories written by prominent historians that will allow you to brush up on your historical knowledge, such as Church History in Plain Language or our Studies in the Reformation.

History is most profoundly understood, though, through the study of primary sources, such as those found in the A New Eusebius: Documents Illustrating the History of the Church to AD 337, or the Works of the Venerable Bede, and Logos has a massive library of such texts. Whether you want to study the ancient Jews  or the church as it enters the post-modern age, Logos has the resources. If you are unsure where to begin, try browsing Logos products by history products and see what piques your interest.

What are your favorite texts for studying Christian history? Leave us a comment and let us know.