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New Testament Reverse Interlinear Available for the NIV 2011

We have wrapped up work on the reverse interlinear for the NIV 2011 New Testament. If you have Logos 4 installed, a license for the NIV 2011 with reverse interlinears, and are set up to receive updates, the update should be automatic. The reverse interlinear for the NIV2011 Old Testament is well under way, we hope to release that later this year.

Growing up as a child of the late 70′s and early 80′s, the standard Bible in my church and home was the NIV. But I have to admit, I am less familiar with the TNIV and the NIV2011, so I was actually happy to work on this reverse interlinear project.

There has been both support and criticism for the NIV 2011, particularly as it handles what have come to be known as gender issues. I won’t comment on those, but I thought I’d highlight a few of the other changes between the 1984 NIV and the 2011 NIV.

Change 1: Is it “Christ” or “Messiah”?

The 1984 NIV used “Christ” to translate the Greek Χριστος (Christos) almost exclusively. There’s nothing wrong with that. But one refreshing change I noticed is that when Χριστος is used referring to the prophesied savior to come (mostly in the Gospels), the 2011 NIV uses “Messiah” instead of “Christ”. Elsewhere, where a particular person, Jesus, is referred to using Χριστος, the 2011 NIV uses “Christ” (or “Jesus Christ” or “Christ Jesus” as the Greek text warrants).

This is a refreshing change. I think sometimes we slip into thinking that “Christ” is Jesus’ last name, and this change helps us remember that in the Gospels it is a title referring to the Savior to come.

Change 2: Is it “Saints” or “Holy Ones”?

I was less excited about this change, but can understand why the committee made it. This typically shows up in the epistles. I think the change is primarily about focusing on the effect of Christ on someone (made holy) versus focusing on some sort of status ascribed to a person as a result of that effect. The use of “saint” today is different than it was in the 1970′s and 80′s when the NIV was originally translated, so some sort of change is defensible, though it wreaks havoc with the way I remember and have internalized the text since my younger days.

These are just a few of the larger, consistent changes between the 1984 and 2011 editions of the NIV. There were scads of smaller changes, as well. If you’re really interested in those sorts of details, and you have the 1984 NIV available in Logos, you can use Logos 4′s Bible Comparison features (Morris Proctor talks about it briefly here) to tease out all of the differences—even punctuation, which is sometimes very interesting!

If you don’t have NIV 2011, you can pick yours up today!

Has the NIV been beneficial to your Bible study? Leave us a comment and tell us how!

The NIV Application Commentary: Old Testament Is Now on Pre-Pub!

Logos has had the 20-volume NIV Application Commentary: New Testament available for some time, but you may not know that the 12-volume NIV Application Commentary: Old Testament is now available on Pre-Pub as well! The demand for this collection is high and it’s already under development, so time is of the essence to pick up the Old Testament collection at a discounted price.

The NIV Application Commentary is unlike any other commentary series. Not content to simply focus on application of the biblical text, this series takes the original meaning of the text and mines it for its contemporary significance. It would be a mistake to see the NIV Application Commentary as simple devotional literature. The ultimate goal of this series may be application, but that doesn’t stop these commentaries from being credible reference materials.

The Application Commentary: Old Testament series includes insights from such notable scholars as John H. WaltonRobert L. Hubbard, Jr.Andrew E. Hill, and Karen H. Jobes. Each author in the NIV Application Commentary breaks their exegesis into:

  • Original Meaning: This section helps you grasp the author’s intended meaning by looking at the biblical passage’s historical, literary, and cultural context.
  • Bridging Contexts: In this section, the commentary wrestles with discerning the historical aspects of the passage which have direct twenty-first century correlations—and those which do not. This section focuses on drawing out both explicit and implicit parallels.
  • Contemporary Significance: By looking at contemporary issues and contexts, the authors of the NIV Application Commentaries confront modern readers with ideas and principles as powerful and challenging as the Scriptures would have been to its original audience.
Here is what people are saying about the series (check out the product page to see even more endorsements):

The NIV Application Commentary series doesn’t fool around. It gets right down to business, bringing this ancient and powerful Word of God into the present so that it can be heard and delivered with all the freshness of a new day, with all the immediacy of a friend’s embrace.
Eugene H. Peterson

It is encouraging to find a commentary that is not only biblically trustworthy but also contemporary in its application. The NIV Application Commentary will prove to be a helpful tool in the pastor’s sermon preparation. I use it and recommend it.
Charles F. Stanley, pastor, First Baptist Church of Atlanta

The NIV Application Commentary series promises to be of very great service to all who preach and teach the Word of God.
J. I. Packer, Regent College

The NIV Application Commentaries add unique value to your library. If you are looking for ancient wisdom and modern relevance, pre-order the NIV Application Commentary: Old Testament while it’s still on Pre-Pub.

Under Development: The Complete Works of Stephen Charnock

The Complete Works of Stephen Charnock (5 vols.) is currently under development, but you can pick it up while it’s still at the Pre-Pub price of just $69.95—that’s 70% off the retail price. These five volumes contain 64 theological discourses from Charnock including his most well-known work, The Existence and Attributes of God.

Enjoyed for hundreds of years, The Existence and Attributes of God is comprised of sermons Charnock delivered at Crosby Hall, London. Charnock died in 1680 while delivering this series of discourses which explore God’s traits and characteristics in both the Old and New Testament. Many believe these sermons epitomize the excellent and holy character Charnock developed in his 53 years.

In addition, several of Charnock’s other discourses address topics like church stability, obedience, the Lord ’s Supper, and so much more.

Here’s what the Evangelical Witness and Presbyterian Review said about Stephen Charnock and his writings:

The place of Stephen Charnock among theologians has long been definite and distinguished. . . . massive, substantial, and thorough, [Charnock’s works] well represent the religious thinking and character of the man.

Be sure to pick up The Complete Works of Stephen Charnock for the Pre-Pub price of $69.95 before it ships!

Get a Free Resource for Washington’s Birthday

Today Logos joins the rest of the United States in celebrating Washington’s Birthday (don’t worry, the sales team will still be here to take your orders!). You can celebrate with us by downloading a free copy of Inaugural Addresses of the Presidents of the United States. But hurry, it will only be available until midnight on Tuesday, February 21!

The Background of Washington’s Birthday

Americans have celebrated George Washington’s birthday long before it was declared a national holiday. It wasn’t until 1879 that February 22, became a national legal holiday (one of only 11 permanent holidays established by Congress). In 1968, Congress passed the Monday Holidays act which moved the celebration of Washington’s birthday from February 22 to the third Monday in February.

While there have been many attempts to change the name of the holiday to Presidents’ Day in honor of both Washington and Abraham Lincoln (whose birthday falls on February 12), this proposal has always been rejected by Congress. Contrary to popular belief, the holiday is still Washington’s Birthday.

Since 1862, George Washington’s Farewell Address has traditionally been read in the United States Senate. This document includes the following profound statement:

“Of all the dispositions and habits which lead to political prosperity, religion and morality are indispensable supports. In vain would that man claim the tribute of patriotism, who should labor to subvert these great pillars of human happiness, these firmest props of the duties of men and citizens. The mere politician, equally with the pious man, ought to respect and to cherish them. A volume could not trace all their connections with private and public felicity. Let it simply be asked: Where is the security for property, for reputation, for life, if the sense of religious obligation desert the oaths which are the instruments of investigation in courts of justice? And let us with caution indulge the supposition that morality can be maintained without religion. Whatever may be conceded to the influence of refined education on minds of peculiar structure, reason and experience both forbid us to expect that national morality can prevail in exclusion of religious principle.”

Check Out These Deals!

We have also discounted some other political and patriotic titles. Check deals on these titles:

Don’t miss an opportunity to add these resources to your library. They go back to their regular prices at midnight on Tuesday, February 21.

If you want to browse similar titles, you can do a faceted search under the topic Politics & Government. Faceted browsing is a great way to find materials you may have missed.

So download your free copy of Inaugural Addresses of the Presidents of the United States today, check out some of the other deals we have available, and have a happy Washington’s Birthday!

63 Bestselling Zondervan Books on Pre-Pub: What You Need to Know

Now you can get 63 new Zondervan books available at some of the best prices anywhere—digital or print: Books like Michael Horton’s The Christian Faith, a dozen new volumes in the NIV Application Commentary, and a lot more are available for pre-order in a discounted 63-volume bundle and a dozen smaller collections.

It’s a ton of content, so here’s a quick look at some of the highlights:

New Releases and Bestsellers

Michael Horton’s The Christian Faith has been one of the most-requested books in the last few months. This book is Horton’s long-anticipated systematic theology. It also received a 2011 Christianity Today Book Award, and has received praise in journal reviews and on prominent blogs.

You’ll also get Michael Williams’ new book, How to Read the Bible through the Jesus Lens, which Justin Taylor called “the sort of book I’d love to have in the hands of every member of my church!” If you enjoyed Fee and Stuart’s How to Read the Bible for All Its Worth, then Williams’ book is right up your alley.

The bundle contains lots of other bestsellers, like Scot McKnight’s The King Jesus Gospel and The Blue Parakeet, Andreas Köstenberger’s Theology of John’s Gospel and Letters, Carl Rasmussen’s recently updated Zondervan Atlas of the Bible, Gregg Allison’s Historical Theology, and dozens more.

Commentaries

We’ve made 12 additional volumes in the NIV Application Commentary available for Logos users. In fact, this is the first time these volumes have been available anywhere in a high-quality digital format. So if you already own the commentaries on the New Testament and the Prophets, this is the perfect chance to round out your set.

The bundle contains lots of other commentaries, too, like the newest volumes in the Zondervan Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament series by Thomas Schreiner and Clinton E. Arnold, and a new commentary on Revelation by Chuck Swindoll.

Bible Dictionaries and Reference Works

You’ll also get Moises Silva’s Essential Companion to Life in Bible Times and The Essential Bible Dictionary, as well as The Essential Bible Companion to the Psalms, by Brian Webster and David Beach.

This is just a quick summary—there are more than 63 volumes altogether. Check out the product page to see the full booklist.

An Incredible Value!

If you were to get all these books in print, you would pay $1,674.37, and even if you searched the web and found the best deals, you would still pay well over $1,000.00. For a limited time, you can get all these books for around $899.95 on Pre-Pub, which works out to around $14 per volume.

This pricing is available for a very limited time. We’re already working on these books, and we expect to ship them soon. After we ship, the price will jump, so the window of time to get this discount is quickly closing. Pre-order now!

Not quite ready to spring for the whole bundle? Then choose from a dozen smaller collections:

The main thing to remember is that all these prices will go up very soon, so pre-order today!

The LEB Old Testament Is Now Available

We introduced the Lexham English Bible (LEB) with a blog post in March, 2010. Initially,  only the New Testament was available. We are happy to announce that the entire Old Testament is now complete!

The LEB is a new translation that complements your primary translation. It doesn’t matter whether you use the ESV, NIV, KJV, or any other English translation, the LEB will help you to identify things like difficult texts, idiomatic phrases, and grammatical issues. When you couple the LEB with your principal translation, you will gain a better understanding of the Bible in English. Visit the Lexham English Bible page for information regarding this new translation.

Download It Now!

If you already have the Lexham English Bible as part of your Logos 4 resources, you will be receiving an update with the LEB Old Testament. If you don’t own a Logos 4 base package, you can download the LEB individually for free for Logos 4 or for older versions of Logos. From the product page, click “Add to Cart” (make sure you’re logged in) and proceed through checkout. Our checkout process currently requires credit card information, but we promise you won’t be charged.

9 New Ways to Save with Community Pricing

Logos has recently moved some very important resources from Pre-Pub to Community Pricing. This is an incredible opportunity for Logos users!

Community Pricing is one of the most popular ways to grow your library at remarkably low prices. Check out the following resources that have just moved to Community Pricing:

  1. The Works of David Clarkson (3 vols.)
  2. Dictionary of the Targumim, the Talmud Babli and Yerushalmi, and the Midrashic Literature (2 vols.)
  3. The Sacred Books of the East (50 vols.)
  4. The Works of Adam Clarke (24 vols.)
  5. The Works of the Reverend John Fletcher (6 vols.)
  6. The Collected Writings of John Nelson Darby (47 vols.)
  7. The Works of Andrew Gray 
  8. Patrologia Cursus Completus, Series Graeca, Part 1 (vols. 1–18)
  9. Oxyrhynchus Papyri (vols. 1–15)

Each of these works lingered on Pre-Pub for over a year (some even longer!), but you have an opportunity to pick them up now at a fraction of the Pre-Pub price! So head over to the Community Pricing page and place your bid!

What’s the best deal you’ve found on Community Pricing? Leave us a comment and tell us about it!

Reading the Bible Theologically

Since the dawn of the Enlightenment, biblical scholarship has grown increasingly skeptical and specialized. Scholars isolate individual books of the Bible from the rest of the canon, becoming experts in Matthew, Isaiah, or Genesis, rather than Scripture as a whole.

But is this how Jesus and the apostles read the Scriptures?

Taking a cue from the New Testament and such prominent theologians as Augustine, Calvin, and Luther, the Brazos Theological Commentary on the Bible (16 vols.) starts with the premise that the Bible is Christian Scripture. Affirming its divine inspiration and human authorship, each book is interpreted theologically by identifying its place within the canon and how it illuminates the gospel of Jesus Christ. While attention is given to historical and literary context, the primary focus is on each book’s major themes and theological contributions. Like the writers of the New Testament before them, the Brazos commentators are not satisfied with only understanding a book in its own right but also relating it to the redemptive work of the Messiah.

Brazos also frequently interacts with influential interpreters from throughout church history. For example, Robert W. Jenson’s commentary on Ezekiel includes contributions from Origen and Pope Gregory the Great. Likewise, Stanley Hauerwas’ commentary on Matthew draws from Augustine, Barth, and Bonhoeffer. This approach recognizes the Spirit’s work in illuminating the Word to the church throughout the ages, giving proper respect to the voices of those who have come before.

This commentary series is especially helpful for pastors, as it provides the canonical context for each book of the Bible and draws connections between the Old Testament and the New. This frees up pastors to spend more time exegeting individual texts and less time analyzing entire books.

The Brazos Theological Commentary (16 vols.) is an important step forward in scholarship, taking the best in modern hermeneutics and combining it with the theological methodology of the New Testament and early church fathers. And for a limited time, it’s on Pre-Pub for 40% off the retail price. Pick it up today and learn how a theological approach brings rich, new insight into studying the Bible.

Patristic Commentaries on Pre-Pub

Today’s post is by Louis St. Hilaire, Content Manager of our Electronic Text Development department.

If you’re interested in the preaching and exegesis of the fathers of the church, there are three important collections available for pre-order that you should know about.

The Works of St. Cyril of Alexandria makes an excellent complement to the Early Church Fathers collection. Cyril was central to the Christological controversies of the fourth and fifth centuries and was well regarded in later centuries, but is oddly neglected in the Nicene and Post-Nicene Fathers. This collection closes the historical gap with letters and writings related to Cyril’s controversy with Nestorius, but, just as importantly, it includes Cyril’s massive commentaries on Luke and John.

Very few patristic commentaries on Luke have survived, so Cyril’s commentary on Luke is an important witness to the interpretation of this Gospel in the first millennium. Aside from a few sermons of Augustine, it will be the first from this era to be available for Logos.

John was much more commonly preached and commented on, so the Early Church Fathers already has commentary or homilies on John from Origen, Augustine and John Chrysostom. Adding Cyril’s commentary to this lets you see the development of the Alexandrian tradition of interpretation from Origen to Cyril, or compare, side by side, this tradition in Cyril with those of Antioch and the Latin West represented by Chrysostom and Augustine respectively.

Theodore of Mopsuestia’s Commentary on the Minor Pauline Epistles brings to Logos for the first time the writings of the man who was, in many ways, the mind opposite Cyril’s in the Christological controversies and theological and exegetical rivalry between Alexandria and Antioch. While it’s now acknowledged that the contrast between Alexandrian allegory and Antiochene literalism is not quite as sharp as was once thought, Theodore is perhaps the most typical and famous representative of the Antiochene tradition, and his comments onGalatians 4:21-31 contain an important polemic against the allegorists.

The Medieval Preaching and Spirituality Collection also includes writings of several later writers from the patristic era, including John Damascene, Boethius, and Gregory the Great. Important among these is Gregory the Great’s Morals on the Book of Job. The interpretation of the Old Testament was a pressing problem for the early church, as it engaged in controversies with Gnosticism, Judaism, and pagan critics. Gregory stands near the end of this era, as an heir to the exegetical methods pioneered and developed by men like Irenaeus, Origen, and Augustine, and his commentary on Job formed an important bridge from his own era to later centuries. It was incredibly influential in the Middle Ages, being cited hundreds of times in the Summa Theologica of Thomas Aquinas.

If you’re interested in learning more about the biblical interpretation of the church fathers, take a look at Manlio Simonetti’s Biblical Interpretation in the Early Church or the Historical Interpreter’s Collection.

Helping You Make Sense of the Old Testament

Let’s face it. The Old Testament can be hard to read sometimes. We’re separated by thousands of years and thousands of miles (at least if you’re at our headquarters in Bellingham, Washington). There are difficult-to-pronounce names, complicated rituals, and cultural assumptions very different from our own.

The Handbook on the Old Testament Series is an attempt to summarize and introduce you to every chapter of every book in the Old Testament. It’s part commentary, part textbook, part historical background, and part comprehensive introduction. In other words, it’s the perfect place to start if you’re looking for a solid introduction to the Old Testament.

These handbooks summarize the key issues of each chapter in the Old Testament, provide exposition of the text, and interact with recent commentaries and studies. So if you’re working on a sermon, or writing a paper, these books can help guide you through the vast scholarship on the Old Testament, and help you identify key themes on the text you’re studying. You’ll also get historical background, an introduction to the cultural context, helpful bibliographies of recent research, and lots more.

In the preface to the volume on the Pentateuch, Victor P. Hamilton writes:

As I wrote this book, I had in mind the student not only as a scholar of God’s Word, but also as a proclaimer of God’s Word. Therefore, I have attempted to write something that is as usable in the pastor’s study as it is in the classroom, something that is as devotional as it is scholarly.

These books have gone through multiple print editions and sold tens of thousands of copies in print. Now, we’re pleased to make them available for pre-order at a discounted price. You would normally pay more than $100.00 for these four volumes, even if you searched around and found them on sale. Right now you can get the entire set on Pre-Pub for less than $85. This price will be going up soon, so make sure you pre-order now before it’s too late!