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Get a Free Latin Dictionary

Today’s guest post is by Louis St. Hilaire, Content Manager of our Electronic Text Development Department.

Logos really shines when it comes to the study of biblical Greek and Hebrew, but we’re building an impressive library of Latin texts as well, including the Vulgate, important  medieval and Reformation theology texts, and hundreds of Latin titles in the Perseus Classics Collection.

Now we’ve created a tool that makes all these texts easier to use in Logos. The Dictionary of Latin Forms allows you to look up hundreds of thousands of Latin word forms from the famous WORDS Latin-English Dictionary program. This means that you can instantly look up meanings for most words in these texts—not to mention Latin terms used in English texts—just by double-clicking or opening the Information window.

The best part is that you can add this powerful tool to your Logos library for free!

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You can also get a great price on Lewis & Short’s Latin Dictionary now on Community Pricing. The free Dictionary of Latin Forms is a handy study aid to get you quickly to a definition and lemma for a word, but Lewis & Short is an expansive dictionary that takes you in-depth with ample examples of usages from classical, Patristic and medieval texts. Even today, more than a hundred years after its publication, it is still consulted, particularly for  medieval and Ecclesiastical Latin.

These two resources will make it even easier to study Latin texts in Logos, so place your bid now to help put Lewis & Short’s Latin Dictionary into production.

Improve Your Biblical Language Studies

Biblical Languages: Reference Grammars and Introductions (19 vols.)Logos has always strived to offer the best in original language texts and tools, and the Biblical Languages: Reference Grammars and Introductions (19 vols.) is no exception. This collection contains 19 volumes of technical reference material from notable philologists, lexicographers, and grammarians from the late 19th and early 20th centuries. This time period represents a golden age for the study of biblical languages, and the Biblical Languages: Reference Grammars and Introductions (19 vols.) contains many of these important works.

Some of these titles include Westcott and Hort’s Introduction to the New Testament in the Original Greek, Thackeray’s Grammar of the Old Testament in Greek: According to the Septuagint, Swete’s Introduction to the Old Testament in Greek, and Smyth’s A Greek Grammar for Colleges.

With the Logos edition, you get all 19 volumes for the incredible price of $249.95; that is a saving of almost 70%! If you want to broaden your understanding of biblical languages and learn from some of the most gifted scholars, then grab Biblical Languages: Reference Grammars and Introductions while it’s still on Pre-Pub.

The Zondervan Counterpoints Collection: A Charitable Discourse

In necessariis unitas, in dubiis libertas, in omnibus caritas” (In necessary things unity; in uncertain things freedom; in everything compassion.)—Marco Antonio de Dominis

Doctrine matters; there’s no question about it. And yet, we live with the tension of standing firm on the things we believe while other educated and sincere believers interpret and apply Scripture differently. Is it possible to have a serious discussion without the conversation becoming contentious? The Zondervan Counterpoints Collection, currently on Pre-Pub, would say yes.

The Zondervan Counterpoint Collection exposes readers to perspectives written by contributors who affirm the inspiration and authority of Scripture yet vary in their judgment on a number of hot topics.

Each volume features essays on theological topics from a variety of scholars. Many essays are followed up by direct respectful responses/rebuttals from the other contributors. You can also find bibliographies and suggestions for further reading on many of the perspectives discussed.

The Zondervan Counterpoints Collection Upgrade features 3 volumes:

Four Views on Divine Providence

Three Views on the New Testament Use of the Old Testament

  • Single Meaning, Unified Referents: Accurate and Authoritative Citations of the Old Testament by the New Testament—Walter C. Kaiser Jr.
  • Single Meaning, Multiple Contexts and Referents: The New Testament’s Legitimate, Accurate, and Multifaceted Use of the Old—Darrell L. Bock
  • Fuller Meaning, Single Goal: A Christotelic Approach to the New Testament Use of the Old in Its First-Century Interpretive Environment—Peter Enns

Four Views on the Spectrum of Evangelicalism

The Zondervan Counterpoints Collection Upgrade augments the Zondervan Counterpoints Collection. In the 14-volume Zondervan Counterpoints Collection, you’ll find varied perspectives on topics like baptism, Revelation, eternal security,  and church growth. Contributors include Douglas MooJohn F. WalvoordNorman L. Geisler, and Craig S. Keener.

Pick up the Zondervan Counterpoints Collection Upgrade (3 vols.) on Pre-Pub today and strengthen your grasp of differing evangelical views and traditions. And don’t forget to check out the thought-provoking volumes in the 14-volume Zondervan Counterpoints Collection!

Powerful Resources for Old Testament Studies

Yesterday we looked at the  Old Testament Hermeneutics Collection, an 18-volume selection of academic writings—currently on Pre-Pub. If you are still in the market for Old Testament resources, check out the Fortress Press Hebrew Bible Collection (also on Pre-Pub).

The Fortress Press Hebrew Bible Collection’s 11 volumes affirm the importance of the Old Testament for today’s believer. If you’re looking for scholarly works to help you understand and communicate the unique character of the Hebrew Bible, this collection is right for you.

Take, for example, The Word Militant: Preaching a Decentering Word. This collection of essays from Columbia Theological Seminary’s Professor of Old Testament Walter Brueggemann honors the Old Testament’s destabilizing—and often contentious—nature.

The Word Militant is broken down into eleven chapters:

  1. Preaching as Reimagination
  2. The Preacher, the Text, and the People
  3. Ancient Utterance and Contemporary Hearing
  4. An Imaginative “Or”
  5. That the World May Be Redescribed
  6. The Social Nature of the Biblical Text for Preaching
  7. The Shrill Voice of the Wounded Party
  8. Life or Death: De-Privileged Communication
  9. Preaching to Exiles
  10. Preaching a Sub-Version
  11. Truth-Telling as Subversive Obedience

You might think from these chapter titles that the primary audience for Brueggeman’s essays is the expositor, but The Word Militant is as much a work on hermeneutics as it is a study on homiletics. Readers are challenged by the subversive and nonlinear nature of the Old Testament and encouraged to embrace its confrontational character.

This is only 1 of the 11 books available in this collection. You will also get an introduction to the Hebrew Bible, a history of Ancient Israel (including an in-depth look at the cultural backgrounds that influenced the Hebrew people and Scriptures), a theological discussion on the Holocaust, and a whole lot more.

This collection is under development now, so it won’t be on Pre-Pub long. You can still pick these up on Pre-Pub, but the window of opportunity is closing! Act now and add these powerful resources your Old Testament studies.

What Old Testament resource do you use the most? Leave us a comment and tell us about them!

Free for March: Martyn Lloyd-Jones’ Authentic Christianity

Authentic Christianity is March’s Free Book of the Month!

Martyn Lloyd-Jones, who died 31 years ago today (March 1), has been called “the finest biblical expositor of the twentieth century” by John MacArthur, and “one of the titanic figures of twentieth-century Christianity” by Al Mohler. Martyn Lloyd-Jones’ “logic on fire” preaching style has inspired many of today’s leading expositors.

Compiled from a series of messages preached during the peak of his ministry, Authentic Christianity features D. Martyn Lloyd-Jones’ comparison between modern Christianity and the early church. Here, Lloyd-Jones encourages readers to embrace the courage and faith of first-century Christians.

Don’t miss the opportunity to add this amazing volume to your library for free. Visit the Free Book of the Month page to download your copy today and enter for a chance to win the 10-volume Selected Works of Martyn Lloyd-Jones!

Save 80% on the Old Testament Hermeneutics Collection

The 18-volume Old Testament Hermeneutics Collection features comprehensive discussion on interpretive and literary criticism from international experts.

Biblical scholars from universities in Italy, Australia, Guatemala, England, Amsterdam, and the United States cover a broad tapestry of issues related to hermeneutics—issues like:

Many of the volumes in the Old Testament Hermeneutics Collection are in honor of influential biblical scholars. Gift of God in Due Season pays tribute to American Old Testament scholar and Dead Sea Scroll editor James W. Sanders, Sense and Sensitivity is written to memorialize Glasgow University Professor of Hebrew Bible and Semitic Studies Robert Carroll, and In Search of Wisdom is written in honor of Ronald E. Clements, Samuel Davidson professor of Old Testament at Kings College University of London. Other volumes written to honor biblical scholars include:

The Pre-Pub price for this collection offers you an incredible savings. Many of the volumes in this collection fetch prices well above $150. At Logos, pre-orders for this collection are only $199.95 (a savings of $800), and you get these titles tagged and working in tandem with the rest of your library.

If you’re looking for deep, penetrating studies on Old Testament interpretation, the Old Testament Hermeneutics Collection will be a valuable addition—at an astonishing value.

New Testament Reverse Interlinear Available for the NIV 2011

We have wrapped up work on the reverse interlinear for the NIV 2011 New Testament. If you have Logos 4 installed, a license for the NIV 2011 with reverse interlinears, and are set up to receive updates, the update should be automatic. The reverse interlinear for the NIV2011 Old Testament is well under way, we hope to release that later this year.

Growing up as a child of the late 70′s and early 80′s, the standard Bible in my church and home was the NIV. But I have to admit, I am less familiar with the TNIV and the NIV2011, so I was actually happy to work on this reverse interlinear project.

There has been both support and criticism for the NIV 2011, particularly as it handles what have come to be known as gender issues. I won’t comment on those, but I thought I’d highlight a few of the other changes between the 1984 NIV and the 2011 NIV.

Change 1: Is it “Christ” or “Messiah”?

The 1984 NIV used “Christ” to translate the Greek Χριστος (Christos) almost exclusively. There’s nothing wrong with that. But one refreshing change I noticed is that when Χριστος is used referring to the prophesied savior to come (mostly in the Gospels), the 2011 NIV uses “Messiah” instead of “Christ”. Elsewhere, where a particular person, Jesus, is referred to using Χριστος, the 2011 NIV uses “Christ” (or “Jesus Christ” or “Christ Jesus” as the Greek text warrants).

This is a refreshing change. I think sometimes we slip into thinking that “Christ” is Jesus’ last name, and this change helps us remember that in the Gospels it is a title referring to the Savior to come.

Change 2: Is it “Saints” or “Holy Ones”?

I was less excited about this change, but can understand why the committee made it. This typically shows up in the epistles. I think the change is primarily about focusing on the effect of Christ on someone (made holy) versus focusing on some sort of status ascribed to a person as a result of that effect. The use of “saint” today is different than it was in the 1970′s and 80′s when the NIV was originally translated, so some sort of change is defensible, though it wreaks havoc with the way I remember and have internalized the text since my younger days.

These are just a few of the larger, consistent changes between the 1984 and 2011 editions of the NIV. There were scads of smaller changes, as well. If you’re really interested in those sorts of details, and you have the 1984 NIV available in Logos, you can use Logos 4′s Bible Comparison features (Morris Proctor talks about it briefly here) to tease out all of the differences—even punctuation, which is sometimes very interesting!

If you don’t have NIV 2011, you can pick yours up today!

Has the NIV been beneficial to your Bible study? Leave us a comment and tell us how!

The NIV Application Commentary: Old Testament Is Now on Pre-Pub!

Logos has had the 20-volume NIV Application Commentary: New Testament available for some time, but you may not know that the 12-volume NIV Application Commentary: Old Testament is now available on Pre-Pub as well! The demand for this collection is high and it’s already under development, so time is of the essence to pick up the Old Testament collection at a discounted price.

The NIV Application Commentary is unlike any other commentary series. Not content to simply focus on application of the biblical text, this series takes the original meaning of the text and mines it for its contemporary significance. It would be a mistake to see the NIV Application Commentary as simple devotional literature. The ultimate goal of this series may be application, but that doesn’t stop these commentaries from being credible reference materials.

The Application Commentary: Old Testament series includes insights from such notable scholars as John H. WaltonRobert L. Hubbard, Jr.Andrew E. Hill, and Karen H. Jobes. Each author in the NIV Application Commentary breaks their exegesis into:

  • Original Meaning: This section helps you grasp the author’s intended meaning by looking at the biblical passage’s historical, literary, and cultural context.
  • Bridging Contexts: In this section, the commentary wrestles with discerning the historical aspects of the passage which have direct twenty-first century correlations—and those which do not. This section focuses on drawing out both explicit and implicit parallels.
  • Contemporary Significance: By looking at contemporary issues and contexts, the authors of the NIV Application Commentaries confront modern readers with ideas and principles as powerful and challenging as the Scriptures would have been to its original audience.
Here is what people are saying about the series (check out the product page to see even more endorsements):

The NIV Application Commentary series doesn’t fool around. It gets right down to business, bringing this ancient and powerful Word of God into the present so that it can be heard and delivered with all the freshness of a new day, with all the immediacy of a friend’s embrace.
Eugene H. Peterson

It is encouraging to find a commentary that is not only biblically trustworthy but also contemporary in its application. The NIV Application Commentary will prove to be a helpful tool in the pastor’s sermon preparation. I use it and recommend it.
Charles F. Stanley, pastor, First Baptist Church of Atlanta

The NIV Application Commentary series promises to be of very great service to all who preach and teach the Word of God.
J. I. Packer, Regent College

The NIV Application Commentaries add unique value to your library. If you are looking for ancient wisdom and modern relevance, pre-order the NIV Application Commentary: Old Testament while it’s still on Pre-Pub.

Under Development: The Complete Works of Stephen Charnock

The Complete Works of Stephen Charnock (5 vols.) is currently under development, but you can pick it up while it’s still at the Pre-Pub price of just $69.95—that’s 70% off the retail price. These five volumes contain 64 theological discourses from Charnock including his most well-known work, The Existence and Attributes of God.

Enjoyed for hundreds of years, The Existence and Attributes of God is comprised of sermons Charnock delivered at Crosby Hall, London. Charnock died in 1680 while delivering this series of discourses which explore God’s traits and characteristics in both the Old and New Testament. Many believe these sermons epitomize the excellent and holy character Charnock developed in his 53 years.

In addition, several of Charnock’s other discourses address topics like church stability, obedience, the Lord ’s Supper, and so much more.

Here’s what the Evangelical Witness and Presbyterian Review said about Stephen Charnock and his writings:

The place of Stephen Charnock among theologians has long been definite and distinguished. . . . massive, substantial, and thorough, [Charnock’s works] well represent the religious thinking and character of the man.

Be sure to pick up The Complete Works of Stephen Charnock for the Pre-Pub price of $69.95 before it ships!

Get a Free Resource for Washington’s Birthday

Today Logos joins the rest of the United States in celebrating Washington’s Birthday (don’t worry, the sales team will still be here to take your orders!). You can celebrate with us by downloading a free copy of Inaugural Addresses of the Presidents of the United States. But hurry, it will only be available until midnight on Tuesday, February 21!

The Background of Washington’s Birthday

Americans have celebrated George Washington’s birthday long before it was declared a national holiday. It wasn’t until 1879 that February 22, became a national legal holiday (one of only 11 permanent holidays established by Congress). In 1968, Congress passed the Monday Holidays act which moved the celebration of Washington’s birthday from February 22 to the third Monday in February.

While there have been many attempts to change the name of the holiday to Presidents’ Day in honor of both Washington and Abraham Lincoln (whose birthday falls on February 12), this proposal has always been rejected by Congress. Contrary to popular belief, the holiday is still Washington’s Birthday.

Since 1862, George Washington’s Farewell Address has traditionally been read in the United States Senate. This document includes the following profound statement:

“Of all the dispositions and habits which lead to political prosperity, religion and morality are indispensable supports. In vain would that man claim the tribute of patriotism, who should labor to subvert these great pillars of human happiness, these firmest props of the duties of men and citizens. The mere politician, equally with the pious man, ought to respect and to cherish them. A volume could not trace all their connections with private and public felicity. Let it simply be asked: Where is the security for property, for reputation, for life, if the sense of religious obligation desert the oaths which are the instruments of investigation in courts of justice? And let us with caution indulge the supposition that morality can be maintained without religion. Whatever may be conceded to the influence of refined education on minds of peculiar structure, reason and experience both forbid us to expect that national morality can prevail in exclusion of religious principle.”

Check Out These Deals!

We have also discounted some other political and patriotic titles. Check deals on these titles:

Don’t miss an opportunity to add these resources to your library. They go back to their regular prices at midnight on Tuesday, February 21.

If you want to browse similar titles, you can do a faceted search under the topic Politics & Government. Faceted browsing is a great way to find materials you may have missed.

So download your free copy of Inaugural Addresses of the Presidents of the United States today, check out some of the other deals we have available, and have a happy Washington’s Birthday!