Archive - Products RSS Feed

Get Notes and Highlighting on Your Android Device!

If you use Logos’ Android Bible app, now you can add new functions for mobile Bible study, among them notes, highlighting, and resource text selection. Interact with the Word: save your thoughts and comments on any verse or book, and mark the text with colors and symbols.

You’ll get:

  • Notes: Attach your thoughts and comments to a verse or book for future reference.
  •  Highlighting: Mark the text your way with more than 80 colors and symbols.
  • Languages: Access the original Greek and Hebrew with a simple tap-and-hold on any word in the Bible. You’ll instantly see the term’s lemma and morphology.
  • And much more!

With your free Logos account, you can grow your mobile library on your own terms, choosing from Logos’ and Vyrso’s  27,000-plus Bibles, commentaries, reference guides, Christian living books, and other titles. Just sign in with your Logos account to start browsing.

The Android Bible app helps you experience fuller, richer Bible study wherever you go—and it’s absolutely free.

Learn more about Logos’ Bible app for Android by visiting the Android page, or simply download the app today from the Google Play store.

Accessing the Original Languages Using Logos Discourse Resources

The Problem

Few would deny the importance of learning Greek, Hebrew, and Aramaic for teaching and preaching. Despite this high view of the original languages, I’ve heard numerous pastors lament the limited practical payoff of investing seminary time and effort in learning languages. As language skills get rusty, it takes more and more effort to do the kind of passage analysis that the professor recommended. Language study can end up becoming more word study than passage study. This is not a new problem, and it is not going to go away anytime soon. However, I have made it my mission in life to see the receding tide of interest in original language study turned around. The big question is how to do it.

An Idea

While researching the problem, I found that Bible translators had applied modern linguistics to the study of biblical languages in incredibly useful ways. There was a problem, though. Their work was not applied to exegesis, and it was horribly technical. The result: few scholars in biblical studies saw any value in it. I tested out the ideas on students and was surprised with what I found. Yes, linguistics can be complex, and yes, it takes extensive training to be able to completely analyze a discourse. But—and this is a very important but—once students had a basic knowledge of the devices and saw where they occurred in a passage, they were in a much better position to understand the overall flow of the text. So besides just learning the concepts, people needed access to this very specialized data (more on the access issue here). My mission had gained a bit more focus.

A Solution

I spent the next five years writing my doctoral dissertation and brainstorming a new kind of database. Meanwhile, Logos moved their company headquarters from Oak Harbor, WA, to Bellingham, where I had been living since 1985. I showed them my ideas and waved my arms to describe what my idea would look like. They took a risk, and here’s what’s come about.

  • Lexham Discourse Hebrew Bible and Lexham Discourse Greek New Testament: original language databases identifying the most exegetically significant discourse devices and providing a basic propositional breakdown to help you digest the syntax. If you have a basic knowledge of the language—even if it’s very rusty—then these resources will enhance your study.

There was a fairly common response to these resources: “Where has this stuff been? Why didn’t I learn this in school?”

The High Definition OT and NT provide most of the same Hebrew and Greek analysis, but they display it on the ESV text. These resources also come bundled with their original language counterparts.

  • Discourse Grammar of the Greek New Testament: After the NT databases shipped, I was often asked how someone could better understand the devices and their relationship to traditional grammar and exegesis. We needed a grammar book designed for folks with a traditional background in Greek. The Discourse Grammar has been endorsed by leading scholars like Dr. Peter Gentry and Dr. Daniel Wallace, and it’s being used at leading seminaries like Southern Seminary, Dallas Seminary, and Knox Theological Seminary.

I made some rather unscholarly (goofy?) videos to demonstrate that discourse grammar is not brain surgery—it’s stuff we do every day.

  • Introducing Greek Discourse Grammar: Video Series: After receiving invitations from schools to come and teach a discourse grammar course, we decided to make a video series that provides an overview of the Discourse Grammar concepts using things like funny road signs and jokes to help you better understand how we use language and to show how this understanding can enhance your exegesis. Here are some samples from the series: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5.
  • Greek New Testament Discourse Bundle: This bundle includes the Lexham Discourse Greek New Testament, Lexham High Definition New Testament: ESV Edition, Discourse Grammar of the Greek New Testament, and the High Definition Commentary: Philippians, along with a collection of essays from leading scholars in discourse studies dedicated to my mentor, Wycliffe translator Stephen Levinsohn. This bundled set saves you nearly $75 compared to buying the resources individually.

Turning the Tide

There is a belief that if you read long enough and widely enough in the original languages after leaving school, you will gain a deeper insight into Greek and Hebrew. While this may be true, the reality is that very few ever reach this level of competency. This is not a practical solution.

The growing suite of Logos discourse resources has been intentionally designed to give you the kind of insights that professors promised. And there are some new discourse projects in the works.

They say “all boats are lifted by a rising tide,” and this holds true for reinvigorating Greek and Hebrew study. Strengthening our exegetical skills will sharpen our understanding of Scripture and our ability to compellingly communicate its message. More effective preaching and teaching will ultimately strengthen the church. The Logos discourse resources represent a significant step forward. If you’ve already purchased some of the discourse resources and have recommendations for new users, be sure to post a comment about your experience.

Read the NT like a Scholar: Save $200!

For the next two weeks, Understanding the Bible Commentary Series: New Testament—which used to be the New International Biblical Commentary: New Testament—is on sale for a spectacular price. Through August 19, you can get this 18-volume commentary, which retails for $299.95, for only $99.95!  Save $200 with coupon code UBCNTSALE before 11:59 p.m. (PDT), Sunday, August 19.

Excellent Scholarship Made Accessible

For years, students, pastors, and leaders have studied the New Testament with the help of the NIV-based New International Biblical Commentary. Understanding the Bible Commentary Series: New Testament’s 18 volumes have earned a reputation for scholastic rigor and clear language.

In this thorough, approachable commentary, such trusted scholars as F. F. Bruce, Craig A. Evans, Larry W. Hurtado, and Gordon D. Fee take you through each New Testament book, examining the biblical setting, the original Greek, and historical and literary issues. Each volume includes a detailed contextual chapter illuminating the New Testament in its original form.

Don’t forget about Understanding the Bible Commentary Series: Old Testament (16 vols.) on Pre-Pub!

Save Big Today

Don’t miss this opportunity to save hundreds of dollars on an incredible commentary—get the 18-volume Understanding the Bible Commentary Series: New Testament for just $99.95 with coupon code UBCNTSALE through August 19.

Love Logos? Tell the World!

Logos Organic Onesie—$6.00!

Sometimes you want to take Logos with you—and share it with everyone. With our mobile apps, you can do just that. But did you know that you can also show your love with Logos branded merchandise? It’s true! Now you can take to the streets with Logos shirts, caps, fleeces, mugs, water bottles, and more.

There was a time when items like these were available only to employees, but not anymore. Now you can purchase your own Logos swag at incredible prices.

Why not show up at that morning meeting with your stainless steel Logos mug? This beautiful 16 oz. cup is on sale for only $5.37! Or maybe you want to take your Logos Water Bottle with you on your hike. You can for only $3.60! But for less than $10, why not get both?

“I Am Not a Venti Cup” $4.80

Pick up stylish Logos-wear:

Don’t worry—there’s something for everyone. Even your infant can get in on the fun with the Logos Onesie!

Visit the Logos merchandise page now and get all your Christmas shopping done in August!

Free Book of the Month: The Epistle to the Hebrews

“Every student of the Epistle to the Hebrews must feel that it deals in a peculiar degree with the thoughts and trials of our own time.”

Thus begins Brooke Foss Westcott’s The Epistle to the Hebrews, August’s Free Book of the Month.

This classic reference work takes you deep into Hebrews through extensive verse-by-verse exegetical commentary and multiple dissertations on related subjects. An extensive introduction covers this important epistle’s title, history, and purpose.

“Bishop Westcott’s treatise is, and will doubtless finally take its place as, a classical work. This it deserves, not only from the fulness and completeness of the materials he has assembled, and the refined and scholarly judgment with which they are handled, but from the clear, the just, and the measured views which he takes on all the difficult problems connected with the Epistle. There is a wonderful charm too in his wider views, regarding the deep subjects treated of in the Epistle.”—The Church Quarterly Review, 1891

Westcott studied at Cambridge’s Trinity College from which he graduated in 1848. He stayed at Trinity, where, in 1849, he attained fellowship and was ordained as a deacon and priest. He received honorary degrees from Oxford (1881) and Edinburgh (1883). In 1890, he became bishop of Durham.

His Hebrews commentary is part of the 14-volume Classic Commentaries on the Greek New Testament. Enter to win this commentary set—worth $239.95—at our Free Book of Month page. And download your free book today!

Huge Savings on a Massive Academic Collection from Baker Publishing

Logos has teamed up with Baker Publishing to provide amazing academic resources at incredible prices. Take the Baker Academic Biblical Studies Bundle, for example. Here you have 86 volumes of outstanding scholarship from respected contemporary scholars and theologians for only $999.95.

This bundle is made up of the following collections:

If you were to purchase these Pre-Pubs individually, you would pay more than $1,400—and that’s at Pre-Pub prices! To purchase this collection retail would cost you over $2,500. Right now, though, you can order this collection for just $999.95. But don’t wait—the price goes up to $1,399.95 at 11:59 p.m. (PDT) Sunday, August 12.

Baker and its imprints Baker Academic and Brazos Press, are established, trustworthy publishers of Christian academic works. No matter your theological background, you’ll find Baker’s academic books full of healthy, vibrant, and irenic research material written by some of the best-known names in Christian academia. With the massive Baker Academic Biblical Studies Bundle, you get resources from such biblical luminaries as:

When you add this 86-volume bundle (which, in print, would run past 30,000 pages) to your collection, it becomes part of a vast network of biblical resources—a network worth far more than the sum of its parts. Imagine walking up to a shelf of books and saying, “Show me the information you have on James 1:5,” and then having all your books open and arrange themselves, giving you access to the information you need. This is precisely what you get with your Logos library. $999.95 is a terrific price for all these books; for the power you’re adding to your Logos resources, it’s nothing short of amazing.

The price of this Pre-Pub goes up at 11:59 p.m. (PDT) Sunday, August 12. Act now and you’ll add inspiring resources to your library at a phenomenal price. Pre-order this amazing collection today!

Save Now on George Eldon Ladd Titles

Born this day in 1911, George Eldon Ladd is considered one of the twentieth century’s most important New Testament scholars. Ladd, born in Alberta, was educated at Gordon Divinity School (now Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary) and Harvard, where he received his PhD in classics under preeminent New Testament scholar Henry J. Cadbury. After pastoring a number of Baptist churches, Ladd went on to teach New Testament at Gordon and at Fuller Theological Seminary in Pasadena, California. After teaching for 30 years at Fuller, Ladd passed away in 1982.

The author of 14 books and a number of important articles, Ladd is mostly known for his works on eschatology. He was a proponent of “inaugurated eschatology”—or, as it’s more commonly called, the already-not yet. Ladd wrote, alongside his works on eschatology, about the New Testament Kingdom of God and Jesus’ resurrection; he also wrote commentaries on Matthew, Acts, and Revelation, plus a critical study of the Bible, which included a book on Rudolf Bultmann. His title on Bultmann, published in 1964, was an important work in many regards. At a time when evangelical scholarship was isolating itself from continental scholarship in fear of being infected by liberalism, Ladd fully engaged the theology of one of the twentieth century’s most influential New Testament scholars. Ladd took seriously both his personal faith in the Jesus Christ and critical and objective scholarship, and this drove him to produce the best in evangelical scholarship.

Save Now on Ladd Resources!

In 1974, Ladd published what would become his greatest contribution to New Testament scholarship: A Theology of the New Testament. To celebrate the birthday of one of the last 75 years’ most important New Testament scholars, Logos is having a weeklong sale on A Theology of the New Testament, offering it for only $24.95 with the coupon code LaddNTT. Revised in 1993, Ladd’s New Testament volume is a master class in New Testament theology. Every student, teacher, and pastor should own a copy of this vital work. But we’re not stopping with A Theology of the New Testament! We’re also offering The Last Things: An Eschatology for Laymen for only $9.99 with the coupon code LaddLastThings. These coupons codes are good through the end of the day Wednesday, August 8! Pick up your copies today, and celebrate the birthday of a giant in New Testament studies.

Breaking Down Complexity with HDOT & HDNT

Although the Scriptures’ overall message is simple enough for even children to understand, there are spots in both testaments where the original-language grammar gets pretty complex. Complex enough that English translations often simplify it for readability. There’s nothing wrong with this, but it does make it harder to get back to the detail of the original. This is where the Lexham Discourse Bible and High Definition projects can fill a void, especially if you’ve never studied Greek or Hebrew.

Here’s what I’m talking about. In Deuteronomy 12:29–30, there are two commands, with a whole bunch of context given before them. Because of the complexity, most versions break up the one complex statement into a series of shorter ones. This is an appropriate translation strategy, but it can have the unintended consequence of obscuring the main points. The main points are the commands not to become ensnared with and not to inquire about the foreign gods in the land God is giving to Israel. But there’s some preamble to set the stage for these commands. Here’s what it looks like in the Lexham Discourse Hebrew Bible.

The blue “complex” statement on the left of verse 29 indicates that the main clause will, because of all the extra detail that precedes it, be indented one level. Verse 29 establishes the context in which the “big idea” commands apply (i.e., when they enter the land and dispossess the nations), but this is not the big idea. Verse 30 is indented one level, indicating this is where the main clause is found.

But wait, there’s more! The command “take care” in v. 30 is also not the big idea, creating another “complex” situation. This command is what’s called a metacomment, an attention-getting device that draws attention to something surprising or important that follows. In this case, the main points are actually in the commands beginning with “that”: not being ensnared to follow foreign gods and not inquiring about them. All that precedes is setting the stage for these important comments. Here is what the same passage looks like in the Lexham High Definition Old Testament.

This kind of detail is very hard to find in translation, but it can be easily found using the Lexham Discourse resources propositional outline.

We find the same kind of thing in the New Testament in Ephesians 2:1–5. Just as in Deut. 12:29–30, we find a complex construction that leads into yet another complex construction. You wouldn’t be able to find this kind of detail in most translations, due to their simplifying the complex sentence into several simpler ones. So what’s the big idea? That we have been made alive together with Christ. All the rest is (very important) scene-setting detail.

There are two parts to the scene-setting: the believer’s situation and God’s situation. Paul reminds us of the specific context in which God acted on our behalf, making us alive in Christ.

The Lexham Discourse resources offer you unparalleled access to detail like this, which you won’t find in most commentaries. They annotate all instances of 20-plus important exegetical devices, all displayed on a propositional outline. The Lexham High Definition New Testament: ESV Edition and the Lexham High Definition Old Testament: ESV Edition come with glossaries and introductions to help you learn how to get the most out of the resources. If you are interested in more of the original language detail, the Lexham Discourse Hebrew Bible and the Lexham Discourse Greek New Testament are what you’d want; they come bundled with the HDOT and HDNT, respectively.

The New Testament resources are available for download, along with other supporting resources. The Old Testament resources will be shipping soon, and they’re available at a substantial discount.

For more information about the Lexham Hebrew Discourse Bible and the Lexham High Definition Old Testament, check out these posts:

Lead Your Church through the Life of Abraham

“How good and pleasant it is when God’s people live together in unity!” (Psalm 133:1)

Do the words of the psalmist describe your church community? How about the way your church studies Scripture? Logos has developed a new curriculum to help your community “live together” when studying the Bible: Abraham: Following God’s Promise: Complete Church Curriculum.

Designed for pastors, small-group leaders, or anyone else involved in corporate or individual study,  Abraham: Following God’s Promise walks your entire church through the life of the first patriarch. The heart of the resource is an eight-chapter commentary that combines critical interpretation with insightful application. Balancing depth and accessibility, the curriculum helps readers at all levels discover better Bible study. It makes for perfect reading during the week, whether as personal study or in preparation for your small-group or Sunday-morning worship.

To serve the needs of small-group leaders, the complete church curriculum expands the commentary into an eight-week Bible-study series. With eight lesson plans, introduction videos, and teaching slideshows, the curriculum gives you the means to usher your groups through a rich study of Abraham’s life. The lesson plans include speaker notes, reflection questions, vibrant graphics, and discussion-question handouts. You’ll be equipped to guide your faith community deeper into Abraham’s journey of faith.

For pastors, the complete church curriculum molds the commentary into an eight-week sermon series. With eight sermon outlines and teaching slideshows, Abraham gives you insightful, challenging, dynamic resources for the pulpit. Used on Sunday morning, these tools will bring to life the journey your community has been reading about during the week. With vibrant visual illustrations and sermon-outline handouts, congregations will enter into the biblical narrative together as they learn how Abraham continues to model a faithful response to God’s call.

Whether used in individual study, in small groups, or on Sunday morning, Abraham: Following God’s Promise: Complete Church Curriculum serves the church at all levels and in all teaching contexts.Known for connecting digital resources and biblical study, Logos multiplies that power by  interconnecting all levels of the church in the mission to better understand—and more readily participate in—God’s continuing story of redemption.

Join us: get the single volume or the complete church curriculum today.

Birthday Sale: Save 50% on the Oswald Chambers Collection

Oswald Chambers, the Scottish minister best known for his beloved devotional My Utmost for His Highest, was born 138 years ago today. Celebrate his birthday by picking up the 24-volume Oswald Chambers Collection for only $95.88 with coupon code OC529—that’s 50% off the retail price!

Quotable and thought provoking, Chambers’ works are still cherished by Christians worldwide. Whether you’re new to Christianity or you’ve been studying the Scriptures for decades, you’ll find treasures liberally sprinkled throughout Chambers’ volumes:

“The diabolical nature of sin is that it hates God, it is not at enmity against God; it is enmity. When you get the nature of sin revealed by the Holy Spirit, you know that this phrase is not too strong—red-handed anarchy against God.”—from God’s Workmanship

“There are people to-day who are going through an onslaught of destruction that paralyses all our platitudes and preaching; the only thing that will bring relief is the consolations of Christ. It is a good thing to feel our own powerlessness in the face of destruction, it makes us know how much we depend upon God.”—from Baffled to Fight Better

“The aspect of the cross in discipleship is lost altogether in the present-day view of following Jesus. The cross is looked upon as something beautiful and simple instead of a stern heroism. Our Lord never said it was easy to be a Christian; He warned men that they would have to face a variety of hardships, which He termed bearing the cross.”—from Approved unto God

“In the New Testament everything centres in the Cross. The Cross did not happen to Jesus: He came on purpose for it.”—from Bringing Sons into Glory

Until you have stopped trying to be good and being pleased with the evidences of holiness in yourself, you will never open the wicket gate that leads to the more excellent way. The life ‘hid with Christ in God’—that is the more excellent way.”—from If Thou Wilt Be Perfect

“The questions that matter in life are remarkably few, and they are all answered by these words ‘Come unto Me.’ Not—‘Do this’ and ‘Don’t do that,’ but ‘Come.’”—from Our Brilliant Heritage

“One great characteristic in the life of a man whose life is hid with Christ in God is that he has received the gift Jesus Christ gives. What gift does Jesus Christ give to those who are identified with him? The gift His Father gave him, The Father gave Him the Cross, and He gives us our cross.”—from Christian Disciplines

Learn more about Oswald Chambers—then save 50% on his works. To get the discount, pick up the Oswald Chambers Collection by the end of the day Saturday, July 28, with coupon code OC529!