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Free Francis Chan Books from Vyrso!

Vyrso’s free Francis Chan offer has expired. Check out Vyrso’s April sale for more freebies and special offers. 

Vyrso.com is offering Francis Chan’s Crazy Love, Forgotten God, and Erasing Hell for free. This very special offer is only available until Saturday, April 7, at 11:59 p.m. (PST), so get your free ebooks and share this opportunity with your friends!

Francis Chan, founding pastor of Cornerstone Church in Simi Valley, CA, released Crazy Love: Overwhelmed by a Relentless God in 2008. This powerful book about falling in love with God shot to the top of the New York Times Bestseller list, selling over 175,000 copies in the first year.

Giving all of Crazy Love’s royalties away to the charitable Isaiah 58 Fund, he began work on Forgotten God: Reversing Our Neglect of the Holy Spirit. This message of embracing a life led by the Holy Spirit also resonated with readers, and Forgotten God was on many bestseller lists as well.

In 2011, Chan released his third book Erasing Hell, where he examines what the Scripture says about the afterlife, an issue Chan says, “we can’t afford to get wrong.”

These ebooks can be read on:

Don’t wait! This amazing offer is only available through Saturday, April 7. Jump over to Vyrso’s special Francis Chan page and get your free ebooks now!

Save on Dietrich Bonhoeffer’s Works for a Limited Time

Who stands fast? Only the man whose final standard is not his reason, his principles, his conscience, his freedom, or his virtue, but who is ready to sacrifice all this when he is called to obedient and responsible action in faith and in exclusive allegiance to God—the responsible man, who tries to make his whole life an answer to the call of God.”—Dietrich Bonhoeffer

The definitive edition of Dietrich Bonhoeffer’s works and letters is on Pre-Pub. This 15-volume collection features Bonhoeffer’s significant contributions to Christology and Christian ethics, biographical information, and correspondence. The Pre-Pub price of $339.95 is a limited-time savings—the price goes up Wednesday, April 11.

It is difficult to separate Bonhoeffer’s legacy from the turbulent times that birthed his theology. A vehement anti-fascist, he became a double-agent in the German military intelligence organization Abwehr. Bonhoeffer, after wrestling with the ethical implications, joined a small resistance group within the Abwehr with the intention to assassinate Hitler.

Bonhoeffer was arrested on April 6, 1943. Although his custody wasn’t in connection to any assassination attempts, Hitler eventually uncovered Bonhoeffer’s part as an Abwehr conspirator. Bonhoeffer was led to the scaffold in the Flossenbürg concentration camp on April 9, 1945—only days before the American liberation of the camp. Bonhoeffer’s last reported words were, “This is the end . . . for me, the beginning of life.”

The Dietrich Bonhoeffer’s Works collection includes Letters and Papers from Prison, a brilliant collection of correspondence that reveals the spiritual foundation alluded to in Bonhoeffer’s theological writings. Whether discussing the evolution of his theological thought, the difficulties of life in prison, or everyday trivialities, Bonhoeffer’s letters are marked by a steadfast devotion to God—a devotion which influenced all who came in contact with him.

Dietrich Bonhoeffer’s Works goes up in price on April 11, so don’t wait. Order your copy today to get this limited-time discount!

Logos to Translate Works of Thomas Aquinas into English for the First Time!

Thomas Aquinas (1225–1274) is certainly one of the most important theologians in history. His immense corpus of work covers every aspect of Christian life and doctrine, penetrating to the core of mankind’s relationship with God. Despite its undeniable importance, much of Aquinas’ work remains available only in Latin. That’s about to change. Logos is going to translate his Commentary on the Sentences of Peter Lombard, Commentary on the Prophet Isaiah, and Commentary on the Prophet Jeremiah into English.

Aquinas wrote three major works of theology. His Summa Theologica (1265–1274) and Summa Contra Gentiles (1264?) have been available in English for almost a century. But his third major piece, his Commentary on the Sentences of Peter Lombard, remains untranslated. Aquinas wrote the Commentary on the Sentences in his twenties as a brand new professor at the University of Paris. The commentary influenced his contemporaries and remains heavily cited by modern theologians. In it, Aquinas broached topics that would dominate his later works, such as the relationship between Aristotelian philosophy and theology. It also offers Aquinas’ most sustained treatments of ecclesiology and sacramental theology.

Translating these works is an extensive, expensive project; that’s where the Logos Pre-Pub system comes in. We can bring together thousands of people from around the world to finally make these resources available in English. This translation will be a major event in Thomist studies, and everyone who places a pre-order is a direct part of it.

Logos’ translations of the commentaries on Jeremiah and Isaiah will likewise have a large impact on the study of Aquinas’ thought. Aquinas is gaining attention as more scholars realize that his thought was built on a profoundly scriptural foundation. Indeed, some scholars have suggested that our whole interpretation of Thomas’ work must be re-visited in light of his biblical commentaries. Logos’ translations of the commentaries of Jeremiah and Isaiah will be a huge contribution to these exciting developments.

Thomas Aquinas’ thought is remarkably valuable, and it is amazing that after 750 years so much of it remains inaccessible to the majority of English speakers. Logos is remedying this. You can help! Place your Pre-Pub orders today.

Free Book of the Month: John Bunyan’s Grace Abounding to the Chief of Sinners

John Bunyan’s classic Grace Abounding to the Chief of Sinners is April’s Free Book of the Month!

“. . . as I was sitting by the fire, I suddenly felt this word to sound in my heart, I must go to Jesus; at this my former darkness and atheism fled away, and the blessed things of heaven were set within my view.”John Bunyan

John Bunyan, one of history’s most prominent Puritans, traces his own spiritual pilgrimage in Grace Abounding. He describes his trials, temptations, and sorrows, as well as how he came to rely on Christ for his every need.

Bunyan penned Grace Abounding while he was imprisoned (for preaching without a license), as a letter of encouragement to his congregation, Bunyan’s story of conversion continues to encourage Christians today.

You can get this book for free all month long, and when you visit the Free Book of the Month page, you can enter to win the 61-volume Works of John Bunyan Collection.

Visit the Free Book of the Month page to download your free book and enter the giveaway!

Celebrate Princeton’s Bicentennial with the Princeton Theology Collection!

Logos is celebrating Princeton’s bicentennial with the Princeton Theology Collection. Use the coupon code Princeton17903 to purchase this collection before April 13, 2012, and it’s yours for only $399.95!

For 200 years the world has benefited from Princeton Theological Seminary’s rich history. If you aren’t convinced, read through a list of Princeton alumni. You’ll find influential figures like:

Logos wanted to do something special to celebrate Princeton’s birthday, so we put together the Princeton Theology Collection. This collection compiles the works from four of Princeton’s central figures.

Time has not lessened the influence of these theological giants. Many of the moral, ethical, and spiritual issues they tackled in the nineteenth century are still as timely and important. Firmly rooted in the Reformed tradition, they laid a foundation for what it meant to be a Calvinist in America while battling critics of biblical inspiration and authority.

If you were to purchase these four collections separately, you would pay over $700. The Princeton Theology Collection is on sale for $499.95; that’s a savings of over $200. But it gets even better! If you purchase this commemorative collection before April 13, 2012 with the coupon code Princeton17903, you can get it for $399.95!

Celebrate Princeton’s birthday today and pick up the Princeton Theology Collection today before the coupon code expires!

Don’t miss out on an opportunity to bid on the Princeton Theological Review (443 issues). This collection features over 82,000 pages worth of powerful journal articles in the tradition of Old Princeton. It is currently on Community Pricing; help set the price on this collection. Place your bid now.

Looking for more Old Princeton content? Check out these amazing resources:

Now on Pre-Pub: Zondervan Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament

The Zondervan Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament (ZECNT) is making a name for itself among scholars and pastors.

With five volumes already in print, the ZECNT is packed with fresh insight and critical New Testament engagement. It stands out among exegetical commentaries by engaging necessary scholarly literature without being bogged down with technical jargon and esoteric excursions.

Each of the authors in the ZECNT writes specifically for the scholar or pastor engaged in church life and ministry. This series is for those who wish to know what the text means and how it applies to the modern reader.

Recently, Logos added two new volumes of the ZECNT to Pre-Pub: Clinton Arnold on Ephesians and Thomas Schreiner on Galatians. These authors are well-known New Testament scholars and have written extensively in the areas of Pauline theology.

Galatians

With a major commentary on Romans in the Baker Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament, Thomas Schreiner has established himself as one of evangelicalism’s premier Pauline scholars. As with Romans, Galatians is one of the most important New Testament writings dealing with justification and works. Schreiner works carefully through Galatians, slowing down at points of controversy and confusion to illuminate the text. Schreiner’s commentary on Galatians should be on the shelf of every pastor, alongside Longenecker, Bruce, and Dunn.

Ephesians

Clinton Arnold is no stranger to Ephesians, having written the Ephesians commentary for the Zondervan Illustrated Bible Backgrounds Commentary series. He is also the author of a number of journal articles that explore central topics in Ephesians. His contribution to the ZECNT contains a detailed introduction to Ephesians, discussing both its theology and historical context. This would be a great addition to your Ephesians collection, ranking among O’Brien, Best, and Lincoln as one of the best critical commentaries on Ephesians.

Once the ZECNT update ships the price will go up. Pick up the Zondervan Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament today!

Proclaim Announces Exciting New Features

Proclaim is making it even easier to create great presentations. Our revolutionary church presentation software now syncs with your Planning Center Online account and seamlessly displays webpages. When you subscribe to Proclaim at our low monthly (or annual) introductory rate, you get access to new features as they are released, with no expensive upgrade costs. Proclaim subscriptions start at just $100 per year.

Download Proclaim now—for free!

Syncing Your Planning Center Online Account

By connecting to your Planning Center Online account in Proclaim, you don’t have to create your service twice. Normally, when you plan your service in Planning Center Online, the “service order” needs to be placed into whatever presentation software you use. But with Proclaim, it’s as simple as clicking “Import from Planning Center” to start a new presentation. Proclaim shows you a full view of all your planned services, simply select the plan you desire and your service is duplicated in Proclaim. Edit the slides and you’re ready to present. It’s that simple!

“We are excited about the Planning Center Online integration in Proclaim. This is a great step towards making Sunday morning even easier. With your service plans in Planning Center you can now start a presentation in Proclaim simply by connecting your account.”—Jeff Berg, owner and developer of Planning Center Online

Using Webpages in Your Presentations

Proclaim also allows you to share any webpage live without the need for awkward screen adjustments. Show videos from sites like YouTube or Vimeo, teach with maps, or even share the websites of ministries your church is supporting. The possibilities are as endless.

And remember, you can also send information to mobile devices in your congregation with our Signals feature, giving your audience links to webpages for future reference. Proclaim is revolutionizing the way churches prepare and present their services. If you haven’t tried Proclaim yet, don’t wait—download it now!

What’s So Cool about Greek Apocryphal Gospels?

You may have seen an announcement for a new Pre-Pub called Greek Apocryphal Gospels, Fragments and Agrapha.

Yes, that’s a mouthful. But what are they? And are these things actually useful to me in my study?

I think they are, and I’m pretty excited about working on this project.

These documents are not canonical. Some of them are just fragments that were found in dumps of papyri. But they give us insight into how early Christians dealt with their faith, how they told others about things they’d heard, and how they interacted with the myriad of stories and tales they were hearing about this guy Jesus and his disciples. These documents also teach us more about the Greek the early church used. Just think, something useful for historical studies and grammatical studies!

This resource includes gospels, which means it centers on things that tell the story of Jesus. Different people see different kinds of these gospels. I include three basic different types:

  • Infancy Gospels. These include stories about Jesus’ youth and even earlier. The Protevangelium of James includes a much fuller story about Mary and Joseph with all sorts of details (even about Mary’s midwife) that are not canonical by any stretch, but insightful nonetheless.
  • Passion Gospels. These are gospels about the trial, crucifixion and resurrection of Jesus. They have similarities with the canonical gospels, but include expansions and embellishments as well.
  • Post-resurrection Gospels. The Greek extant for the Gospel of Mary is fragmentary, but insightful; one of the available fragments has a snippet of a story where Peter turns to Mary and asks her to relate what she knows of Jesus.

There are also fragments of apocryphal gospels.  One of these, P.Egerton 2, is fantastic. It consists of a few fragments, but these compile in short succession a number of events that are easily recognizable in the canonical gospels. Again, we get to see how early Christians understood the canonical gospels, how they framed that material, and how they used it for other purposes.

Among the coolest things, from my perspective, are the agrapha. The word technically means “unwritten”; in this context it denotes sayings that claim to originate with Jesus but aren’t in the canonical gospels as we’ve received them. Some of my favorites of these are in the Apostolic Fathers, in the written work known as Second Clement, which is the earliest complete non-canonical sermon we’ve got today. In chapter 5, there is an allusion to Matt 10.16 / Luke 10.3, but with an expansion and a twist:

2 For the Lord said, “You will be like sheep among wolves.” 3 And answering, Peter said to him, “But if the wolves tear apart the sheep?” 4 Jesus said to Peter, “The sheep have no fear of the wolves after they are dead, and you have no fear of those who kill you and who are able to do nothing more to you, but you fear him who after you are dead has power to throw soul and body into the hell of fire.” (2 Clem 5.2–4)

Whether this was really something Jesus said, we have no idea. But isn’t it interesting that it would be used in the early church (early/mid second century) in a sermon?

What is in the resource?

The resource includes morphologically analyzed Greek of each of the included gospels, fragments, and agrapha. So it will be searchable and useable much like you’d use any morphologically analyzed Greek edition (NT, LXX, Apostolic Fathers, Philo, etc.). In addition, I’ll be writing introductions and providing bibliographies for each major document and fragment. The agrapha will probably have a single introduction and bibliography.

This is pretty much the same format we used for the Old Testament Greek Pseudepigrapha with Morphology. The goal is to provide a useable Greek text and, because the material is not that familiar to many, decent introductions to each of the major documents giving some background, history, and applicability to one’s studies of the Bible.

Does that sound like fun? It does to me. If it does to you too, then order the Pre-Pub and let’s get this thing going!

Excited about this project? Leave us a comment!

An Interview with Dr. Ben Witherington III

I remember reading Conflict and Community in Corinth and enjoying it so much that I rushed out to buy and devour Grace in Galatia. Since then, the Socio-Rhetorical Commentary Series has become invaluable to my New Testament studies.

Logos recently added the 5-volume Ben Witherington III Collection to the growing list of resources available from Dr. Witherington. This collection offers sensitive insight into areas of doctrine and interpretation where discussions can become entrenched and contentious.

Some of the topics include:

  • Baptism
  • God’s sovereignty
  • Prophecy
  • Grace
  • The Lord’s Supper

After looking at the content in this collection, I was excited for the opportunity to interview Dr. Witherington.

Logos: What are the risks of reading the Scriptures through a particular dogmatic lens? Do you see any benefits?

Dr. Witherington: I honestly don’t see any benefits to reading Scripture through a dogmatic lens. Over and over again it leads to eisegesis rather than exegesis, a reading back into the text things that are not there and reflect a later era.  It’s called anachronism.

For example, I was having a conversation with a Greek Orthodox brother the other day who wanted to insist that Jesus’ dialogue with Nicodemus was about the Christian theology of baptism—”born of water and the Spirit.”  Besides the fact that historically such a conversation surely was unlikely to happen between two early Jews (after all, there was no church or Christian baptismal practice yet), there is the further problem that the very next verse explains that ‘water’ here refers to what happens at physical birth (flesh gives birth to flesh) and then Spirit is the one who produces “the new birth” or “being born again.”  The discussion is indeed about the necessity of conversion even for devout early Jews.

Logos: Many Christians are raised or educated within specific theological frameworks, each with its inherent strengths and weaknesses. Assuming that your tradition is orthodox, how do you maintain the tension of honoring your background while allowing Scripture the freedom to contradict and challenge your beliefs?

Dr. Witherington: I don’t think your primary concern should be with the theological tradition you are raised in. Your primary concern should be your faithfulness to God’s Word wherever that leads, even if it contradicts things you were taught. I think you should value your tradition but critique it in light of the Bible.

Logos: Theology often comes out of a wrestling match between the theologian, his presuppositions, and Scripture. Of the five books in the Ben Witherington III Collection, which one was the biggest wrestling match for you?

Dr. Witherington: Clearly, the most controversial one is The Problem with Evangelical Theology. In that book I argue that all Evangelical traditions are most apt to stretch Scripture or misinterpret it when they try to say something distinctive. In other words, all Evangelical traditions fall short of full conformity to Scripture—whether we are talking about Calvinism, Arminianism, Pentecostalism, Dispensationalism, or any other ism.

Logos: What part do other believers play in challenging the way we interact with Christ through Scripture? How do we stand on our convictions and challenge each other without getting contentious and divisive?

Dr. Witherington: I find it invigorating, a sort of “iron-sharpens-iron” situation, when orthodox Christians of varying views challenge and have friendly debates about things. It helps us see our strengths and weaknesses, and, if it is done in a charitable manner, can be helpful to all.  But the ruling principle is speaking what you see to be the truth in love, not in a partisan spirit. All persons who have a high view of Scripture have much to learn from each other, and we should all admit our knowledge is partial and incomplete. Humility pills should be taken all around when we discuss these things.

Logos: What projects are you currently working on?

Dr. Witherington: I am currently working on a college-level Introduction to the New Testament for Oxford University Press, and my wife and I are working on our fifth novel in our series of archaeological thrillers.  The last one came out last fall, entitled Corinthian Leather, and has been well reviewed.  The next one is called Roma Aeterna, and centers on finding the tomb of the apostles Adronicus and Junia.

Logos: Thank you Dr. Witherington for taking the time to talk to Logos Talk.

You can save nearly $60 on the Ben Witherington III Collection (5 vols.) while it’s on Pre-Pub, or check out other Ben Witherington resources on Logos today!

New Counseling Resources Are Available Individually

The Biblical Counseling Collection contains tons of practical counseling resources. We’re talking about 30 volumes by 20 authors from 12 different publishers! This is a fantastic collection of resources for both counselors and pastors.

Interested in particular volumes, but not the whole series? You’ll be happy to learn that these titles are now available separately.

If you’re looking for specific types of counseling resources, the contents of the Biblical Counseling Collection can be broken into these categories:

General Counseling

Spirituality

Life Issues

Marriage

Women’s Interests

Men’s Interests

You’re going to save more (nearly $100) by buying the whole Biblical Counseling Collection. But if you have been eyeing some of these titles separately, they are available for you to purchase today.
Curious about other collections we have recently broken up? Find out which collections are available as individual titles!