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Save on the Updated JPS Commentary Collection

The JPS Tanakh Commentary Collection includes two new volumes: Ruth and Haggadah. This already-respected 11-volume commentary set is now better than ever!

Now through September 30, 2012, you can get this updated collection for just $289.95—use coupon code JPSTC to save over $100.

Important Hebrew Insight

JPSTC’s contributors include Nahum M. Sarna, Michael Fishbane, and other notable Hebrew scholars. Line by line, these authors discuss the text’s themes and nuances. With current research, essays on key biblical words and themes, charts, and maps, they create a Hebrew Bible guide accessible to anyone. Here’s what others are saying about individual JPSTC volumes:

“[The JPS Bible Commentary: Ecclesiastes] is an insightful and accessible commentary that reflects many years of deep engagement with the text.”—Journal of Hebrew Scriptures

“Without a doubt, [the JPS Bible Commentary: Haftarot is] the finest commentary on the Haftarot I have studied.” —David L. Lieber (1925–2008), emeritus president, University of Judaism (American Jewish University)

“[The JPS Torah Commentary on the Haggadah] is a significant and valuable work that, in examining the Haggadah from an historical perspective, offers insight into Jewish history as well.” —Chicago Jewish Star

Get It Today

This collection includes the complete Torah commentaries plus commentaries on Jonah, Ecclesiastes, and the Haftarot; now it includes volumes on Ruth and the Haggadah, too. Get all 11 volumes for just $289.95 by using coupon code JPSTC before 11:59 pm (PDT) Sunday, September 30. Order today to save over $100!

Only 3 Days Left for Back-to-School Savings!

Time’s running out on the Logos Back to School sale! There are only three days left to save up to $1,600 on academic commentaries, lexicons, and more. Whether you’re a student or not, our Back to School Sale will help you save big on some of our most popular resources.

Here’s just a few of the amazing resources at amazing prices:

The New International Commentary on the Old Testament (23 vols.)

Retail: $899.95 

Only $689.95 with Coupon Code B2SNICOT

The NICOT has long been the gold standard in Old Testament exegesis. Such authors as Gordon Wenham, Bruce Waltke, Tremper Longman III, and Daniel Block make this a must-have series.

New International Commentary on the New Testament (21 vols.)

Retail: $879.95 

Only $679.95 with Coupon Code B2SNICNT

Begun in the late 1940s by an international team of New Testament scholars, the NICNT series has earned pastors’, students’, and scholars’ acclaim as a critical yet orthodox commentary marked by solid biblical scholarship within the evangelical Protestant tradition.

Pillar New Testament Commentary
(14 vols.)

Retail: $663  Regularly: $497.25

Only $399.95 with Coupon Code B2SPNTC

The Pillar New Testament Commentary writers interact with the most important, informed contemporary debates, avoiding undue technical detail. Their ideal is a blend of rigorous exegesis and exposition, scholarship, and pastoral sensitivity, with attention both to biblical theology and to the Bible’s contemporary relevance.

This Is Only the Beginning!

There’s more savings in the Back to School sale, but you have to act soon. All deals expire at the end of the day (midnight PDT) Thursday, September 13, 2012.

Head to the Back to School page, and check out these terrific deals. And don’t forget to take advantage of our interest-free payment plans and stretch your payments out for up to 12 months!

The Faithlife Study Bible Advantage: Part 1

The Faithlife Study Bible was designed for tablets, but it’s fantastic for your desktop Bible study, too! And it’s free through March 2014.

With the FSB, we’ve reimagined what it means to center your life on Scripture. The FSB doesn’t just have the tools you need to elevate your personal study—it can revolutionize the way your faith community shares the Word together.

The Features You Need

  • Study as deeply as you want—The FSB meets you where you are. New to Bible study? Immerse yourself in the first layer of notes and get a handle on the cultural background and significant points of the passage you’re studying. Once you’re more familiar with the message, you can move on to the next layers of notes and really put the passage under the microscope.
  • Use the Bible translation you like best—Download the FSB and you get the Lexham English Bible free! But don’t think you’re tied to that translation. The FSB syncs to whatever translation you use most.
  • Customize your notes—Create notes and highlights that are unique to you with
    • 9 highlight colors
    • 15 text colors
    • More than 50 markups and symbols
  • Study wherever you are—You may do most of your study at your desk, but you don’t have to. Your study is synced and stored in the cloud. Start reading at home in the morning and continue to dig deeper on your iPhone, your Android device, or any web browser with Biblia.com.
  • Remember more of what you learn—Connecting with information in multiple ways increases your retention dramatically. With access to tons of photos, videos, and infographics, you’ll engage the biblical text in ways that ensure you’re thinking both critically and creatively.
  • Enjoy the Lexham Bible Dictionary—With more than 1.5 million words in over 2,700 articles, the LBD gives you deep, scholarly content. And you can count on new articles and additions to existing articles developed in response to new discoveries, perspectives, and controversies.

The Study Bible That Grows with You

The Faithlife Study Bible keeps getting better. We’re continually writing new content, increasing its depth and breadth. With the FSB, you have a study Bible that’ll continue to grow with new notes, articles, maps, videos, infographics, and photos. And you can subscribe now through March 2014, absolutely free!

3 Reasons Logos Resources Are So Valuable

I talked to someone recently who pointed out that some Logos resources are public domain. His question to me was, “Why should I pay for books I could possibly find for free?”

This was a great question, and I was able to quickly rattle off three features that make Logos books invaluable.

1. Networked Resources

Every book in a normal library (whether physical or electronic) operates independently; the value of each book is primarily the information it carries. Your Logos resources, however, are linked together, building a vast network of information. When Logos creates an electronic book, we tag the contents by word, phrase, topic, and reference, making the whole of your library exponentially more valuable than the sum of its parts.

Logos senior vice president Dale Pritchett communicated this multiplying value in a fantastic 2010 blog post entitled “The ‘Network Effect.’

Not only do Logos books create an extensive network of information—they make up a growing ecosystem of platforms tying Bible study together. You can use your Logos library for study, discuss rich passages with your Faithlife Community, or easily share quotes and passages with your congregation via Proclaim.

What makes networked resources so amazing is that they’re completely searchable—in seconds! Imagine opening the 86-volume Baker Academic Biblical Studies Bundle and pulling up every one of the collection’s references to John 17 in moments. Now imagine that with thousands of resources.

2. Multiple Platforms Mean Constant Accessibility

Not only can you access your books from your PC or MacBook—you can access them with the iPhone or Android apps.

That’s not all! You can also read your books on any browser through Biblia.com or while connected with your friends and church on the Faithlife Community apps.*

3. Your Resources Are Updated for Free

We shared some updates to the Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary in a blog post back in May. These included fixes to typos, bibliographic milestones, links to nearly 40,000 bibliographic citations, and thousands of references to new data types. All these updates happened behind the scenes without you having to lift a finger.

A customer recently commented in the forums how pleased he was to find his Oxford Bible Commentary updated—this is a product we haven’t sold in many years.

These are just a couple of reasons why Logos books are the most valuable electronic resources available. If you’re looking to start your own Logos library, make sure to check out our base packages. You’ll get tons of resources at pennies on the dollar, as well as fantastic features for Bible study!

 

*If you haven’t downloaded the Faithlife Study Bible, it’s free through March 2014 with the coupon code FREE. Once you have the study Bible, you’ll be guided to the Faithlife Community iPhone and Android apps.

Receive Chapters of Reformed Dogmatics Before It’s Released!

It’s been nearly 18 months since we announced our translation project for Geerhardus Vos’ Reformed Dogmatics. The project is currently under development, and we’re excited about its progress. So excited, in fact, that we’re going to release the first two chapters early! Anyone who pre-orders Reformed Dogmatics by September 12, 2012, will have the first two chapters unlocked on September 13.

Geerhardus Vos taught at both Calvin Theological Seminary and Princeton Theology Seminary alongside such luminaries as J. Gresham Machen and B. B. Warfield. He was an outspoken proponent of Reformed biblical theology. Cornelius Van Til wrote that “Vos was the greatest pedagogue I ever sat under,” and John Murray said Vos was “the most penetrating exegete it has been my privilege to know.” This project is the first and only English translation of Vos’ Gereformeerde Dogmatiek.

We assembled a team of translators from North America and the Netherlands. The translation leader, Richard B. Gaffin, is an acclaimed Vos scholar who’s published numerous articles on Vos and who edited Redemptive History and Biblical Interpretation: The Shorter Writings of Geerhardus Vos. Gaffin has taught at Philadelphia’s Westminster Theological Seminary since 1965.

Everyone who’s pre-ordered by September 12 will get these two chapters:

  • The Knowability of God
  • Names, Being, and Attributes of God

Written in a catechetical format, Reformed Dogmatics expresses rich Reformed theology in a thoughtful question-and-answer dialogue.

On what ground do others deny God’s knowability?

On the ground that God is All-Being. They have a pantheistic view of God. Now, knowing presumes that the object known is not all there is, since it always remains distinct from the subject doing the knowing. Making God the object of knowledge, one reasons, is equivalent to saying that He is not all there is, that He is limited.

What response is to be made against this view?

a) The objection that this view presents stems entirely from a philosophical view of God, as if He were All-Being. This view is wrong. God is certainly infinite, but God is not the All. There are things that exist, whose existence is not identical with God.

b) It is certainly true that we cannot make a visible representation of God because He is a purely spiritual being. But we also cannot do that of our own soul. Yet we believe that we know it.

If you haven’t pre-ordered Reformed Dogmatics yet, what are you waiting for? Order it by next Wednesday, September 12, and add the first two chapters to your Bible study library on September 13!

Back to School Sale: Karl Barth’s Church Dogmatics

Today’s post on Karl Barth is from Matthew Wilcoxen. Matt is a PhD student at Charles Sturt University, focusing on Barth and the concept of time. He is a graduate of Biola University and Talbot School of Theology.

The term classic is applied to a work with lasting influence—a singular exemplar of a new mode of thought, one that leads to widespread imitation and sharp critique. A classic of Christian theology must also, of course, be an attempt to say afresh the message of the Bible. As the dust settles on the life of Karl Barth, it becomes increasingly clear that his magnum opus, the Church Dogmatics, deserves a place on this top shelf of Christian intellectual history, where it sits rightfully alongside the works of Augustine, Aquinas, and Calvin.

Karl Barth the Professor

The son of a Reformed minister, Barth (1886–1968) was himself stimulated to study theology through a confirmation class he took as an adolescent. He went on to study at Bern, Berlin, Tübingen, and then Marburg, receiving a thorough initiation into the liberal Protestant theology regnant on the continent in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. During WWI, Barth was busy studying the Epistle to the Romans. This would lead to multiple editions of a landmark commentary. In the words of one contemporary, the important second edition published in 1922 was a “bomb that fell on the playground of the theologians.” This book was so revolutionary that it catapulted Barth to the top rungs of the German academy, landing him a professorship in Göttingen. From here he would go on to teach at Münster, Bonn, and—after being expelled from Germany by the Nazis—Basel, where he would spend the rest of his career and write the bulk of the nearly-9,000-page Church Dogmatics.

Karl Barth’s Church Dogmatics

The Church Dogmatics unfolds the same insight as the commentary on Romans—that revelation, the sovereign act of God, occurs outside of and in spite of all human possibilities. Through the study of, in particular, Luther, Reformed Christology, and Anselm’s Proslogion, Barth found the tools at his disposal to build a theological system on the objective reality of God in the incarnate Christ. Thus “in Christ”—applied to both God and human beings—is the method and the content of the 13 part-volumes of the Church Dogmatics. So not only due to his contemporary influence, but because Barth refuses to take as given anything other than Immanuel, “God for us,” Barth’s theology is continually solidifying its status as a classic.

This method of building a theological system engages Barth in lengthy scriptural exegesis, engagement with all strands of Western Christian theology, and critical interactions with modern philosophy. And since Barth sees true human existence in Jesus Christ, ethics is never treated as ancillary to theological reflection; in the Church Dogmatics, themes like prayer, sanctification, and other issues central to Christian discipleship figure quite prominently. There is something here for everyone—the student, the preacher, or even the accomplished scholar.

* * *

As part of our Back to School Sale, you can pick up a copy of Barth’s classic Church Dogmatics for just $379.95 (with coupon code B2SBarth). Check out Barth and all the other amazing deals we have on sale for our Back to School Sale.

Win an iPad and a Base Package from the Glorious Ruin Tour!

The Glorious Ruin Tour, featuring Tullian Tchividjian, kicks off September 20 in Fort Worth, Texas. Glorious Ruin, Tchividjian’s latest book, looks into the gloriously counterintuitive truth of a God who suffers with you and for you.

Glorious Ruin is now available for pre-order on Vyrso.com.

“Why then do we suffer? Why does God allow so much of it? What, if anything, are we supposed to learn through it? And, most importantly, when will it end? Nothing forces us to confront the deeper questions of life quite like suffering. Nothing makes us face the gnawing emptiness inside more nakedly. Nothing confirms our suspicion more powerfully that this is not how things are supposed to be.” —Tullian Tchividjian

Thanks to Logos’ ecosystem of related resources, Glorious Ruin will connect to relevant titles in your digital library, deepening its themes and references. You’ll read it on the go with the Logos, Vyrso, or Faithlife mobile app. And as always, you’ll be able to read on the web with Biblia.com.

To pre-order Glorious Ruin, visit Vyrso.com today!

To mark Glorious Ruin’s launch, Logos has teamed up with David C. Cook to bring you an awesome chance to win a copy. If chosen, you’ll also win a brand-new third-generation iPad equipped with a Logos Silver Library! This giveaway will run through the last date of the 2012 leg of the Glorious Ruin Tour, November 8. The winner will be announced Monday, November 12.

 


By entering the contest you are opting in to receive emails from Logos and Logos partners.

Free Book of the Month: Psalms and Hymns of Isaac Watts

“Blest are the humble souls that see their emptiness and poverty; Treasures of grace to them are giv’n, and crowns of joy laid up in heav’n.”—Isaac Watts

The Psalms and Hymns of Isaac Watts is September’s Free Book of the Month!

Isaac Watts (1674–1748) was an English hymnist and theologian. Recognized as the “Father of English Hymnody,” he wrote over 500 hymns, including “Joy to the World” and “When I Survey the Wondrous Cross.”

As a young boy, Watts began to write poems and hymns to delight his mother. He received an excellent education as a child and then studied at the nonconformist academy at Stoke Newington. After completing his education, Watts began to write hymns. The Psalms and Hymns of Isaac Watts puts all his beloved hymns at your fingertips.

You can get Watts’ book free through the end of September, and when you visit the Free Book of the Month page, you can enter to win the 14-volume Works of Isaac Watts collection.

Visit the Free Book of the Month page now to download your free book and enter the giveaway!

Experience the Biblical Story with Rich Media

Sometimes all it takes for an idea to really click is a strong visual representation. Infographics make information more accessible, engaging, and memorable. That’s why the Faithlife Study Bible supplements its study notes with stunning images, videos, and infographics of biblical places and artifacts.

When we talk about infographics, we’re not talking about pie charts and bar graphs. We’re talking about dynamic, colorful graphic art that brings the Bible’s information to life.

The Faithlife Study Bible gives you:

  • Infographics—See the Bible’s story with over 120 infographics, timelines, and tables.
  • Photos—Get to know biblical locales, including Israel, Greece, and Turkey, with over 240 pictures.
  • Videos—Visit the Bible’s setting with over 35 videos.

We’re never done building the Faithlife Study Bible’s study notes and infographics. We’ll be adding rich media and study materials to the FSB all the time!

You can get the Faithlife Study Bible absolutely free through March, 2014.

Win a Scholar’s Library from Faithlife!

Enter now and you could win a Scholar’s Library base package from Faithlife. This grand prize will add more than 475 books and commentaries—worth nearly $8,000 in print—to your library. When you combine the Scholar’s Library with the powerful Faithlife Study Bible, you have the raw materials for profound Bible study. Enter now!

An Interview with Joel B. Green, Editor of the NICNT

One of the best resources in Logos’ Back to School Sale is the New International Commentary on the New Testament (NICNT). Until now, you could only get the NICNT as part of the complete New International Commentary series. Now we’re thrilled to offer the NICNT at the incredible price of $679.95 (with code B2SNICNT)So thrilled, in fact, that we asked the NICNT’s editor—Dr. Joel B. Green of Fuller Seminary in Pasadena—if he would be so kind as to answer a few questions about the NICNT’s history and what goes into publishing a volume in this time-honored series.

How long has the NICNT been in existence?

The NICNT was begun in the late 1940s by an international team of scholars within the evangelical Protestant tradition.

What makes the NICNT such a popular New Testament Commentary?

Several reasons come to mind. First, although the commentaries are based on the Greek text, they don’t assume much familiarity with Greek among their readers. This makes for a scholarly yet widely accessible resource. Second, our commentaries are urged to comment on the biblical text itself, rather than provide a running dialogue with secondary literature. Of course, our commentators interact with other New Testament scholarship, but this critical engagement is carried out in the footnotes. Third, these commentaries are concerned with scholarly New Testament study in the service of the church. Our first audience isn’t the biblical studies academy, but pastors, students, and other church leaders. As a result, volumes in the NICNT put critically engaged, evangelical scholarship on display.

Commentary series have different guidelines that authors must abide by when writing a volume—word-count restrictions, confessional constraints, etc. Does the NICNT have any specific guidelines that your authors must work within?

Someone has referred to the current problem of “commentary bloat,” and the evidence is on our shelves, virtual or otherwise, with the presence of ever-larger and multivolume studies. There’s a place for that kind of exposition and scholarly interaction, but it doesn’t represent the aims of the NICNT. Most people don’t have the time to read 50–75 pages on a single pericope as they prepare for Sunday’s sermon or Thursday’s Bible study. As a result, we want single-volume commentaries of a manageable size. How this works out depends on the book in question and the challenges it presents. For example, when I was writing the NICNT on the Gospel of Luke, I needed to keep in mind that I could average no more than about 14 words of commentary for every word Luke wrote. Gordon Fee’s commentary on Philippians—well, he had considerably more space with which to work! Authors chosen for the NICNT have no confessional statements to sign, but are selected from within the larger evangelical family. F. F. Bruce, of course, was associated with the Open Brethren Church, while Gordon Fee is ordained in the Assemblies of God. I myself belong to the Wesleyan tradition and am ordained in The United Methodist Church. The list goes on to include a variety of scholars from a variety of ecclesial backgrounds, all of whom are committed to classical Christian faith.

You are now the fourth person to serve as NICNT editor. The previous two, F. F. Bruce and Gordon Fee, each wrote, like you, at least one volume in the NICNT. How does contributing to the series help you now that you’re the NICNT editor?

Bruce and Fee each wrote multiple volumes in the series and in this way helped to give the series its shape. Interestingly, the guidelines for the series that have been passed from editor to editor don’t do a lot to give the series its focus. The best advice I received from Fred Bruce when he asked me to write the NICNT on Luke was “Do it like this, but don’t do it like that . . .” Having written for the series, then, gives one a keener sense of what is needed and what temptations need to be resisted.

If you had to choose one NICNT volume as your favorite, or one that best represents the series as a whole, which would you choose?

That’s a tough question. On the one hand, I’ve often thought of Gordon Fee’s commentary on 1 Corinthians as the “standard” for evangelical commentary: clearly written, eminently readable, a model of exegesis in the service of the biblical text, biblical interpretation for the church. Among my favorites, though, would be R. T. France’s volume on Matthew, which represents decades of intimacy with Matthew’s Gospel, with his mature reflections on this Gospel evident on every page.

The series has been ongoing for many years. When and how is a decision made to replace an older volume in the NICNT?

A couple of factors guide our thinking. First, of course, a commentary can become dated in terms of the sorts of questions it seeks to answer. Second, our audience—pastors, students, and other Christian leaders—tell us that a replacement is needed as they find other commentaries more helpful. This could lead to a revised edition or to a replacement volume.

What new volumes should we look for over the next couple of years?

The most recent volume is Gareth Cockerill’s work on Hebrews, the appearance of which we continue to celebrate. Looking to the near horizon, we anticipate a revised edition of Gordon Fee’s work on 1 Corinthians, and replacement volumes on the Gospel of Mark (by Rikki Watts) and Paul’s Letter to the Galatians (by David deSilva).

Now is your opportunity to get the NICNT on sale during our Back to School Sale. While you’re there, check out all the other amazing deals we have on the NICOT, BECNT, Barth’s Church Dogmatics, and more!