Archive - Products RSS Feed

9 Provocative Quotes about Satan

Lewis Sperry Chafer is the author of February’s Free Book of the Month, Satan. The book is free, but only until tomorrow—get it today!

Here’s a preview:

1. Creation of Satan: “Since he was created, he is not self-existent, and never can be free from his dependence upon the Creator.” (Chap. 1, page 13)

2. Place Satan dwells: “That the earth and the air are his present abode must be accepted on the testimony of Scripture: in spite of the almost universal impression that he is now in hell.” (Eph. 6:11, 12, 1 Peter 5:8, 9) (Chap. 1, page 16)

3. Satan’s sentence executed: “And in Rev. 12:7–12, where Satan is cast out into the earth and the execution of his sentence is begun, the announcement is made by a great voice in heaven, ‘Now is come salvation, and strength, and the kingdom of our God, and the power of His Christ.’ There is no evidence of a gradual process here; all is sudden and decisive.” (Chap. 2, page 34)

4. Satan and unbelievers: “According to Scripture, the relation of the unbelieving to Satan is far more vital than a mere pleasure-seeking allegiance.” (Chap. 3, page 45)

5. Satan’s dominion: “Again, Satan’s dominion is limited in that “there is no power but of God: and the powers that be are ordained of God (Rom. 13:1). In this Scripture it is revealed that Satan, though in authority, is not wholly free from his Creator, and that any direction of the governments of the world which he exercises is by permission from God.” (Chap. 4, page 51)

6. Satan’s authority over demons: “Although their origin cannot be definitely traced, it is probable that they were created as subjects of Satan in the primal glory, as he, also, was created as their prince and king. Satan, being in authority over these beings, doubtless drew them after him in his sinful attempt to thrust himself into the place of God.” (Chap. 5, 63)

7. Sin of Satan: “True, he has lowered his Creator, in his own mind, to a level where he supposes himself to be in legitimate competition with Him, both for authority over other beings and for their worship.” (Chap. 6, page 73)

8. Satan impersonations: “Thus his desire to be like the Most High has led him to a blasphemous attempt to imitate all the separate manifestations of the three Persons of the Godhead.” (Chap. 7, page 89)

9. Satan’s reliance on truth: “It has already been seen that the method of counterfeiting, if successful, will require Satan to appropriate and incorporate in his false systems every available principle of the true; for the deception of the counterfeit depends wholly upon its likeness to the real.” (Chap. 9, page 106)

LewisSperryChafer1929About Lewis Sperry Chafer

Lewis Sperry Chafer was born on this day in 1871, in Red Hook, Ohio. Chafer’s writings, the topic of much debate, are widely regarded as influential in the Evangelical movement in America. Dr. Scofield, Chafer’s Bible college professor, persuaded him to write Satan, which Scofield wrote the foreword for in 1909. Chafer went on to pastor Scofield’s former church in Dallas, TX, upon Scofield’s passing. He also became the founding president of the Evangelical Theological College in 1924. The college was renamed Dallas Theological Seminary in 1936. Chafer passed away August 22, 1952, in Seattle, WA.

Get Chafer’s Satan free!

56% Off the Time-Tested Encyclopedia You’ll Love: Bid Now!

Adding a reliable encyclopedia to your Logos library can do a lot for your Bible study. The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, 1915 Edition (ISBE) is one such time-tested resource, with contributions from leading twentieth-century theologians such as B. B. Warfield, Archibald Alexander, A. T. Robertson, and H. C. G. Moule. This comprehensive encyclopedia is on Community Pricing, where you can bid what you’d be willing to pay.

When you integrate the ISBE into your library, you’ll be able to look up thousands of words or phrases in the Bible or Apocrypha by right-clicking them and selecting the ISBE from the context menu.

Let’s say you’re reading through the Gospel of Luke and come across Luke 1:7: “But they had no child, because Elizabeth was barren, and both were advanced in years.” What is the significance of Elizabeth being barren? It brings to mind Abraham and Sarah, but maybe there’s more to it. If you were to look up “barren” in the ISBE 1915 edition, you would find a concise article written by Thomas Rees that gives you a cultural and biblical understanding of barrenness.

“. . . barrenness was a woman’s and a family’s greatest misfortune. The highest sanctions of religion and patriotism blessed the fruitful woman, because children were necessary for the perpetuation of the tribe and its religion. It is significant that the mothers of the Heb[rew] race . . . were by nature sterile, and therefore God’s special intervention shows His particular favor to Israel.”

Further, we read that “metaphorically, Israel, in her days of adversity, when her children were exiled, was barren, but in her restoration she shall rejoice in many children.” This gives us a solid understanding of what being barren would have meant to Jews in that time, which in turn helps us to understand the miraculous birth of John the Baptist.

The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia covers thousands of topics related to Scripture, history, geography, cultural milieu, and more. Bid now to save 56%!

Note: Do you already own the Ages edition of The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, 1915 Edition that was built for Libronix? If you do, you’ll receive this updated collection for free; the files will automatically download when it’s complete. The previous edition was created many years ago, using the best digital files available at the time. We’re rebuilding the 1915 ISBE from the ground up—this collection will contain new, updated files. If you don’t own the 1915 ISBE, enhance your library with one of the most useful and trusted reference collections by placing your bid today!

This Tool Will Change Your Word Studies Forever

Tools like the Bible Word Study, the Exegetical Guide, and Morph Search make it easy to explore the biblical text, but there’s one new tool in Logos 5 that gets you even closer to word meanings—instantly.

It’s the Bible Sense Lexicon, and it’s going to change the way you think about word studies forever.

What’s a “sense lexicon”?

The Bible Sense Lexicon ties biblical words to their senses. By “sense,” we mean the idea that a word is supposed to communicate. For example, the English word for “run” has many possible senses:

  • To move swiftly by foot
  • To conduct (e.g., to “run a search”)
  • An act of running (e.g., to “go on a run”)

The same principle applies to words in the Bible.

The Bible Sense Lexicon has tied words in the biblical text to their senses, giving you a precise idea of what the biblical authors were trying to get across.

Example: what does “head” mean?

In Isaiah 7:9, we read that “the head of Ephraim is Samaria and the head of Samaria is the son of Remaliah.” It’s obvious that “head” is a metaphor—the nation of Ephraim cannot have a literal physical head the way a human body does. But what does this metaphor mean?

We can activate the Reverse Interlinear ribbon, but without the Bible Sense Lexicon data, we’ll just see a bunch of Hebrew words (along with anything else we choose to display here).

BibleSenseLexicon

That’s great—if we know Hebrew. I don’t, so we’ll right-click it and run a Bible Word Study report on the lemma. (What’s a lemma? Find out here.) We’ll get a comprehensive report on the Hebrew word, how it’s used in the Bible, and lots of possible definitions!

BibleSenseLexiconII

That’s awesome: we see loads of ways this word is used in Scripture. This tool has just accomplished hours of research in seconds. But we still don’t know precisely what sense the word for “head” is used in. Does it mean “top”? “Beginning”? “Chief”? We could open up our regular lexicons and see if any one lists a specific sense for our verse in Isaiah.

Or we could see the sense in the Reverse Interlinear!

Bible Sense Lexicon IV

We can immediately see that the same Hebrew word is used to mean both “capital” and “leader”! So the capital city of Ephraim is Samaria, and the leader of Samaria is the son of Remaliah.

The Bible Sense Lexicon data makes the Reverse Interlinear ribbon one of my favorite tools in Logos 5. It’s a revolutionary way to cut right to a word’s sense—saving us even more time on word studies.

If you’re not using the Bible Sense Lexicon in Logos 5, you’re missing out. Get Logos 5 today—the Bible Sense Lexicon is included in Gold and higher.

Already have Logos 5? Learn to use it for richer Bible study and ministry with our educational resources.

Learn How Greek Developed after the New Testament

When it comes to Greek lexicons in English that cover the millennium following the New Testament, we really only have two options: Lampe’s A Patristic Greek Lexicon and Sophocles’ Greek Lexicon of the Roman and Byzantine Periods. And a hardback Lampe goes for upwards of $500–600, normally.

BDAG only covers up to the Apostolic Fathers. So if you want any help with Justin MartyrIrenaeus, or Hippolytus, you’re out of luck.

LSJ only covers up to the non-Christian fifth century. So if you want any help with TheodoretNonnus, or John of Damascus, you’re out of luck.

You’re out of luck, that is, unless you have Sophocles’ lexicon. 1,200 pages long, it covers up to the turn of the twelfth century. That’s almost one page per year.

A Greek professor once told me that studying New Testament Greek in isolation is somewhat like taking a single slice of a tree and trying to understand the whole tree. You must understand the roots to understand where the tree comes from; you must also understand the fruit to understand the tree’s result. A single slice can be misleading.

With LSJ, you can see where the Greek came from.

With BDAG, you can zoom in on a particular slice of time to see how Greek was being used.

And with Sophocles, you can see what direction the Greek took after the New Testament era.

The lexicon isn’t the only resource included in the Sophocles collection. You also get three other resources!

Two of the greatest English lexicographers of the past 200 years, J. H. Thayer and Frederick Danker, both thought very highly of this resource. Thayer thought so highly of it that he edited and republished it himself.

Let’s bring this wonderful resource into the twenty-first century. Bid on it now!

Important Patristic Documents Now Available on Community Pricing

The Patrologia Latina, GraecaSyriaca,and Orientalis represent some of the church’s most extensive, important primary-source documents. They contain the writings of the early and medieval Fathers and Doctors of the Church in Greek, Latin, Arabic, Armenian, Coptic, Ethiopic, Georgian, Slavonic, and Syriac. These texts are invaluable for anyone interested in patristics, church history, historical and systematic theology, textual criticism, or original-language study. In fact, the Patrologia Latina and Graeca served as the translation base for Philip Schaff’s Early Church Fathers and have been the bedrock for theological and historical studies of the Church Fathers.

PatrologiaThe Patrologiae Cursus Completus: Series Latina (Patrologia Latina for short), roughly translated “Complete Course on Patrology, Latin Series,” was published by Jacques Paul Migne between 1844 and 1864. The 221 volumes and approximately 150,000 pages that compose this important collection contain the writings of the Latin Fathers from Turtullian (in AD 200) to Pope Innocent III in (AD 1216). Each volume of the Patrologia Latina contains not only Latin editions, but also lengthy dissertations, introductions, critical apparatuses, and other supplementary material written in Latin. With the Patrologia Latina, you can research valuable but difficult-to-find works, like Radbertus’ and Ratramnus’ ninth-century writings on the Eucharist, which contain the earliest debate on transubstantiation and provide a window into the doctrine’s emergence and development.

The Patrologiae Cursus Completus: Series Graeca (Patrologia Graeca for short), roughly translated “Complete Course on Patrology, Greek Series,” was published by Jacques Paul Migne between 1857 and 1866. These 167 volumes and 110,000-plus pages contain the writings of the Greek Fathers from the late first or early second century to the fifteenth century. Many editions also contain notes on textual variants found among other manuscripts, along with explanatory material written in Latin. In addition to the 161 volumes of the PG (166 print volumes), the Logos edition also includes the later published index to the PG compiled by Ferdinandus Cavallera. With it, you can find entries by author, work, date, or subject. For those wanting to read important but obscure texts in their original languages, the Patrologia Graeca is a must. For example, you can read the Cappadocian Fathers, whose works were so important for formulating the doctrine of the Trinity against Sabellianism and tritheism.

These collections are not facsimile editions of page scans; they are full-blown, full-text Logos resources. Search, for example, for every occurrence of the word “filioque” to trace the important debate surrounding the procession of the Holy Spirit from the Son—a conflict that contributed to the Great Schism of 1054 between the Eastern and Western Churches. Search for “facienti quod en se est” to look for discussions on Franciscan pactum theology, which was so important for the controversies surrounding the Reformation era. Search for “θεοτοκος” or “ομοουσιος” to trace the important debates surrounding the deity of Christ.

Whether you’re Protestant, Orthodox, or Roman Catholic, if you want to delve into Christianity’s roots, these invaluable works will yield fruitful research not possible with print editions—and for a fraction of the price. Bid now to get an unbelievably low price with Community Pricing.

Save a Bundle on The Jewish Encyclopedia

It’s easy to forget that the Bible is a profoundly Jewish book. But a quick glance through the Old Testament reveals elements of Jewish history, poetry, and ancient narrative, all of which can seem incredibly foreign.

The Jewish Encyclopedia, published by Funk & Wagnalls around 1906, has been looked to for over a century as a guide through Jewish history, culture, rituals, and rabbinical teaching. Today it’s as much a research and study aid as it was in the early twentieth century. With this massive encyclopedia in Logos, it’s more accessible and useful than ever.

And now that it’s on Community Pricing, you can bid whatever you’d be willing to pay. With the current projected price, this is your chance to save 86%!

With thousands of articles, images, and illustrations, The Jewish Encyclopedia integrates beautifully into Logos, putting comprehensive accounts of Jewish history, literature, and intellectual life right at your fingertips. Don’t miss this opportunity to save 86% on The Jewish Encyclopediaplace your bid today.

Get a Free Copy of Abraham: Following God’s Promise!

Review Abraham: Following God’s Promise: Complete Church Curriculum on your blog and get your copy free.

Within a week of filling out the form below, you’ll receive an automatic notification from Logos Bible Software letting you know it’s been unlocked to your account.

Full Name*

Email*

Phone Number*

Your Blog URL*

Expected date your review will be posted on your blog*

Additional Comments

*required

We want you to see for yourself why this series is an incredible resource for anyone who wants to delve deeper into Bible study. The complete church curriculum version for pastors, small group leaders, and Bible teachers makes it’s easier than ever for communities to go deeper into the Word together.

The Studies in Faithful Living series explores the lives of biblical characters who responded in faith to God’s call. Each volume in the Patriarchs Collection, as well as Mary: Devoted to God’s Plan, examines key events in these characters’ lives and offers commentary, application, and teaching insights. Each eight-week study also includes questions for reflection and links to other resources for further study.

Israel Loken, the chair of Bible and theology departments at the College of Biblical Studies in Houston, Texas, recently remarked:

“Logos has taken group Bible study to the next level with their new Studies in Faithful Living series. Deeply engaging, biblically accurate, and filled with life-changing applications, this series is destined to be the go-to resource for lay leaders for years to come.”

Ready to write a review on your blog? Submit the form and we will unlock your free copy of Abraham: Following God’s Promise: Complete Church Curriculum.

Already own Abraham: Following God’s Promise, but still want to participate? We will make you the same offer for Mary: Devoted to God’s Plan Complete Church Curriculum. To get this offer, please email editor@logos.com.

Plato and Aristotle Coming to Your Logos Library!

Two must-have philosophy collections are now on Community Pricing: The Dialogues of Plato (5 vols.) and The Works of Aristotle (12 vols.).

Plato and Aristotle are more than required reading—they sit at the foundation of Western thought. And even though they lived several centuries before Christ, their writings greatly influenced the development of Christian theology.

Take Plato and Augustine, for example. Plato distinguished between the physical and spiritual realms and recognized the existence of eternal, unchangeable forms. Augustine drew from Plato in coming to terms with Christianity, describing in his Confessions that the writings of the Platonists helped him recognize the truths of Scripture (Book VII).

Aristotle’s writings provided Thomas Aquinas with the framework for his magnum opus, the Summa Theologica. He adopted Aristotle’s account of the physical world, as well as his approach to moral philosophy and ethics. Aquinas held Aristotle in such high regard that he refers to him simply as “the Philosopher” throughout his work.

The Logos editions of Plato’s and Aristotle’s works allow you to discover connections between these philosophers and the theologians that drew from them. Search key terms in Plato and Augustine and compare their thoughts side by side. When Aquinas references Aristotle, jump to that location in his corpus with a click. Enhance your Logos library and your theological study with these core texts of the Western tradition. Bid on The Works of Aristotle (12 vols.) and The Dialogues of Plato (5 vols.) today!

But why stop at Aristotle and Plato? Sign up to receive news and updates about more classic works of history, philosophy, and literature!





Exclusive: 50% Off Fortress Press Products

Save 50% with nine exclusive offers from Fortress Press!

We’ll be rolling out these deals on Twitter—a new offer every Monday through April 8.

Here’s how to make sure you don’t miss out:

  1. Follow us on Twitter.
  2. Look for #DailyDeal. (The tweets go out in the early morning and afternoon.)
  3. Click the product link, and use the tweet’s coupon code at checkout.

Here’s today’s deal:


Today you can save on Don C. Benjamin’s The Old Testament Story, which explains what the OT meant then, and what it means now.

Regular price: $40
#DailyDeal price: $20

To save 50%, use coupon code: DD15733

Get it now!

Save 50% on Resources for Lent

Lent_blog_400x147In many Christian traditions (Catholic, Lutheran, Methodist, Anglican and Presbyterian), this Wednesday marks the first day of Lent. For 40 days, observers everywhere will be forsaking things like meat, chocolate, or television—all in preparation for Easter. But why 40 days? What is Lent all about?

Origins of Lent’s 40 days

The tradition echoes Jesus’ fast during his 40 days and nights in the desert (Matt. 4:1-2), where he endured temptations offered by the devil himself. In that extreme climate, Jesus went without a bite to eat for more than a month. He must have been ravenous when the devil found him. And the theme of the first temptation? Bread (Matt. 4:3). After resisting the devil three times, Jesus banished him and went on to begin his public ministry, the culmination of which was his death on cross. Lent is a time of penance, prayer, and reflection as we contemplate Jesus’ ultimate gifts: his sinless life as a sacrifice for our sins, and his triumph over death.

The Hallmarks of Lent

Lent has many themes, but the three major motifs are denial, prayer, and reflection.

In honor of Christ, denial is exercised very intentionally during Lent. Jesus’ very life on earth was an example—he denied himself his incarnate form, humbling himself to walk among us, obedient to the point of death (Php. 2:5-8). And from the pages of the Bible he asks us to deny ourselves, take up the cross, and follow him (Matt 16:24). The self-denial associated with Lent helps focus our thoughts on him.

Focusing thoughts on God can easily give way to prayer and reflection. Jesus reveals the importance of prayer through example (Luke 6:12) and beseeches us to pray using parables (Luke 18:1). Through prayer and seeking God, Lent observers prepare for Easter by reflecting on why we celebrate it:

For to this you were called, because Christ also suffered for you, leaving you an example, so that you should follow in his footsteps, who did not commit sin, nor was deceit found in his mouth, who when he was reviled, did not revile in return; when suffering, he did not threaten, but entrusted himself to the one who judges justly, who himself bore our sins in his body on the tree, so that we may die to sins and live to righteousness, by whose wounds you were healed. (1 Peter 2:21–22)

This year, to help you reflect on Christ’s sacrifice during Lent, we’re offering several resources at 50% off:

Fifty Reasons Why Jesus Came to Die by John Piper

John Piper gathers 50 New Testament answers to the most important question faced by believers: What did God achieve for us in sending his Son to die? This book will help you reflect on the true meaning of Christ’s sacrifice. Get it now for only $4.98.

Jesus and the Victory of God by N. T. Wright

N. T. Wright pens a compelling account of how Jesus himself understood his mission as the divinely ordained fulfillment of Israel’s destiny. Get this resource for only $17.49.

The Murder of Jesus by John MacArthur

John MacArthur tells the story of Christ’s sacrifice, with special attention to Jesus’ words on the cross, the miracle that attended the Crucifixion, and the true meaning of Christ’s atoning work. Get this resource for only $7.50!

We’ve also discounted these powerful titles:

All Lent discounts extend through Feb. 13, so take advantage of these prices today!

Leave us a comment and tell us how you’ll be participating in Lent this year.