Help Us Make Logos 5 Globally Accessible

Translate

We would love to make Logos available in every language, but we don’t have the in-house language skills to support more than the Spanish versions we currently offer.

If you’re a bilingual Logos user, we’d like your help in translating our software to your native language.

The plan

Our commitment to you is this: if you and other volunteers translate at least 90% of the software, we’ll publish it. You’ll be able to switch between languages in the program settings. Work on more than 20 languages is already underway; the first ones are German, Dutch, Portuguese, Chinese (Simplified & Traditional), Korean, and French.

In addition, we’d like to do complete localization for a handful of languages: translating not only the software itself, but also everything that accompanies it—help files, datasets, web content, and service emails. (Hiring bilingual customer-support staff, too.)

If you’d like to read more about this project, see what Bob Pritchett, our CEO, said in the forums. [Read more...]

6 Reasons to Add Classic Commentaries to Your Library

Classic CommentariesOver the past year, we’ve added hundreds of classic commentary volumes to our system, including commentaries on every book of the Bible, plus a handful of nineteenth-century commentary sets, like the Cambridge Greek Testament and Meyer’s Commentary.

In the middle of all these releases, you may have missed the 40-volume collection of commentaries on the Minor Prophets. If you haven’t yet placed your bid, here are six reasons to do so:

1. Add breadth and depth to your scholarship

C. S. Lewis famously wrote:

“Every age has its own outlook. It is especially good at seeing certain truths and especially liable to make certain mistakes. We all, therefore, need the books that will correct the characteristic mistakes of our own period. And that means the old books. . . . Not, of course, that there is any magic about the past. People were no cleverer then than they are now; they made as many mistakes as we. But not the same mistakes. They will not flatter us in the errors we are already committing; and their own errors, being now open and palpable, will not endanger us. Two heads are better than one, not because either is infallible, but because they are unlikely to go wrong in the same direction.

[Read more...]

Get 15% Off a Base Package—Take up to 12 Months to Pay!

Logos 5 Spring SaleIf you’ve been thinking about buying Logos 5, now’s the time to act. With Logos’ Spring Sale, you can take 15% off the price of a base package.

Take advantage of a payment plan

Choose which base package is best for you, use coupon code SPRINGSALE to lock in your 15% discount, and pay with up to 12 easy payments. You don’t have to wait to start digging into God’s Word. We’ll split your bill up into a manageable, interest-free payment plan, and you can get started using Logos 5′s smart, intuitive features right away.

Is Diamond or Portfolio what you have in mind? For every purchase over $1,900, we offer an extended payment plan of 18 months—that’s an extra six months to pay! You’d have to make a $1,105 price jump from Platinum to get Diamond in a one-time payment. However, when you factor in an 18-month payment plan, Diamond costs just $10.62 more per month*—that’s 658 more books for just a few extra dollars per month. [Read more...]

The Biblical Polemic against Empires

The Biblical Polemic Against EmpiresHow many times have we heard that the Bible is a strange and ancient book with little relevance for the modern world? In The Biblical Polemic against Empires, Lanier Burns, research professor of theological studies at Dallas Seminary, provides ways to understand the Bible and its importance in our lives. He argues that we best understand the Bible when we comprehend the ways that biblical authors presented truths in the contexts of Egypt, Babylon, Hellenism, and Rome.

Burns connects our modern concerns with the ancient world by exploring biblical arguments in three areas—deity, kingship, and city:

  1. Attitudes toward deity: Ancient nations and empires, including Israel, were theocracies. Governments represented divine interests and powers. Not only was secularity in a modern sense unknown, but so was the notion of citizens selecting their leaders. Idolatry was a particularly heinous sin for the Israelites; other gods were mere projections of the desires of a sponsoring empire. The realms of gods and people were in a constant state of conflict and chaos. People served their gods in a frenzied way, trying to magically manipulate them in hopes of gaining prosperity.
  2. The tyranny of kingship: The Bible presents emperors as representative of sinful humanity, proud in their attempts to be gods and greedy in their appetites. These kings seem far removed from our lives until we realize that we have gods of our own choosing, idols drawn from various entertainments or escapes from daily pressures. [Read more...]

Theology in Conflict: Remembering Barth and Van Til

This week, we celebrate the birthdays of two of the twentieth century’s most significant theological minds: Karl Barth and Cornelius Van Til. Although they were theological adversaries, they were both men of faith who exercised enormous influence over the contours of theology in Europe, North America, and beyond.

Save $50 through May 11 on the 40-volume Works of Cornelius Van Til with coupon code VANTIL13 and Barth’s Church Dogmatics with coupon code BARTH13.

karl barthKarl Barth

Born on May 10, 1886, Barth was trained as a pastor but schooled in German Protestant Liberalism. However his time as a pastor during the First World War caused him to reject his theological upbringing for a theology based upon God’s dialectical revelation. Barth first made a name for himself with his commentary The Epistle to the Romans, but it wasn’t until his unfinished 10,000-plus-page Church Dogmatics that Barth articulated the full breadth of his dogmatic vision.

[Read more...]

Christ Is Risen! The Eastern Orthodox Celebration of Pascha

Easter (or “Pascha,” the Greek word for “Passover”) has yet to come for the Orthodox Church. While many Christians celebrated on March 31, a full five weeks separate the celebrations this year—Pascha takes place this Sunday, May 5. Let’s take a brief look at not only the history behind these differences, but also the manner in which Eastern Christians celebrate the Lord’s resurrection.

The dating of Easter has always been a complicated issue, going all the way back to the second century. At that time, the main divide was between those who celebrated on precisely the 14th day of Nisan (the Jewish Passover) and those who celebrated on the Sunday following the 14th of Nisan. This variance came to a head at the first Council of Nicaea (AD 325), when that assembly of bishops decided to regulate the celebration to always occur on a Sunday, or what had come to be called “the Day of the Lord” (Rev. 1:10).

A 19-year cycle of celestial calculations was developed, and this cycle, connected with the Julian calendar, has remained in use in the East. An 84-year cycle came to be used in the Western half of the empire, and so the first discrepancy (since the first Council of Nicaea) began to occur. With the assistance of the best astronomers and scientists of the time, Pope Gregory XIII revised the Julian calendar in 1582 in order to improve its accuracy. A reform of the Western lunar calendar—connected with the dating of Easter—also occurred. [Read more...]

Save $400 on the NICOT/NICNT!

the-new-international-commentary-on-the-old-and-new-testamentThis month only, you can use coupon code NICOTNT to save $400 on the New International Commentary on the Old and New Testament!

The NICOT/NICNT is one of the most respected commentary sets in the world. Many of its volumes have become classics in their own right:

  • F. F. Bruce’s commentary on Acts
  • Douglas Moo’s commentary on Romans
  • Gordon Fee’s commentary on 1 Corinthians
  • Bruce K. Waltke’s commentary on Proverbs
  • Leon Morris’ commentary on John
  • And more

But because it’s so prestigious, it doesn’t go on sale often. That’s why this sale is a big deal. Ordinarily you’d pay $1,699.95, but with coupon code NICOTNT, you’ll put $400 back in your pocket. In fact, with the special sale price and a payment plan, you’re looking at monthly payments of just $113.33. [Read more...]

One Day Only: Save on Resources for Prayer

 

National Day of Prayer

An Exposition on PrayerToday is the National Day of Prayer: a day of unified prayer for our communities and each other. In honor of the day, we’re offering a 25% discount on An Exposition on Prayer in the Bible—that’s $40 off the original price. Use coupon code PRAYER2013 to receive your discount.

In An Exposition on Prayer, James E. Rosscup teaches about the importance of praying without ceasing, thanking God through prayer, praying prayers that are saturated in God’s Word, and more. This five-volume collection gives insight into the importance and power of prayer.

Get more powerful prayer resources

We’re also offering a 10% discount on the following resources. Use coupon code NDOP2013 to receive your discount.

NavPress Prayer Collection (4 vols.)

Study topics such as praying through the Holy Spirit, praying as a leader, and empowering children to pray with faith. Whether you’re looking to pray for those around you as a pastor, as a parent, or as a friend, you’ll find practical, scriptural encouragement to improve your prayer life. [Read more...]

Save up to 22% on Commentaries for Grads

Grad Sale

Graduation is a unique milestone. It represents change and possibility; you can’t possibly plan for everything. That makes it tough to pick a graduation present that’s useful for the future.

So give your grad a gift that helps them keep learning: a commentary set.

Starting today, we’ve put three of our best-selling commentaries on sale through June 15. These commentaries will help your grad find biblical answers on their own—guidance that’s useful in any career.

1. International Critical Commentary: Save $388 with coupon code ICC13

The International Critical Commentary has long held a special place among works on the Bible. Its comprehensive, rigorous scholarship brings together all the relevant aids to exegesis: linguistic and textual, archaeological, historical, literary, and theological.

2. Tyndale Commentaries: Get 20% off with coupon code TYNDALE13

The Tyndale Commentary Series has long been a trusted resource for Bible study. Written by some of the world’s most distinguished evangelical scholars, the series offers clear, reliable, relevant exposition. [Read more...]

An Interview with Tony Reinke on John Newton’s Legacy

Get The Works of John Newton, vol. 1 as April’s free book of the month. But hurry—tomorrow’s the last day!

Today’s guest post is from Tony Reinke, author of Lit! A Christian Guide to Reading Books. Tony, a researcher, writer, and content strategist for Desiring God, lives with his wife and three children in Minneapolis.

What compelled you to begin researching John Newton?

For several years, I helped serve the pastors of a small denomination in the United States, and Newton was one of the historical men I chose to study as a way of becoming familiar with the questions and pressures of pastoral ministry. I found him very readable and relevant to the contemporary needs and challenges faced by pastors.

Newton was not theologically educated (formally), but he leveraged his biblical insight and his street smarts about the world and his own heart to all of Christian life and to his rich pastoral counsel. He is a unique voice in church history for that reason. And so I really got to know Newton over those years, and the deeper I dove into Newton’s letters, the more I loved reading his works. The more I read, the more I became impressed with the cohesion I saw in the fragments of his pastoral care. The more I began studying Newton, the more secondary sources I began to read, and the more secondary resources I read, the more clear it became how difficult of a time others have had in trying to fit Newton’s pastoral counsel together. The challenge of fitting his works together drew me in even further to his writings. [Read more...]