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Save 75% on the Logos March Madness Champion’s Works

Logos March Madness has come down to two authors: D. A. Carson vs. Martyn Lloyd-Jones.

You must vote today before 5 p.m. PST. The winner’s works will be discounted by 75%, and the runner-up’s works will be discounted by 60%. Vote now!

March Madness Champions

Don’t wait for a winner—save up to 50% now

Check out the works of some of this year’s best-selling authors:

Save 50% on titles by N. T. Wright and Charles Spurgeon

Save 45% on titles by Bruce Metzger and A. W. Tozer

Save 40% on titles by Darrell Bock and John Calvin

Save 35% on titles by Gordon Fee and John Owen

Save 30% on titles by Ben Witherington and James Montgomery Boice

Vote now, and be sure to check out all of this year’s deals.

9 Inspirational Quotes from the Early Church

1500 Quotations for PreachersIn January, we announced 1,500 Quotations for Preachers, a five-volume series of quotations from throughout church history. These quotations are extremely helpful in putting together sermons, and can easily be pulled into presentations with the provided quotation slides.

Here are nine inspiring quotes from the Early Church volume:

  1. Tertullian on persecution: “The more often we are mown down by you, the more in number we grow; the blood of Christians is seed.”
  2. Jerome on Scripture reading and prayer: “Let the divine scripture be always in your hands, and give yourself so frequently to prayer that such shafts of evil thoughts as ever assail the young may thereby find a shield to repel them.”
  3. Augustine on procrastination: “God has promised pardon to your conversion; He has not promised a tomorrow to your delay.”
  4. Chrysostom on reconciliation: “We are commanded to have only one enemy, the devil. With him never be reconciled! But with a brother, never be at enmity in your heart.”
  5. Athanasius on the renewal of creation: “The renewal of creation has been the work of the self-same Word that made it at the beginning.”
  6. Cyril of Jerusalem on God’s mercy: “Your accumulated offenses do not surpass the multitude of God’s mercies; your wounds do not surpass the great physician’s skill.”
  7. Gregory of Nazianzus on God’s greatness: “No one has yet breathed the whole air, nor has any mind entirely comprehended, or speech exhaustively contained, the being of God.”
  8. Syncletica of Alexandria on the integrity of teachers: “A man whose house is about to fall down may invite travelers inside to refresh them, but instead they are hurt in the collapse of the house. It is the same with teachers who have not carefully trained themselves in the good life: they ruin their hearers as well as themselves.”
  9. Irenaeus on truth and error: “Error, indeed, is never set forth in its naked deformity, lest, being thus exposed, it should at once be detected. But it is craftily decked out in an attractive dress, so as by its outward form, to make it appear to the inexperienced (ridiculous as the expression may seem) more true than the truth itself.”

Be sure to pick up 1,500 Quotations for Preachers before the price goes up April 9!

Of Flying Spiders and Theologians

Jonathan_EdwardsWhile flying spiders may sound like something gamers would blast in the latest Xbox game, one young man saw in them the wisdom of God.

The technical term for how spiders seem to fly across a distance is ballooning. That observer noted of their flight “the exuberant goodness of the Creator, who hath not only provided for the necessities, but also for the pleasure and recreation of all sorts of creatures, even the insects.”

Those eyes self-trained to see the extraordinary hiding amid the ordinary belonged to Jonathan Edwards. His first published work, in 1723, examined the curious aerial habits of field spiders, a lowly creature ignored by the less discerning.

Looking for enlightenment in what others missed marked Edwards. Following his conversion at 17, he applied scientific observation to the study of both natural and spiritual realms. When the Holy Spirit fell upon his congregation in the early days of the Great Awakening, Edwards called on his understanding of science and the Spirit to observe and record the happenings. Later, that synergy helped Edwards make sense of this great move of God.

The great take risks, both in science and in the Christian life. For Edwards, detailing the workings of God in the lives of men and women put him at odds with established religious thought. Even the congregation he served for 20 years failed to grasp what Edwards understood of the work of the Spirit in the life of the believer. The man who many today consider America’s greatest theologian was dismissed in 1750.

Edwards tested the limits of physical science, too, occasionally offering himself as test subject. As an example to the Native Americans he loved and to whom he preached, Edwards embraced the relatively new science of inoculations to prevent disease. Risk is no respecter of persons, however. On March 22, 1758, a botched smallpox inoculation delivered the 54-year-old Jonathan Edwards into the arms of the Lord.

It’s not just field spiders people pass by without notice. Life in the Spirit goes unexamined by most.

“No man is more relevant to the present condition of Christianity than Jonathan Edwards,” wrote D. Martyn Lloyd-Jones. Indeed, the greatest need in the church today may be for the spiritual “scientist” who observes, tests, and comprehends the signs of the times.

Jonathan Edwards saw. And he understood.

Be the Edwards of today through the spiritual observations of the Edwards of yesteryear. Find that
wisdom in The Works of Jonathan Edwards.

Because the spiritual wisdom of the past unlocks the gateway to the future.

Today’s guest post is by Dan Edelen. Dan writes from his farm in southwest Ohio, where he lives with his wife and son. Since 2003, his blog, Cerulean Sanctum, has been challenging believers to question the status quo. Yet for all Dan’s online gravitas, people who meet him in person are more likely to comment on his NFL linebacker size, his fixation with board games, and his love of laughter.

Save $100 on the Paul’s Letters Collection

Paul's LettersTo celebrate shipping Lexham Bible Guides: Colossians, the latest installment of the Paul’s Letters Collection, we’re giving you $100 off the collection’s regular price. Paul’s letters are full of rich theological material and practical advice—and perhaps that’s why these beloved parts of Scripture can be so difficult to comprehend. Even Peter recognized this, when he said, “There are some things in them that are hard to understand” (2 Pet. 3:15–16).

Grasp these difficult but important portions of the Bible

Each chapter of the Lexham Bible Guides includes six sections. The “Overview” and “Structure” sections introduce you to a specific passage by briefly summarizing and providing an outline. The “Place within the Book” section explains the immediate literary context and shows how the passage fits into Paul’s argument as a whole. The “Place within the Canon” section goes further by illustrating how Paul’s words fit into the broader context of biblical theology.

“Issues at a Glance” provides you with a quick guide to the major issues in Paul’s letters. It includes a summary of the varying points of view for each issue, along with an annotated list describing which views are held by the top commentaries or other resources. This list includes a summary of the arguments made by each individual author, providing you with the scholarly opinions you may not otherwise have access to. It also provides links to each of the resources discussed, so you can jump right to the relevant section of any Logos resources you own.

Learn relevant cultural context

In addition to the summary of major issues, the “Issues at a Glance” section also includes studies of key Greek words and background studies explaining relevant historical and cultural information. Finally, the “Application Overview” offers you a way to relate the passage to your life or the lives of those you are teaching.

Lexham Bible Guides: Paul’s Letters Collection gives you the tools you need to understand the key issues in Paul’s letters. By summarizing research and presenting it in a clear and concise manner, the collection serves as a quick and easy-to-use guide to these important books. Lexham Bible Guides help you go deeper in the Word without spending countless hours on research.

When you purchase this collection, the volumes on Galatians, Ephesians, Colossians, 1 Thessalonians, 2 Thessalonians, and Philemon will download immediately, and the remaining volumes will be released as they become available.

Order the Lexham Bible Guides: Paul’s Letters Collection by April 4 using the coupon code LBGPLC, and you’ll receive $100 off the regular price.

Last Chance: Free Book on Community Pricing!

F. W. Farrar’s The Messages of the Book has been on Community Pricing for a of couple weeks. To help people get acquainted with how Community Pricing works, we’re giving it to everyone who places a successful bid. The book will only be available until the end of March, so time is running out!

Frederic William Farrar (1831–1903) was an Anglican minister who wrote both fiction and nonfiction. Farrar’s The Messages of the Books is a wonderful look at New Testament origins, the relationship between the Synoptic Gospels, and much more.

Don’t miss your chance to own this classic volume! If your bid is successful, when this becomes available for download, you’ll get it for free. Bid today!

How Does Community Pricing Work?

Check out this helpful video to learn how Community Pricing works. Then try it out for yourself!

Hear about new Community Pricing titles

To hear about all the latest Community Pricing titles and collections that we make available, sign up with your email address.





4 Ways Textual Criticism Can Aid Bible Study

Have you ever wondered why various versions of the Bible read differently? For example, why does Romans 8:1 in the King James Version include a phrase that’s not in the New American Standard Bible or the New International Version? Did it get added to one or left out of the others? You may look to the footnotes of your Bible to learn a little about these differences, but what you find is not enough to answer your real questions: Why are there differences? How do we know which choice is best?

A new book by Logos Bible Software answers these questions and helps you learn the basics of textual criticism, the process of analyzing and evaluating differences in the text of the Bible. Textual Criticism is the first volume in the Lexham Method Series, and there are four ways it can help your Bible study. You will:

  1. Make sense of the textual footnotes in your Bibles. Many English Bibles include footnotes that say things like, “Some manuscripts do not include . . .” or “Dead Sea Scroll, Septuagint, Syriac, Vulgate; Masoretic Text ‘And it shall be.’” Textual Criticism will teach you how to decode and understand the significance of these notes.
  2. Understand the difficulty of producing a Bible translation. A new English translation of the Bible seems to come out every few years, and you might wonder how there can be so many translations of the same book. Textual Criticism will help you understand the decisions made by translation teams, and how these decisions affect the final product.
  3. Interact more intelligently with commentaries when they discuss textual issues. When you use commentaries in your Bible study, you encounter discussions about ways a particular text can be translated and why one reading is better than another. Commentators talk about Codex Vaticanus, the Peshitta, and the Dead Sea Scrolls—more language that needs decoding. Textual Criticism will teach you to understand the differences between the various manuscripts and decide when to trust one source over another.
  4. Learn to use your Logos software to do basic textual criticism on your own. In chapters 3 and 4 of Textual Criticism, you’ll work step by step through several passages in the Old and New Testaments that have textual issues. The examples will walk you through the process of textual criticism and show you how to use your Logos software to understand the significance of the Hebrew and Greek Bibles.

The Bible we have today has come to us through a long process that is unfamiliar to most Bible students. Textual Criticism helps you understand the basics of that process and navigate difficulties in the text. If you’re a serious student of the Bible, you need these tools to make the most of your study. The Lexham Methods Series is on currently on Pre-Pub. Pre-order now to receive a $50 discount from the regular price.

Save on Hundreds of Titles—Round 3 Begins

March MadnessLogos March Madness began with 64 authors, and we’re now down to just 16. Voting for Round 3 is now open—vote now!

Over 400 titles are now on sale! Here’s a quick breakdown:

Round 1 features works from 32 authors at a 30% discount. Featured authors include:

  • R. T. Kendall
  • J. C. Ryle
  • June Hunt
  • C. K. Barrett

Get Round 1 deals!

Round 2 features works from 16 authors at a 35% discount. Featured authors include:

  • Warren Wiersbe
  • Craig Blomberg
  • J. B. Lightfoot
  • Dwight Lyman Moody

Get Round 2 deals!

By voting for your favorite author, you’re moving their works closer to a 75% discount!

Ways to help your favorite author win:

Each author from this round is guaranteed a 40% discount on a selection of their works—but if they advance, that discount increases to 45%. Vote now!

4 Outstanding Reformed Systematic Theologies

Of the similarities between natural science and systematic theology, Charles Hodge writes: “If the object of the one be to arrange and systematize the facts of the external world, and to ascertain the laws by which they are determined; the object of the other is to systematize the facts of the Bible, and ascertain the principles or general truths which those facts involve.” Similarly, Michael Horton, in his The Christian Faith: A Systematic Theology for Pilgrims on the Way, writes that systematic theology “is like the box top of a jigsaw puzzle, and every believer is a theologian in the sense of putting the pieces together. If we fail to recognize there is a box top (i.e., a unified whole) to Scripture, we will have only a pile of pieces.”

John Calvin’s Institutes of the Christian Religion

For nearly 500 years, Calvin’s Institutes has been a bastion of Reformed systematic theology. Calvin wrote the first edition in Latin in the mid–sixteenth century, with a French edition published shortly thereafter; several English translations have appeared through the nineteenth century from both the Latin and the French editions. The Institutes is comprehensive and surprisingly pastoral, originally meant as an introduction to Christian faith and doctrine. Calvin’s magnum opus is still used in seminaries around the world today, and several translations are available in Logos, including the definitive English translation by John McNeill, available for pre-order.

Francis Turretin’s Institutes of Elenctic Theology

Francis Turretin pastored a church in Geneva, and was known as a strong defender of orthodox Calvinism. His seminal work is often called one of the most undervalued systematic theologies in Reformed history. Institutes of Elenctic Theology has been praised by the likes of Richard Gaffin, John Frame, James Boice, Wayne Grudem, and Norman Geisler. These volumes were required reading at old Princeton, and were dutifully studied by such giants in systematics as Charles Hodge, B. B. Warfield, and Louis Berkhof. R. Scott Clark writes, “One of the greatest of the seventeenth-century Reformed dogmatic works, it has retained its influence through its use at old Princeton. These three volumes put in your hands an excellent representative of high Reformed orthodoxy and polemical theology.” See it on Pre-Pub.

Benedict Pictet’s Christian Theology

Pictet, like Turretin and Calvin before him, also hailed from Geneva. His Christian Theology is a well-organized and convincing presentation of theology. Anyone familiar with, for instance, Warfield’s views on plenary inspiration will recognize the same strain of thought in Pictet’s writings, and will find excellent hermeneutics and exegesis employed in Pictet’s use of Scripture, out of which all his theology flows. This excellent volume is now available for pre-order.

Geerhardus Vos’ Reformed Dogmatics

A couple hundred years later, Geerhardus Vos wrote this remarkable systematic theology. Vos wrote in Dutch, but the English translation (with Dr. Richard Gaffin leading the translation team) is available for pre-order. Like Turretin’s Institutes, Vos’ Reformed Dogmatics is written in a succinct Q&A format, which makes it an immensely helpful reference tool and research aid. Here’s an excerpt, demonstrating Vos’ brevity and clarity:

“What is the relation between God’s decree, His free knowledge, and the free actions of men?
God’s decree grounds the certainty of His free knowledge and likewise the occurring of free actions. Not foreknowledge as such but the decree on which it rests makes free actions certain.”

Want More Systematics?

Check out the volumes mentioned above, plus more, on Community Pricing and Pre-Pub. Help us get these important systematic theologies into Logos!

Leave us a comment and tell us about your favorite systematic theology!

Preach Powerful Stories with Studies in Faithful Living

Studies in Faithful LivingFor many churchgoers, preaching represents the most important Bible study time of the week. For pastors, this creates a great sense of responsibility to use that time wisely and effectively. It can be challenging to unify a church through a study that balances engagement with depth. This is why Logos created the Studies in Faithful Living series, featuring Abraham, Jacob, Joseph, and Mary. Each volume comes as a complete church curriculum with sermon resources to simplify your sermon preparation and provide you with solid teaching tools.

The preaching resources include eight sermon outlines to equip you to preach powerful stories from the lives of the patriarchs and Mary. The sermon outlines are beautifully crafted and designed to complement and reinforce the small group lesson material found in the individual study version. At the same time, the sermons expand that material for your message, focusing on exhortation and application as well as interpretation and theology.

Each sermon also includes a teaching slideshow. With graphics, Scriptures, and reflection questions, the slideshows allow you to engage your congregation visually. The slideshows can be used as-is, or you can customize them to your own presentation style. Thumbnails of each slide appear within the sermon outline, providing a visual reference for you as you preach. Available in PowerPoint, Keynote, and Proclaim, they’re easy to use right out of the box.

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The included sermon outline handouts allow you to encourage your congregation in note-taking. In addition, an introductory sermon video and a set of graphics for the series offer your staff the tools they need to promote the sermon series.

The Studies in Faithful Living series is an engaging, thought-provoking curriculum that serves the entire church. Everyone benefits from studying the Word of God together, and these resources free up time and energy for pastors and teachers to turn their attention to the personal connections so essential for discipleship. Bring your church together around the Word with the Mary: Devoted to God’s Plan: Complete Church Curriculum or the Studies in Faithful Living: Patriarchs Collection today!

Geerhardus Vos: Father of Reformed Biblical Theology

Geerhardus Vos, the “father of Reformed biblical theology,” was born 151 years ago this month. Vos, a professor of biblical theology at Princeton, lectured alongside many famous theologians, including J. Gresham Machen, B. B. Warfield, and Abraham Kuyper. So great was Vos’ academic insight that Kuyper offered him the chair of Old Testament studies at the Free University of Amsterdam when Vos was just 24.

Currently in translation into English for the first time ever, Vos’ Reformed Dogmatics is an important expression of his Reformed theology. Originally published by Vos in 5 volumes, it represents the early thought of one of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries’ premiere Reformed thinkers.

Individual titles:

  • Reformed Dogmatics: Theology Proper
  • Reformed Dogmatics: Anthropology
  • Reformed Dogmatics: Christology
  • Reformed Dogmatics: Soteriology
  • Reformed Dogmatics: Ecclesiology, The Means of Grace, Eschatology

Reformed Dogmatics begins with an examination of the doctrine of God—his knowability, names, being, and character. Vos discusses the evidence for the Trinity in Scripture, explores human nature, sin, and the covenant of grace, and discusses the natures and incarnation of Christ.  Finally, he takes a look at the work of Christ, as well as the church’s nature and purpose. The result is some of the most profound systematic theology of the twentieth century.

Here’s what other scholars said about Vos:

“Dr. Vos was the greatest pedagogue I ever sat under.”—Cornelius Van Til

“. . . the most penetrating exegete it has been my privilege to know.”—John Murray

“Vos’ insights are penetrating, refreshing, and orthodox.” —James T. Dennison Jr.

Don’t miss this important piece of Reformed theology—pre-order now and save 22%!