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What’s Baptism, and What Does the Bible Say?

base packagesNo matter your denomination, you’ve probably asked (or have been asked) what baptism is. It’s been a point of controversy for centuries. Why do we baptize? When do we baptize? How should we baptize? What is baptism anyway?

One really awesome thing about Logos 5 is its ability to connect you to every Bible verse on baptism (and thousands of other things). This way, you can dig into the Word and see what it says about important issues.

What the Bible says about baptism

Let’s say you’re listening to (or crafting) a message on Ephesians 4 and you come to verse 5: “one Lord, one faith, one baptism.”

You might wonder, “What is baptism—really?” It’s easy to start exploring what the Bible says.

Start with a Bible Word Study

This is a smart way to get the definition of the word before diving into everything the Bible says about the practice. Just right-click “baptism” and run a Bible Word Study on the lemma. (What is a lemma? Find out here.)

Baptism

This will bring you definitions from all your Greek dictionaries and show you every place where your Bible mentions this Greek word. You’ll see that the word literally means “to dip” or “immerse,” but obviously there’s more to baptism than being underwater.

Next step: the Topic Guide

Now it’s time to get a better feel for the subject. You can open the Topic Guide, enter “baptism,” and immediately see key passages on baptism and a host of related topics, verses, media, events, and more!

The Topic Guide is one of the big time-saving features of Logos 5. It connects you to plenty of information on a single topic in seconds! You could stop here, but some folks may want to do even more Bible study on baptism.

If that’s you, you’ll love running a Morph Search.

Now let’s get the big picture

You have an idea of what the word “baptism” means. Now we get at the real question: what is baptism? One way you can know is by using Scripture to interpret Scripture: find every time the Bible mentions the word “baptize,” “baptism,” “Baptist,” etc. Sound extensive and complicated? Good news: it’s really easy to do: just run a Morph Search for the root!

Baptism II

This brings you every single mention of the Greek root in your Bible! Plus you can grab its uses in multiple translations. If you prefer the ESV and you want to share what you find with a NASB fan, it’s really easy to do.

Baptism III

Just by using these simple Logos 5 tools, you’ve found every time the Bible uses this word for baptism. You’re ready to study what baptism means for yourself!

Get established in the Word with Logos 5

Baptism is just one topic you can study for yourself with Logos. If you don’t already have Logos 5, get it now.

If you want to learn more about how to get established in the Word using Logos, sign up to hear about our educational resources!





Wish You Knew Paul Better? Now You Can!

Arguably, with the exceptions of Jesus and David, we have an opportunity to know Paul through the biblical text better than any other biblical character. Yet, he remains a mystery—distorted by the breadth and depth of his writings, the often confusing nature of the Acts account of Paul’s ministry, and the reams of literature written on Paul’s letters.

We need a guide through Paul’s letters.

We want to be grounded in the historicity and culture of his world, and the connection points to Acts, while being guided through the various views on his writing—the details are many. But until recently, no such guide has existed. That’s why Logos created Lexham Bible Guides: Paul’s Letters Collection.

Lexham Bible Guides enhance your investment in Logos Bible Software, bring clarity to the vastness of literature regarding a passage, and connect you linguistically, culturally, and historically to the context of biblical books.

Derek R. Brown, PhD, specializing in Paul, is bringing clarity and connection to the print equivalent of rows upon rows, shelves upon shelves—entire sections of libraries—of literature. He has done some of this work with the accompaniment of other researchers and under the editorship of Douglas Mangum, an Old Testament specialist—Paul draws upon the Old Testament often—and contributing editor to Faithlife Study Bible. This task is arduous, and that’s why we’ve done it for you.

For years, users (perhaps even yourself) have asked us to curate the vastness of their libraries—there’s just so much information. We have received requests to have a scholar filter through all of the content and provide a hand-edited framework for passages of the Bible; specific ideas have involved the recommendation of leveraging the content users already own and telling them about other content thus providing an even clearer way to approach the Bible. We know that time is short and we all need more of it. You want an expert to help you and want that expert on call 24-7. That’s what Lexham Bible Guides are for.

Lexham Bible Guides provide the research, the guide, and the media for sharing much of the material—this leaves the part you’re best at up to you. It’s like having a professional researcher alongside you as you read the Bible. If you’re not convinced yet, you can literally email me—the publisher—and I’ll tell you more.

This is the last chance to order Lexham Bible Guides: Paul’s Letters Collection, a 13-volume collection, while it’s on Pre-Pub for a 21% savings of $115. Tomorrow, February 8, we’ll process orders and ship you Galatians, Ephesians, 1 Thessalonians, 2 Thessalonians, and Philemon. As Dr. Brown finishes the others, they will also be released and immediately download to your library. Pre-order Lexham Bible Guides: Paul’s Letters Collection today.

Grow in Your Understanding of Genesis

Lexham Bible Guide: Genesis 12–50 is the largest Lexham Bible Guide yet. From God’s call on Abraham to Joseph’s death in Egypt, the volume addresses more than 200 exegetical, theological, and historical issues and offers 55 word studies, giving you insight into the interpretation of these foundational chapters. For each issue, we examine the viewpoints of top scholars and biblical interpreters, allowing you to gain a quick understanding without having to read through several commentaries.

In Lexham Bible Guide: Genesis 12–50, we engage with more than 25 Genesis commentaries as well as relevant dictionaries and journal articles, providing you with a breadth of opinions on the more than 200 issues discussed in the volume. Our summaries of these commentaries’ positions save you countless hours of reading and research and give you short excerpts of the viewpoints articulated in biblical scholarship.

For example, after Joseph rose to power in Egypt, he had two sons with his Egyptian wife (see Gen 41:50–52). Scholars disagree on the relevance of Joseph’s names for his sons. Here is an excerpt from the volume:

Manasseh and Ephraim

During the seven years of plenty, Joseph has two sons (Gen 41:50). The giving of names in the Bible and in the ancient Near East carried great significance. Here, the names Joseph gives his sons speak directly to his past struggles.

Joseph names his first son Manasseh (menashsheh), which means something like “one who causes to forget.” Joseph explains this name by saying, “God has made me forget (nashshani) all my trouble and all my father’s house” (Gen 41:51). He names his second son Ephraim, explaining that “God has made me fruitful in the land of my affliction” (Gen 41:52). Ephraim (ephrayim) is derived from parah, meaning “to be fruitful.”

Both names highlight the hardship of Joseph’s life (“my trouble” and “my affliction”) and God’s role in the success he is now enjoying (“God has made me forget” and “God has made me fruitful”). However, scholars disagree on how to understand the additional note about forgetting “all my father’s house.” Some view it negatively and argue that Joseph should have been looking to reconcile with his father. Others view this as Joseph’s desire to forget his past sufferings

  • McKeown argues that Joseph’s statement about forgetting “all the house of my father” indicates that he does not plan to seek out his family. He asserts that Joseph has a new family in Egypt and does not show interest in either reconciliation or revenge.
  • Sarna believes the phrase “all my trouble and all my father’s house” should be translated as “my suffering in my parental home.” He argues that Joseph is not forgetting his father’s home but is merely not allowing the troubles of his youth to intrude on his future.
  • Waltke notes that Joseph is “strangely indifferent” toward his father. He points out, though, that the narrator does not condemn Joseph for this. Waltke also argues that Joseph’s giving his sons Hebrew names instead of Egyptian names indicates that he has not forgotten his father’s house.
  • Westermann understands the phrase “and all my father’s house” to mean “I am far from my father’s house.” He asserts that the names Joseph chooses reveal his understanding that God has been with him (Gen 39:2–6, 21–23).

Lexham Bible Guide: Genesis 12–50 is available individually or as part of the Lexham Bible Guides: Genesis Collection. The collection is on sale for a limited time—only until February 14, when Lexham Bible Guide: Genesis 12–50 ships. Order now to get the lowest price on this collection, which will serve as your guide to Genesis for many years to come.

Free Book of the Month: Lewis Sperry Chafer’s Satan

“No subject was more dear to the heart of Dr. Lewis Sperry Chafer than the teaching of the Scriptures on the spiritual life.”—John F. Walvoord, president of Dallas Theological Seminary

Lewis Sperry Chafer’s Satan is February’s Free Book of the Month.

Drawing on Scripture, Chafer encourages believers to be aware of the enemy’s tactics and schemes. This volume is both a challenge and a comfort to those who are looking to better understand Satan’s history—and future!

Lewis Sperry Chafer was born in Rock Creek, Ohio, in 1871. A Presbyterian clergyman and educator, he founded the Evangelical Theological College, which we now know as Dallas Theological Seminary. He served the college as president and professor of systematic theology until his death in 1952.

You can get Chafer’s book free through the end of February, and when you visit the Free Book of the Month page, you can enter to win the nine-volume Lewis Sperry Chafer
Collection.

Visit the Free Book of the Month page to get your free book and enter the giveaway.

Enhance Your Sermon Prep with the Preacher’s Homiletic Commentary

HomileticPreparing a sermon ought to be a weighty matter. After all, God has entrusted us with “the gospel of glory” (1 Ti. 1:11) that we might grow and feed the people of God. One of our passions at Logos is giving you the tools and resources you need to faithfully expound the Word of God, and the Preacher’s Homiletic Commentary (38 vols.) on Community Pricing will be a great help.

The Preacher’s Homiletic Commentary was written to aid you in sermon preparation. Its 30 authors walk you through each passage in 55 books of the Bible, giving you expository insight and wisdom from a variety of thinkers, theologians, and pastors.

All 38 volumes are currently on Community Pricing, where you can bid what you’d be willing to pay. The current successful bid of $40 is only a few dollars more than what this entire collection sold for when this was originally published in 1892!

What Logos Users are Saying

“More spiritual insights, life applications, and quotable anecdotes than I have ever seen elsewhere in one set. This ‘buried treasure’ is like finding ‘gold nuggets of wisdom’ from the best preachers of yesteryear—this can change the lives of people today!”

“This has been one of my go-to sermon sets for years and years! I would love to see this on Logos!”

“This set is excellent for any pastor. Lots and lots of helps with expository preaching. Every young pastor needs this set. I can promise you that it will be dollars well spent.”

Don’t miss this opportunity to save 93% on a terrific commentary set, perfect for preaching, Bible study, and devotions alike—place your bid today!

It’s Time: You Won’t Get This Deal Again

Logos Base PackagesThis is it, folks: after Monday, the introductory upgrade deals available for Logos 5 will be gone forever.

Now is the time to upgrade. If you don’t upgrade now, you’re just leaving savings on the table. But if you do upgrade today, you’ll get the very best deal on Logos 5 you can.

And the biggest savings go to those who get our biggest, best base packages: Portfolio and Diamond.

Portfolio: Best Package, Best Deal

It’s the largest, most robust base package we could put together. The Logos 5 team hand-picked the books that went into Portfolio—it’s a master library with master tools. There are lots of reasons it’s awesome, but here’s a short overview:

  • 2,585 resources—up from 1,669 resources in the Logos 4 version
  • A $78,000 value—up from $31,000 in Logos 4
  • All Logos 5 features
  • 18-month payment-plan option

If you’ve had your eye on Portfolio for a while, skip the rest of this post and get it now—you won’t have another chance to get this introductory deal on it!

Diamond2Diamond: a Smart New Upgrade Level

Second only to Portfolio, Diamond is for people who won’t settle for a puny library, but want to keep their bills low. It’s a solid upgrade choice that gives you lots of good stuff:

  • 2,028 resources—a library that would cost $52,500 in print!
  • All Logos 5 features
  • 18-month payment-plan option

Wish You’d Upgraded to Diamond or Portfolio?

You might be thinking, “Boy—I got Logos 5, but now I wish I’d upgraded to Diamond or Portfolio instead. Those savings are top-notch!”

Don’t worry: we’ll fix you up with the library (and corresponding savings) you really want. But this offer ends Monday, too.

Time’s Running Out: Save Right Now

You’ve heard about our introductory discounts, but here’s a refresher: you can save up to 25% when you upgrade to Logos 5. We’ll calculate a custom upgrade discount for you based on the library you already own (so you don’t pay for any books twice).

The time is now: once the introductory sale is over, it’s over. Get the best deal and upgrade to Logos 5 before it’s too late.

Kutless: “We Love Logos 5”

One of the perks of working at Logos is you never know who you’re going to run into in the hallways. Recently bestselling artists Kutless dropped in for a tour of the Logos campus.

It’s pretty fun to have high-profile visitors drop by, but it’s even more exciting when they’re just as enthusiastic about what we do as we are! Here’s Kutless’ Jon Micah Sumrall discussing the ways Logos 5 helps him dig into the Word and share it.

Logos 5 will revolutionize your Bible study

If you feel that your Bible study has plateaued, it’s time to look into Logos 5. With a base package, you’ll:

Our sales team is here to take your calls

Have a few questions? Want to talk to a real live person? Our sales team is here today (Saturday, January 26) from 6 a.m. to 5 p.m. (PST). Give us a call at 1-800-875-6467.

Or call us:

  • 6:00 a.m–9:00 p.m. (PST) January 28–February 1
  • 6:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m. (PST) February 2
  • 6:00 a.m.–9:00 p.m. (PST) February 4

Upgrade now and save!

Our introductory discounts run through February 4. With only a little while left to save big on a base package, now’s the time to get Logos 5. Check out our Custom Upgrade Discount Calculator to see how big a discount you qualify for—it might be bigger than you think.

Upgrade to Logos 5 today!

What’s a Lemma, and How’s It Used in Bible Study?

The word “lemma” shows up everywhere in original-language books and tools, including Logos 5 features—but what is a lemma?

Lemma

Obviously, it’s a key concept when it comes to digging deeper in Bible study.

So What Is a Lemma, Anyway?

A lemma is the dictionary term for the word you’re looking up. If you were to look up the word “jumping” in an English dictionary, you wouldn’t find it as a headword. What you would find is “jump,” the word that represents “jump,” “jumping,” “jumped,” and “jumps.” In this case “jump” is the lemma.

What’s So Important about Lemmas in Bible Study?

Because Logos ties biblical words to their lemmas, you can search the Bible by a word’s meaning, not just by the word itself.

For example, let’s say I’m studying Mark 4:35–41. In this passage, Jesus and his disciples set sail across the Sea of Galilee. A violent storm arises and threatens to sink the boat. Jesus then says to the wind and sea, “Hush, be still” (NASB), and the storm immediately calms.

The word “hush” in verse 39 is interesting to me, probably because other translations (like the ESV and KJV) use the word “peace” instead. I wonder, “how is this word used in the rest of the New Testament?” I have my Reverse Interlinear panel open in Logos 5, so I see two Greek words listed under “hush.”

Lemma II

But if I look up the lemma, I can find all the different forms tied to the lemma. I can right-click the word “hush,” and run a Bible Word Study report on the lemma right from my Bible . . .

Lemma III

. . . and see the verb used in six different ways across the New Testament!

Lemma IV

 

A lemma is the basic dictionary form of the word you’re interested in, and it’s your ticket to a deeper understanding of the text you’re studying.

Upgrade to Logos 5 now!

With Logos 5, you have the most cutting-edge features available for Bible study. Upgrade now and see how you can take your word studies to the next level. But hurry—introductory discounts expire February 4.

Free Greek and Latin Manuscripts on Pre-Pub

We’re happy to announce that you can pre-order Codex Bezae Cantabrigiensis for free!

Theodore Beza, John Calvin’s successor as leader of the Genevan church, first presented this uncial codex to the library at the University of Cambridge (Cantabrigia in Latin, from which the latter part of the codex’s name originated) in 1581. Believed to have been penned in the late or early fourth and fifth century, Codex Bezae contains the four Gospels, Acts, and the last several verses of 3 John. It is a unique manuscript with many peculiarities, from the license taken in adding, rephrasing, and omitting portions of text to the fact that it contains both Greek and Latin text, arranged in “sense-lines” and facing each other on opposite pages.

Important and Unique

Codex Bezae Cantabrigiensis, Matthew 11:10-21

This important text has played a fascinating role in textual criticism and canonical studies. It is the oldest-known manuscript containing the story of the adulterous woman
found in John 7–8, as well as a longer ending of the Gospel of Mark. There are also several apparent additions, including a story found nowhere else of Jesus addressing a man found working on the Sabbath. For centuries, scholars have been intrigued by this manuscript’s implications and the information it gives about the written culture of fourth- and fifth-century Christianity.

Powerful in Logos

With Codex Bezae Cantabrigiensis in Logos, you have a powerful combination—not only because of the numerous grammars, journal articles, apparatuses, and commentaries that reference this resource, but also because of Logos’ powerful search capabilities, and the original-language tools and resources at your fingertips.

Whether you’re interested in the history of translation and early Christianity or you’re a veteran of textual criticism, this free resource will make a valuable addition to your Logos library. Don’t miss this chance to get a digital edition of this historical manuscript for free—pre-order Codex Bezae Cantabrigiensis today at no cost!

Why You Shouldn’t Wait until the Next Version to Upgrade

Logos Base PackagesWith many products, it makes sense not to upgrade with each new version that comes out. Whether it’s phones, tablets, or software, most people don’t need to upgrade to every new version.

As an owner of Adobe’s Creative Suite, I’ve often had to wrestle with the question of whether to upgrade or sit out a round. The only thing I miss out on if I skip a version is the use of the new features for the next year or two. When the next version comes out, I’ll get all the new features from both versions. I’ll have the same set of tools as the person who upgrades with each new version.

Some of you may be approaching upgrading to Logos 5 this way. On the surface, it seems like a good way to save some money. And while it makes sense in a lot of categories, I’d like to explain why it doesn’t make sense with our base packages.

In most cases, new products exclusively build on top of, add to, and improve old ones. They get thinner, lighter, faster, more space, longer battery life, more features, etc. When products merely add to the ones they replace, you can often get by fine with upgrading every other release cycle—assuming the new features aren’t essential for you to have right away.

But Logos base packages don’t work that way. We certainly add many new features, datasets, and books with each new release. But in order to make room for all the new books we add, we also take many books out.

We do this for several reasons. Sometimes we just want to freshen our packages up so people who upgrade can add more new books to their libraries. Other times publishers request to have their content removed and want to try selling it individually. Regardless of the reasons, the result is that each new generation of base packages provides a one-time opportunity to pick up thousands of dollars of content for about ten cents on the dollar.

Let me illustrate with Logos 4. People who sat out and didn’t upgrade to Logos 4 missed out on the opportunity to get the following content at base package prices:

Books # of Volumes Print Value Logos Price
Semeia: An Experimental Journal for Biblical Criticism 91 $2,195 $49.95
A. W. Pink Collection 40 $603 $249.95
Berkouwer’s Studies in Dogmatics 14 $450 $329.95
Pillar New Testament Commentary 8 $311 $249.95
The Encyclopedia of Christianity: Volumes 1–4 4 $300 $289.95
Great Doctrines of the Bible 3 $45 $29.95
Exegetical Dictionary of the New Testament 3 $150 $139.95
Wuest’s Word Studies & Wuest’s Expanded NT 2 $99.95 $75.95
A Popular Account of the Ancient Egyptians 2 $59.98 $49.95
Theological Wordbook of the Old Testament 1 $49.95 $49.95
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible 1 $45 $45
Bible History: Old Testament 1 $29.95 $29.95
Theological Dictionary of the New Testament 1 $59.95 $59.95
The Teacher’s Bible Commentary 1 $50 $50

You could have purchased Logos 4 Platinum for less than it would cost you to just purchase these 14 selections at Logos.com prices (not to mention the more than 170 other volumes removed from Platinum). If this is content you’d ever want to buy, it certainly makes sense not to have skipped upgrading to Logos 4. In total, we removed over $6,400 worth of content from base package libraries. The same thing will be true with a different set of content in Logos 5 when the next version comes out.

Get Logos 5 now!

Act now and get thousands of dollars’ worth of books at a fraction of their Logos.com prices. This content might not be available in the next iteration of our software. It’s not too late to get an incredible deal on a Logos 5 upgrade, but you have to act soon. Our introductory discounts end February 4. Upgrade now!