Now Updated: Analytical Bible Expositor, Baylor Handbook, and More

analytical-bible-expositorWe’ve recently updated some of our most popular collections and series to include all the most recent volumes. It’s easy to make sure you’re up to date: if you already own volumes in a collection, you’ll get a custom Dynamic Pricing discount. As long as you’re logged in, the product page will display your custom price!

Why not get the volumes you’re missing?

Here are the most recent updates:

1. Analytical Bible Expositor (24 vols.)

You can finally get the Analytical Bible Expositor—previously only available as individual volumes or smaller sets—as a single, discounted collection. To celebrate, we’re offering even deeper discounts for a limited time. Just use coupon code ANALYTICALBIBLE through March 31 to get 10% off your purchase or upgrade!

2. Baylor Handbook Series (13 vols.)

Updated to offer the Hebrew and Greek collections in one complete set, the Baylor Handbook Series is now even more useful. For just $299.95 (or, if you already own some volumes, much less!), get all 13 volumes and start understanding the Bible’s linguistic and grammatical nuance.

church-and-postmodern-culture-series3. Church and Postmodern Culture Series (7 vols.)

We’ve combined the original five-volume collection and its two-volume upgrade: now you’ll find all seven volumes in one place, at one great price. Study contemporary theology alongside postmodern culture, and get a better understanding of where the church is headed.

4. Drama of Scripture Trilogy

Craig G. Bartholomew and Michael W. Goheen have teamed up to provide an introductory look at the present and future of theology in modern society: the Drama of Scripture Trilogy, which applies a Christian worldview to the biblical story, to systematic philosophy, and to postmodern culture. These volumes make excellent studies for small groups, personal reading, and academic papers, and they’re only growing more relevant. Now you can get them bundled together for much less than you’d pay for all the individual volumes.

Update your collections today!

Get 45% Off Round 4 Titles!

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Logos March Madness is down to the Final 4! The rounds are getting closer and closer—this is anyone’s game. If you want to see your favorite author win, vote right now, and be sure to rally your friends for more support!

Save 45% on round 4 resources

Right now, you can get 45% off select titles by:

Who will advance to the championships?

This round only lasts until Tuesday; after that, the top two authors advance to the championship round. Here are the authors battling for the championship spots:

  • Gordon Fee
  • D. A. Carson
  • Martyn Lloyd-Jones
  • Charles Spurgeon

Who are your favorites?

Get your votes in at LogosMarchMadness.com, and then check out the complete list of discounts!

Understand Early Christianity’s Roman Context

the-history-of-the-decline-and-fall-of-the-roman-empire

“In the second century of the Christian era, the Empire of Rome comprehended the fairest part of the earth, and the most civilised portion of mankind. The frontiers of that extensive monarchy were guarded by ancient renown and disciplined valour. The gentle but powerful influence of laws and manners had gradually cemented the union of the provinces. Their peaceful inhabitants enjoyed and abused the advantages of wealth and luxury.”
—Edward Gibbon, The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire

“At the hour of midnight the Salerian gate was silently opened, and the inhabitants were awakened by the tremendous sound of the Gothic trumpet. Eleven hundred and sixty-three years after the foundation of Rome, the Imperial city, which had subdued and civilised so considerable a part of mankind, was delivered to the licentious fury of the tribes of Germany and Scythia.”
—Gibbon, The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire

The rise and fall of imperial Rome constitute one of the most important narratives in Western history—Christian history in particular. The Romans contributed core elements to government, politics, art, engineering, and almost everything else we know as modern. Under Nero, Maximinus Thrax, and Decius, Rome subjected Christians to atrocities. Under Constantine, Rome helped Christianity flourish.

If you’re studying Christianity and overlooking Rome, you’re overlooking essential context.

Study Rome from its rise to its fall

Logos offers several important resources on ancient Rome—in particular, Polybius’ The Histories, Appian’s Roman History, Livy’s History of Rome, Cassius Dio’s Roman History, and Edward Gibbon’s History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire. Together, these works set you up to study Roman history from its beginning to its end.

1. Rome’s rise

polybius-the-historiesPolybius’ The Histories gives you a fascinating look at Rome’s ascent between 264 and 146 BC. The Greek historiographer analyzes all the factors that contributed to Rome’s dominance: above all, strong leadership, the separation of powers, and advantages of geography.

Right now, The Histories is on Pre-Pub for 22% off, and the price is about to go up. You’ll want to pre-order this one right now.

2. Rome’s zenith

  • Appian’s Roman History is the only surviving account of the Roman civil wars, which were enormously important to Rome’s trajectory overall. Appian doesn’t name his sources outright, but scholars agree that Appian built on the work of Polybius; Logos lets you study these Roman histories side by side. And if you bid now, you can get Roman History for 73% off.
  • Livy’s History of Rome surveys Rome’s history from its mythical founding to the reign of Augustus. Livy offers narrative, not just chronology; in fact, books 1–10 and 21–30 have become defining examples of Golden Age Latin. Right now, History of Rome is on Community Pricing for a full 85% off!
  • Cassius Dio’s Roman History covers 1,400 years, from the founding of Rome to AD 229. Dio really shines in his treatment of events after the first century BC, many of which he witnessed firsthand; his account is unmatched in detail. You can get Dio’s Roman History for 78% off on Community Pricing.

3. Rome’s fall

Edward Gibbons classic History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire is by far the most famous work on ancient Rome, and Gibbon devotes several chapters to Christianity in the Roman world. In a 1997 review, History of the Christian Church magazine noted that “for fullness and general accuracy and artistic representation [Gibbon’s] work is still unsurpassed”; years earlier, no less a rhetor than Winston Churchill credited Gibbon’s lofty style with influencing his own. History of the Decline and Fall is a remarkable overview of the factors that contributed to Rome’s undoing and the lessons that Roman history holds for world powers today. Plus, at $17.95, it’s an astonishing value.

Study Roman context with the best resources

Most of these works are on Community Pricing, which means that prices are going up very soon. Likewise, Polybius’ The Histories is on Pre-Pub, but it won’t be for long—if you’re at all interested in the ancient world, you should pre-order it now.

Pre-order Polybius’ The Histories right now, and add a more modern perspective with Gibbon’s History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire.
 

Then keep reading—how did Augustine influence philosophy?

Why Browse When You Can Pinpoint?

lexham-bible-guides-pauls-letters-collection (1)When I was in college, I dreaded embarking on any kind of heavy-duty research project. What should have been the most exciting part of the learning process became a nightmare—I would comb through countless books to find even a scrap of relevant data. I quickly learned that looking at the sources top scholars reference in their own work would lead me to the most pertinent information. But those of us who are already stretched thin by other responsibilities—ministry, family, career—simply don’t have time to spend hours in the library searching through the literature.

Revolutionize the way you research

The Logos platform overcomes these difficulties. With Logos’ interconnected library, I can quickly and easily find the best resources, leverage them for efficiency, and jumpstart my research process.

Look at the Lexham Bible Guides: Paul’s Letters Collection, for example. Logos’ professional research team has done all the heavy lifting. Each volume presents the most highly regarded scholarship, curated to represent all major viewpoints and annotated to provide the depth of information you’re seeking.

Say you want to research 1 Corinthians 13:1–3 to prepare a sermon or write an exegetical paper. Start digging and you’ll find a wealth of literature on these three verses—a daunting research challenge. With the Lexham Bible Guide: 1 Corinthians in hand, you hold the most relevant commentary on these verses, with scholars’ annotations and references right in line.

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If you have extra time or are especially curious about a particular argument, one click on the reference takes you directly to the original source. In just minutes, you can make headway on a project that would otherwise have taken hours.

The Lexham Bible Guides exemplify the primary goal of Lexham Press: to create efficient resources that reduce the time you spend preparing material, freeing you to pursue God’s other priorities for your life.

Start saving time today. Add the Lexham Bible Guides: Paul’s Letters Collection or the Lexham Bible Guides: Genesis Collection to your library!

Get Big Savings on the International Critical Commentary!

Thumb_59Right now, you can save big on one of our top-selling commentaries. Just use coupon code ICC2014 through the end of March to get the International Critical Commentary for 25% off!

The ICC has long held a special place among Bible commentaries. Its rigorous scholarship brings together linguistic, textual, archaeological, historical, literary, and theological aids to exegesis—everything you need to understand the Bible and its world.

Normally, it’s a hard series to purchase in its entirety—buying the print volumes individually gets expensive, numerous revisions make it hard to find the most recent volumes, and most retailers don’t even offer the set as a single product. The Logos edition provides a substantial discount, and its content is far more useful.

This is the best time to buy the ICC!

Right now is the very best time to get the ICC—combine the coupon-code discount, your Dynamic Pricing discount (if you already own volumes), and a payment plan and you’ve got one of the finest commentaries available, at an extremely affordable price. The Logos edition is already a much better deal than the print equivalent, and right now you can get an even deeper discount.

Who knows when you’ll see a price like this again—so don’t wait!

Use coupon code ICC2014 through March 31 to get over 25% off the International Critical Commentary.

Augustine’s Philosophical Importance

Augustine_of_HippoAugustine is a hugely important figure in church history. He’s a big deal outside the church, too—in fact, he’s one of the most important figures in pure philosophy.

Here’s why.

Augustine beat Kant to his theory of subjective time

Immanuel Kant (1724–1804) was one of the fathers of modern philosophy. He argued, among many other things, that time doesn’t exist outside consciousness—that it’s “nothing other than the form of inner sense.” That subjective view of time has proved hugely important. Thing is, Kant wasn’t the first to think of it—Augustine, in the third century AD, came to more or less the same conclusion in book XI of the Confessions.

The problem that started it all: given the Genesis 1 account of creation, shouldn’t creation have occurred sooner—that is, as soon as possible? Augustine argues that time itself was created when the world was created; God, eternal, is exempt from linear time and all notions of before and after. It’s here that Augustine beats Kant to the punch. “What, then, is time?” he wonders. “If no one asks of me, I know; if I wish to explain to him who asks, I know not.” He concludes that the present is all that really exists; the past exists only as memory; the future, as expectation. Time is in and of the human mind, and that’s Kant in a nutshell.

Augustine beat Descartes to his cogito

modern-philosophy-bundleCogito, ergo sum,” wrote René Descartes (1596–1650)—“I think, therefore I am.” Descartes resolved to doubt all that could be doubted, and concluded that pretty much all sensory input is subject to skepticism. That position admits as trustworthy only the bare fact of mental existence. (By the way, Descartes later concluded that his own extreme doubt, though possible, was unreasonable—since God is good, he wouldn’t lead us astray; therefore, the senses can be trusted.) Descartes’ cogito has been enormously influential.

But Augustine, in his Soliloquia, comes to the very same conclusion:

“You, who wish to know, do you know who you are? I know it. Whence are you? I know not. Do you feel yourself single or multiple? I know not. Do you feel yourself moved? I know not. Do you know that you think? I do.” (emphasis added)

Sorry, Descartes.

Augustine incorporated and modified Platonism

ancient-philosophy-bundleFor Augustine, the writings of Plato were “the most pure and bright in all philosophy, scattering the clouds of error”—in fact, Platonism helped bring Augustine to Christianity. Through Plotinus, Augustine adopted many of Plato’s teachings:

  • Augustine’s City of God is to his City of Man what Plato’s higher plane—the plane of forms—is to our lower world.
  • Plato believed in absolute, unchanging reality; for Augustine, this made Christianity’s radical claims, which he came to later in life, easier to accept.
  • Both thinkers treated logic and faith as complementary, not opposed.

What’s really interesting is that Augustine, unlike his Platonist predecessors, adapted Platonism into new philosophy that better conforms to Scripture. Let’s return to Genesis 1, for example. For Plato, and later Aristotle, creating something from nothing was unthinkable: in the Timaeus, Plato argued that a demiurge, or creator god, sculpted the universe’s forms from some preceding primitive matter. But Genesis is explicit—God created something from nothing—and so Augustine sees no room for confusion. Before him, Christian Platonists (like Origen) tended to incorporate Plato’s thought in whole; after him, Platonism answered to Scripture.

* * *

Augustine took the philosophy of the past and modified it for emerging Christianity. He developed original philosophy that prefigured the work of many of modernity’s most important thinkers. He’s important—and so is the larger conversation he’s such a big part of.

You can get the Logos editions (in both English and Latin) of Augustine’s Confessions and Select Letters for just $34.94—for such influential thought in such a research-friendly format, that’s a steal. Likewise, Noet’s Ancient and Modern Philosophy bundles give you the essential works of Kant, Descartes, Plato, and others.

Join the conversation: pick up Augustine’s Confessions and Select Letters, the Ancient Philosophy Bundle, and the Modern Philosophy Bundle right now.

Or start studying the ultimate classical library: Noet’s immense Classical Foundations Bundle, which gives you 124 volumes spanning philosophy, history, literature, and the classics.

 
Then keep reading—what do philosophy and theology have to do with math?

7 Must-Have Books on Early Christian Persecution

classic-studies-on-persecution-in-early-christianityAs Christianity crossed national and cultural borders and the number of believers multiplied, the religion showed its revolutionary potential and threatened Roman authority. To suppress the growing faith, the Roman government persecuted Christians in brutal ways.

It’s extremely important to know the context and stories behind Christianity’s early years. Here are seven books to guide you:

1. The Early Persecutions of the Christians

Leon Hardy Canfield walks you through topics like the legal basis of early persecutions, the persecution of Christians under Nero and Trajan, and more. This is a great, broad study on the persecutions faced by the early church.

2. Persecution in the Early Church: A Chapter in the History of Renunciation

This book examines the legal, historical, ecclesiastical, and experiential aspects of the early persecutions of Christians, emphasizing “those aspects of the inner life of the church which led to persecution.”

3. Christianity and the Roman Government: A Study in Imperial Administration

This book takes a close look at Roman history, allowing you to get a feel for what happened on both sides of the conflict.

4. The Conflict of Christianity with Heathenism

Based on the best in early-twentieth-century scholarship, this resource offers valuable insight into the struggles between early Christians and pagans.

5. The Valerian Persecution: A Study of the Relations between Church and State in the Third Century A. D.

Patrick J. Healy examines the conflict between Christianity and Rome in light of scholarship that reveals its roots in state policy and administration. In doing so, he illuminates the magnitude of the challenges early Christians faced in spreading a message with the power to revolutionize Rome and the world.

6. The Decian Persecution

One of few resources of its kind, this book follows the persecution of Christians under the rule of Emperor Decius.

7. The Persecution of Diocletian: A Historical Essay

Built around a paper that won the Hulsean Essay Prize in 1874, this resource presents a vivid picture of the Diocletian persecution and offers several innovative interpretations of the period’s historical records.

* * *

You don’t have to go out and buy all these books on their own. Right now, you can pre-order the Classic Studies on Persecution in Early Christianity collection, which gives you all seven titles, for just $69.95—that’s 30% off! Pre-order yours now.

Then check out the rest of our resources on Pre-Pub!

Explore the Ancient World with Cutting-Edge Archaeology Research

American-Schools-of-Oriental-ResearchWe’re pleased to announce a new partnership with The American Schools of Oriental Research (ASOR), an academic organization dedicated to the study and preservation of the culture and history of the Near East. Committed to “initiating, encouraging and supporting research into the culture of the Near East . . . and helping the public to understand the findings of that research,” ASOR plays a crucial role among academics working in the fields of archaeology and biblical and Near Eastern studies, as well as those outside the academy wishing to learn from their research.

For several decades, ASOR has published three academic journals, as well as a newsletter and monograph series. We recently listed several volumes of their journals on Pre-Pub. If you’re interested in biblical studies and archaeology, you’ll want these resources.

A must-have for Near Eastern studies

bulletin-of-the-american-schools-of-oriental-research

Founded in 1919, the Bulletin of the American Schools of Oriental Research is an interdisciplinary journal that includes articles about the Near East and the eastern Mediterranean world from the Paleolithic period through Islamic times. The journal features articles in a multitude of disciplines, including art and archaeology, history, anthropology, geography, philology and epigraphy, and literature. With an emphasis on the significance of archaeological discovery and excavation for understanding Near Eastern culture, BASOR provides cutting-edge research on the ancient world.

If academic writing and topics seem intimidating, rest assured that BASOR is designed to serve both lay and academic audiences. There’s simply no better way to get a sense of recent research in archaeology and biblical and Near Eastern studies.

Get the Bulletin of the American Schools of Oriental Research before the price goes up!

Interested in more from ASOR? Check out their other journals on Pre-Pub—Biblical Archaeologist / Near Eastern Archaeology (1992–2011) and the Journal of Cuneiform Studies (1993–2011).

Our Top Picks: Best Bible Commentaries

the-expositors-bible-commentaryOver the next few months, we’ll be highlighting some of the most popular products in each resource category on Logos.com. Today we start with commentaries.

Three reader favorites

It’s important to lean on the wisdom and experience of those who have come before us (Proverbs 11:14). Commentaries are one of the best ways to do just that:

“It seems odd, that certain men who talk so much of what the Holy Spirit reveals to themselves, should think so little of what he has revealed to others . . . It has been the fashion of late years to speak against the use of commentaries . . . A respectable acquaintance with the opinions of the giants of the past, might have saved many an erratic thinker from wild interpretations and outrageous inferences”
—Charles Spurgeon

Logos.com offers nearly three thousand commentaries. That’s a lot to choose from, so here are three of our most popular sets:

1. The Expositor’s Bible Commentary

The EBC gives you an analysis of each biblical book, plus an introduction, outline, and bibliography. The result is a well-rounded, accessible commentary recognized for excellence by an ECPA Gold Medallion Award. A team of 50 authors contributed their expertise, each articulating well-researched convictions while dealing fairly with opposing points of view.

word-biblical-commentary2. Word Biblical Commentary

For a more academic perspective, add the 59-volume Word Biblical Commentary to your Logos library. This huge set enjoyed universal acclaim in print, and now, networked with your other resources in the Logos format, it’s even more powerful. The WBC’s depth makes it one of Logos’ most sought-after series.

3. NIV Application Commentary

On every page, this newer set demonstrates how the truth of Scripture remains as relevant today as it ever was. Like many commentaries, it explains historical background and original-language nuance; more than that, though, it also offers pragmatic modern applications for the truth it unearths.

Coming soon . . .

We’re not done adding to our commentary library—there’s some great new content on the way. You can bid on or pre-order both of these sets right now!

Spurgeon Commentary Collection: New Testament Letters

Charles Spurgeon wrote formal commentaries on only two books—Psalms and Matthew. But, of course, he taught on the rest of the Bible all throughout his massive body of work. Logos’ own Elliot Ritzema has undertaken the task of combing through Spurgeon’s essays, lectures, sermons, and books, gathering Spurgeon’s words into commentary form. The first volume—Galatians—is available for download right now, and eight more volumes are available for pre-order at a great discount.

the-speakers-commentaryThe Speaker’s Commentary

In the late nineteenth century, the Anglican Church was at a crossroads. Controversial issues of historical critcism, racism, and polygamy clamored for a definitive response. F. C. Cook led a team of 30 scholars to craft a remarkably self-aware set of commentaries that speak not just to Anglicans but to the the global church about its place in a fallen world. We’re bringing this 13-volume set to Logos through Community Pricing, so you can help set the price—and get an amazing discount.

Download, pre-order, or bid on your favorite commentary sets right now—you can take up to 18 months to pay with an interest-free payment plan.

Pick out your favorite commentaries today!

Further Your Ministry Without Putting It on Pause

Improve Your Ministry with Mobile EdAs Christians, we’re all called to ministry in one form or another. Whether it’s formal work in the church or love and support for someone who needs them, ministry is a huge part of who we’re called to be as followers of Jesus. But how do we do it in a biblical, God-glorifying way?

A biblical education can go a long way toward providing the skills we need to serve those around us. But if you have a family, a job (in or outside the home), or other responsibilities, how can you get this important education?

A new way to learn

Logos Mobile Education is your answer—it’s a new way to study, learn, and grow. There are many courses available that you can start on immediately, and dozens more coming in the near future. They’re all taught by world-class scholars and professors in a format that goes with you wherever you are.

Each course has personal video lectures, helpfully enhanced with on-screen text and broken into small, cohesive segments. These courses make it easy for you to study, whether you have five minutes or an hour. The videos are paired with searchable, highlightable transcripts featuring learning objectives and further readings. This makes your lectures more than just a one-time learning experience: they become reference material you can come back to again and again.

Start learning with Mobile Ed today

Get started with our Bible and Doctrine Foundations Bundle, which contains nine courses designed to help you grasp the basics of doctrine, the flow of Scripture, and even how to use Logos for your studies. And don’t forget to pre-order the Elyse Fitzpatrick Bundle, which gives you three courses on counseling and personal development:

With these practical courses, you’ll begin equipping yourself to better understand God and his Word and to make a deeper impact in the lives of those around you.

Get Logos Mobile Education, and start learning today.